Saint Georges Bay Mythology (Zaytouna Bay)

spacecreature

spacecreature

Well-Known Member
Some of you have spoken about this on other threads but I wanted to create one specifically for this topic, so we can discuss this further.

How many of you have heard of the Saint Georges mythology, and did you know he supposedly slayed the dragon in Beirut? I will post a link to an article talking about this:
St. George Killed the Dragon in Beirut

If there really is such a story (even if it's a stupid fake fairytale, who cares!) why aren't we taking advantage of it and exploiting it to the maximum for tourism? People love such stories and it would give Zaytouna Bay that missing "soul" . Why don't we have like a large statue somewhere on the bay, and why haven't we taken care of those sites mentioned in the article. Does anyone know where they are? I am not from Beirut and I am not sure where those areas he is describing are located, like the grotto, the mosque, the covered pond etc..Can anyone clarify?



There is nothing called Zeitoune bay. It is called the St Georges Bay. The Zeitoune neighborhood is the small neighborhood right behind the St Georges Bay. Historically a red district...Chrameet W Marika and stuff...Wa Qtada Al Tawdi7.

Solidere stole the St Geoges bay and sold it to Chrameet El Zeitoune...Thus the new illegitimate born name :Zeitoune bay.

It's a private property now. There are signs on its entrance saying "private property".
Yes as a kid I remember older people would talk about Zaytoune, as a red district for prostitution. That part of "history" was also covered up, and I really think it's a mistake. Not that I am encouraging prostitution, but again such stories give "soul and personality" to the area. We can embellish it if we must, but we should keep a bit of that exciting "glamour" Beirut had.

lol...yeah right. Tourists who go to Lebanon want unique, authentic experiences. What they now call "Zaytounay Bay" (what a stupid name...it's Saint-Georges Bay) they can find in Miami or Dubai or a bunch of other places. The people who go to Zaytounay Bay are the show-offy type of Lebanese, or those who have no sense of culture and style and who will jump on any shiny bandwagon that is marketed as the "new" or "cool" place to be.

They'll go there, sit at an overpriced table with a crap view, take a selfie in front of other people's yachts to post on facebook and go on with their mindless life. Nice definition of success you have there.
 
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  • Isabella

    Isabella

    The Queen Of "Bazella"
    Orange Room Supporter
    In different versions of the myth Saint George killed the dragon in different cities, so not sure how accurate the account of Beirut is especially since you can find medieval references for Libya, Bulgaria and Greece


    Saint George and the Dragon - Wikipedia


    Side note: ZaytounaY bay is an incredibly stupid name!
     
    Indie

    Indie

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    Some of you have spoken about this on other threads but I wanted to create one specifically for this topic, so we can discuss this further.

    How many of you have heard of the Saint Georges mythology, and did you know he supposedly slayed the dragon in Beirut? I will post a link to an article talking about this:
    St. George Killed the Dragon in Beirut

    If there really is such a story (even if it's a stupid fake fairytale, who cares!) why aren't we taking advantage of it and exploiting it to the maximum for tourism? People love such stories and it would give Zaytouna Bay that missing "soul" . Why don't we have like a large statue somewhere on the bay, and why haven't we taken care of those sites mentioned in the article. Does anyone know where they are? I am not from Beirut and I am not sure where those areas he is describing are located, like the grotto, the mosque, the covered pond etc..Can anyone clarify?
    Dear, the soul of that area is lost and it can't be brought back, unless they agree to destroy everything they built there in the last few decades. The seaside road there used to be called L'Avenue des Français, which is reminiscent of L'Avenue des Anglais in Nice, France. This is what it looked like...typically mediterranean.





    If you notice, there even used to be publicly accessible stairs to a little beach, and the focus in general was human leisure and activity.

    Whereas, now, you can't even see the sea from there, let alone access it. But who cares, as long as a handful of millionaires get to park their yachts in a giant, dirty pool... -_-

    And don't think the removal of the name "Saint-Georges" is a coincidence. If they can't even handle the name, you think they'll put a statue of a Christian saint?
     
    Indie

    Indie

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    If you really want to, or have to, go to that area, but you also disaprove of what they've done to it, I suggest sitting at the Saint-Georges hotel's restaurant / café. The hotel is not functional (that's a whole other story) but the first floor restaurant is open.

    When I was there, looking out the windows, I counted a total of one traditional, red-roofed house remaining among the high-rises.
     
    Isabella

    Isabella

    The Queen Of "Bazella"
    Orange Room Supporter
    Dear, the soul of that area is lost and it can't be brought back, unless you they agree to destroy everything they built there in the last few decades. The seaside road there used to be called L'Avenue des Français, which is reminiscent of L'Avenue des Anglais in Nice, France. This is what it looked like...typically mediterranean.







    If you notice, there even used to be publicly accessible stairs to a little beach, and the focus in general was human leisure and activity.

    Whereas, now, you can't even see the sea from there, let alone access it. But who cares, as long as a handful of millionaires get to park their yachts in a giant, dirty pool... -_-

    And don't think the removal the name "Saint-Georges" is a coincidence. If they can't even handle the name, you think they'll put a statue of a Christian saint?
    Ugh Lebanon, especially Beirut, always looks very beautiful in older pics/paintings and quite soulless in more recent ones!

    I guess that's what happens when people look for profit in the aftermath of a civil war.
     
    The Jade

    The Jade

    Legendary Member
    Every time I pass next to this hotel I feel a squeeze in my heart.
    This used to be the jewel of Beirut, celebrities and politicians alike used to come here for leisure or business.

    Solidere destroyed it and the owner fought a losing battle the whole time, standing tall against Hariri's hegemony, even though he knew nothing will happen.
    Now the St-Georges is all but dead and with no one to fight for it except the owner.
    With the Zaytounay Bay monstrosity, Solidere signed the death warrant of a part of Lebanon's history....just like they did in so many other places....
     
    Indie

    Indie

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    Ugh Lebanon, especially Beirut, always looks very beautiful in older pics/paintings and quite soulless in more recent ones!
    The

    I guess that's what happens when people look for profit in the aftermath of a civil war.
    The building I hate the most in that area (the competition is strong) is this one...



    It's especially ugly from the other side, when you're walking on the corniche.

    One of the most striking things on the corniche is the view you get all the way to the distant mountains. In the winter, the contrast of the palm trees and flowers of the street against the snow-capped mountains in the distance is breathtaking.



    This photo doesn't even do it justice...

    Who, in their right mind, would build a high-rise there? It sticks out like a sore thumb. And it doesn't even have the "decency" to at least be a well-designed building. Just an ugly, concrete rectangle.

    Some before and after...





     
    Dark Angel

    Dark Angel

    Legendary Member
    Some of you have spoken about this on other threads but I wanted to create one specifically for this topic, so we can discuss this further.

    How many of you have heard of the Saint Georges mythology, and did you know he supposedly slayed the dragon in Beirut? I will post a link to an article talking about this:
    St. George Killed the Dragon in Beirut

    If there really is such a story (even if it's a stupid fake fairytale, who cares!) why aren't we taking advantage of it and exploiting it to the maximum for tourism? People love such stories and it would give Zaytouna Bay that missing "soul" . Why don't we have like a large statue somewhere on the bay, and why haven't we taken care of those sites mentioned in the article. Does anyone know where they are? I am not from Beirut and I am not sure where those areas he is describing are located, like the grotto, the mosque, the covered pond etc..Can anyone clarify?

    Yes as a kid I remember older people would talk about Zaytoune, as a red district for prostitution. That part of "history" was also covered up, and I really think it's a mistake. Not that I am encouraging prostitution, but again such stories give "soul and personality" to the area. We can embellish it if we must, but we should keep a bit of that exciting "glamour" Beirut had.
    not much is known about saint georges. chances are that he was a roman soldier and that he was beheaded for not refuting his faith. the rest of his life is wrapped in myth and legend.

    but you are right though, at the moment plenty is being invested to boost Lebanon as a center for religious tourism, which seems account for more than 100 million tourists every year around the globe, and the saint george bay, would contribute towards a more complete plan. i am sure it is already integrated in some way.

    there are however other measures that need to be taken to encourage tourism, starting with the garbage issue, i am not talking about the large processing dumps, but rather about the trash that you find everywhere on the streets, plastic bottles, empty cans, tissue paper etc... this is beyond disgusting, and it is everywhere. our country is dirty beyond imagination, i think it is one of the dirtiest countries in the world, most people would rather throw whatever they are holding on the ground rather than in a trash can. the trash on the road sides is really out of control, and we cannot attract any tourists, especially from developed countries without addressing this weird issue. today i saw someone driving 100,000$ vehicle roll down the window and throw what appeared to be a sandwich wrap on the road while driving, now maybe he is an mtv viewer, but that's not an excuse.
     
    spacecreature

    spacecreature

    Well-Known Member
    The building I hate the most in that area (the competition is strong) is this one...



    It's especially ugly from the other side, when you're walking on the corniche.

    One of the most striking things on the corniche is the view you get all the way to the distant mountains. In the winter, the contrast of the palm trees and flowers of the street against the snow-capped mountains in the distance is breathtaking.



    This photo doesn't even do it justice...

    Who, in their right mind, would build a high-rise there? It sticks out like a sore thumb. And it doesn't even have the "decency" to at least be a well-designed building. Just an ugly, concrete rectangle.

    Some before and after...





    That's La Citadelle de Beyrouth haha. I originally hated it too, but it's starting to grow on me a bit. Which other buildings do you hate??? You need to start an architecture thread if we don't already have one plz lol! That should be fun!

    Zaytouna Bay is not that bad actually, I think it can still be salvaged. Places and cities keep morphing and changing and we can't completely oppose new real estate developments. Sure, things could have been better designed to respect the old spirit of Beirut, but I guess we also need to modernise and compete with other cities like Dubai etc.. I like old buildings with red roofs etc, but I also love modern architecture. I think we just have an obvious zoning problem. I wish they would keep high rises in a specific area, instead of them mushrooming all over the place creating a mess.

    Solidere screwed up a lot, but when you look at the big picture you can't but feel it would have been much worse if they had left that area to its own natural fate. Much more would have been destroyed I am sure (you only need to look at the rest of Beirut and Lebanon) , and we would have ended with much more ugliness in such a prime location.
     
    spacecreature

    spacecreature

    Well-Known Member
    Every time I pass next to this hotel I feel a squeeze in my heart.
    This used to be the jewel of Beirut, celebrities and politicians alike used to come here for leisure or business.

    Solidere destroyed it and the owner fought a losing battle the whole time, standing tall against Hariri's hegemony, even though he knew nothing will happen.
    Now the St-Georges is all but dead and with no one to fight for it except the owner.
    With the Zaytounay Bay monstrosity, Solidere signed the death warrant of a part of Lebanon's history....just like they did in so many other places....
    Well at least they didn't destroy the hotel :) The struggle with Solidere was mostly the access to the sea and who owns what. A friend of a friend has a yacht there and once told me about this funny story, not sure if it's true. But the owner of the hotel is apparently still rich and doesn't give a **** about money especially when he wants to make a bold statement. So this one time he wanted to drive his boat from the sea into his hotel, but the Solidere security in their boats surrounded the area and created like a blockade so he couldn't enter. He went further back to create a momentum and drove directly into them bamm to pave the way haha. His boat was badly hit, but he managed to squeeze in, and when he got to the side of the hotel all the crowd that was watching started clapping and hailing for him haha :)
    The End.
     
    D

    Death To Google

    New Member
    Maronite mythology meets Solidare entrepreneurship. Now that is some quality fusion cuisine :D
     
    Indie

    Indie

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    That's La Citadelle de Beyrouth haha. I originally hated it too, but it's starting to grow on me a bit. Which other buildings do you hate??? You need to start an architecture thread if we don't already have one plz lol! That should be fun!

    Zaytouna Bay is not that bad actually, I think it can still be salvaged. Places and cities keep morphing and changing and we can't completely oppose new real estate developments. Sure, things could have been better designed to respect the old spirit of Beirut, but I guess we also need to modernise and compete with other cities like Dubai etc.. I like old buildings with red roofs etc, but I also love modern architecture. I think we just have an obvious zoning problem. I wish they would keep high rises in a specific area, instead of them mushrooming all over the place creating a mess.

    Solidere screwed up a lot, but when you look at the big picture you can't but feel it would have been much worse if they had left that area to its own natural fate. Much more would have been destroyed I am sure (you only need to look at the rest of Beirut and Lebanon) , and we would have ended with much more ugliness in such a prime location.
    I love modern architecture. I love it when it is mixed appropriately with older surroundings. This is not "architecture." These are contractor grade eyesores built for the purpose of real estate speculation.

    2al citadel al.

    And we don't need to compete with Dubai. Who the heck is Dubai?!!! Dubai has got nothing on old Beirut. It's an artifical city that popped out of nowhere because of oil money.

    Imagine if someone said that Marseille, Barcelona, Rome et al. have to compete with Dubai!
     
    Indie

    Indie

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    @spacecreature

    This is how to properly mix modern and old architecture...







     
    Isabella

    Isabella

    The Queen Of "Bazella"
    Orange Room Supporter
    I love modern architecture. I love it when it is mixed appropriately with older surroundings. This is not "architecture." These are contractor grade eyesores built for the purpose of real estate speculation.

    2al citadel al.

    And we don't need to compete with Dubai. Who the heck is Dubai?!!! Dubai has got nothing on old Beirut. It's an artifical city that popped out of nowhere because of oil money.

    Imagine if someone said that Marseille, Barcelona, Rome et al. have to compete with Dubai!
    Because of oil money and slave labour! It must never ever be ignored that Dubai was and is still being built by south Asian modern day slaves whose passports are kept by the contracting company preventing them from leaving the country... Not only do they make slave wages and are almost living in prisons but they are physically trapped in a country until their work contract is up!
     
    The Jade

    The Jade

    Legendary Member
    Well at least they didn't destroy the hotel :) The struggle with Solidere was mostly the access to the sea and who owns what. A friend of a friend has a yacht there and once told me about this funny story, not sure if it's true. But the owner of the hotel is apparently still rich and doesn't give a **** about money especially when he wants to make a bold statement. So this one time he wanted to drive his boat from the sea into his hotel, but the Solidere security in their boats surrounded the area and created like a blockade so he couldn't enter. He went further back to create a momentum and drove directly into them bamm to pave the way haha. His boat was badly hit, but he managed to squeeze in, and when he got to the side of the hotel all the crowd that was watching started clapping and hailing for him haha :)
    The End.
    True, the struggle was access to the sea, but I think also hotel renovation.
    There is nothing you can do in DT Beirut without the go-ahead of Solidere; this includes any type of work on your own property.
    Solidere refused to do so.

    Issues
    Subscribe to read
     
    spacecreature

    spacecreature

    Well-Known Member
    True, the struggle was access to the sea, but I think also hotel renovation.
    There is nothing you can do in DT Beirut without the go-ahead of Solidere; this includes any type of work on your own property.
    Solidere refused to do so.

    Issues
    Subscribe to read

    I didn't know they are not allowing him to renovate, "Saint George Hotel has been trying for reconstruction permits since 1994. 20 YEARS WITHOUT SUCCESS"
    Coz I remember at one point they renovated it, and then the building was destroyed again with Hariri assassination, so I figured it was just because they lost a lot of money and tourism was at its lowest so it didnt make financial sense to renovate it again.
    But I noticed they removed the stop Solidere sign and replaced it with something like Solidere ends in 2019 or 2020. So unless they renew the contracts, I think Solidere will lose a bit of their authority?
     
    Jo

    Jo

    Administrator
    Master Penguin
    But I noticed they removed the stop Solidere sign and replaced it with something like Solidere ends in 2019 or 2020. So unless they renew the contracts, I think Solidere will lose a bit of their authority?
    Thats new. So the govt should renew for Solidere?
     
    D

    Death To Google

    New Member
    The core downtown architecture and design is nice. The short older looking by design buildings and themes. The economic potential of that area is underutilized and it is quite tastefully designed.

    St. Dragonslayer can be marketed elsewhere... there is a monument to that in Jounieh is there not, for example?
     
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