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Sally Anne Faulkner: My kids were kidnapped to Lebanon - Please help me bring them home

Do you think the father's action is justified?

  • Father's actions are not justified

    Votes: 21 56.8%
  • Father's actions are justified

    Votes: 7 18.9%
  • Don't know. Need more information

    Votes: 9 24.3%

  • Total voters
    37
Indie

Indie

Legendary Member
Orange Room Supporter
How is it that you turn everything into cultural wars and discrimination against those of different race (Arabs) or religion (Islam) for example?

I personally would support the kids to stay with their mother, if she is legally approved, but unless the father is abusing them what's the big deal if they stay with him? aren't you using a humanitarian case to attack her culture and person?

Now if we talk about women in the US who get married to rich men, then they play the victim's role and ask for divorce to get money, will we be against women's rights and coming from a culture that brainwashes us?

Turning everything into cultural wars has made you look in a way that is in contract of the Indie who is supportive of human rights and a better society where cultures coexist in an environment of mutual respect and recognition. Instead, you're currently portraying yourself as an Armenian lobbyist and propaganda mouthpiece who's suffering from Islamophobia and chronic fear of other communities' numbers and lifestyles!
It is Dalzi who brought up culture into this discussion, saying her culture is superior and insulting Sally's culture.

Don't get involved in other people's business, especially when you have no clue what you're talking about.
 
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  • Picasso

    Picasso

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    It is Dalzi who brought up culture into this discussion, saying her culture is superior and insulting Sally's culture.

    Don't get involved in other people's business, especially when you have no clue what you're talking about.
    But your argument behind all this doesn't seem to be children's rights, but rather a fervent racism and sectarianism towards a specific religion, race and culture.

    Shouldn't you leave it a case for the rights of those children to get what is best for them? Why would you use it to express sectarian & racist bashing?
     
    Indie

    Indie

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    But your argument behind all this doesn't seem to be children's rights, but rather a fervent racism and sectarianism towards a specific religion, race and culture.

    Shouldn't you leave it a case for the rights of those children to get what is best for them? Why would you use it to express sectarian & racist bashing?
    Are you obsessed with me or something? Following me from thread to thread...jeez :confused:
     
    Picasso

    Picasso

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    Are you obsessed with me or something? Following me from thread to thread...jeez :confused:
    It's the other way around, if you have noticed with your tit-for-tat childish attitude.

    You present yourself as a human rights advocate, fact is that you're using the children's case to bash other religions and cultures!
     
    Muki

    Muki

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    It's the other way around, if you have noticed with your tit-for-tat childish attitude.

    You present yourself as a human rights advocate, fact is that you're using the children's case to bash other religions and cultures!
    I don't see you criticizing Dalzi, who is much more guilty of what you're accusing Indie of.

    I also did not know that the father is a Martian.
     
    Indie

    Indie

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    I don't see you criticizing Dalzi, who is much more guilty of what you're accusing Indie of.

    I also did not know that the father is a Martian.
    This whole thing started with Dalzi insulting Sally's culture and comparing it to her own culture saying: "Men in my culture are better because they behave this or that way."

    To which I replied: "In that case, men in you culture are neanderthals."

    The funny part is: what did Dalzi imply by culture? How could I be insulting a religion when it is not even clear that by "culture," Dalzi meant religion. For all we know, she meant nationality; in which case, I would be insulting my own culture, since Dalzi and I share the same nationality lol

    Ba3den...even if Dalzi did mean religion, it is precisely because I care about the well-being of the children that I am standing against any culture that would deprive them of their mother.

    Anyway...the desperate attempts at hitting me with something, anything, are getting funnier and funnier :D
     
    Indie

    Indie

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    Faulkner claims her Lebanese husband ‘pressured her to abort the baby

    Sally Faulkner’s estranged Lebanese husband had pressured her to abort their first child, years before she botched an abduction with a 60 Minutes television crew.

    The Brisbane mother said she left Ali Elamine in Dubai and returned to Australia when she fell pregnant with Lahela, now five-years-old.

    Elamine then began pressuring her to have an abortion, before he surprised her with a marriage proposal, Faulkner claimed to ABC’s Australian Story.

    Her friend, Gordana Raljevik, remembered: ‘He was calling me, [sending] emails and messages to her family, to herself – just asking her not to have this child.

    ‘Ali didn’t want to have a bar of it.’

    When Faulkner was about six months’ pregnant, she saw Elamine for the first time since their breakup.


    ‘After one of my scans, I came home,’ she said.

    ‘I looked down, and there were all these rose petals, literally from the front door to the kitchen. I hadn’t seen Ali since I’d said goodbye to him in Dubai. And her got down on one knee and pulled out a ring and said: “Will you marry me?”

    ‘I nearly fell over … I was sort of starting to stumble on my words and he went: “Well, yes or no?” And I said: “Oh, yes, yes, yes, OK, I guess so” … and that was it.’

    The pair were married at Brisbane’s registry office ten days after Lahela was born.

    About three-months later, Elamine said he wanted to move back to Beirut.

    ‘And I just thought: “My home is wherever he is, and wherever Lahela is.” So I packed up with him and [went] over there to support him.’

    The move was hard on Faulkner, who did not speak Arabic. After having their second child, Noah, who is now three-years-old, the pair split and lived in the separate countries.

    In April, the Brisbane mother attempted to snatch her children back from Elamine in Lebanon who refused to return them after they went over for a two-week visit.

    Faulkner, the Nine Network 60 Minutes crew and child recovery agents were all jailed.

    She said every part of her ‘wanted to fall apart’ when she realised her estranged husband had no intention of returning their two children to Australia.

    ‘When he answered the Skype call, I could just see his face and I said to him, “what’s wrong?” And he looked at me and he said, “plans have changed”.

    ‘I said, “what do you mean?” I didn’t quite believe it and he said, “plans have changed, Sal. The kids aren’t coming home.”‘

    Faulkner claims her Lebanese husband ‘pressured her to abort the baby
     
    Indie

    Indie

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    Sally Faulkner says ex-husband took her daughter years before Lebanon 60 Minutes saga

    woman at the centre of the failed 60 Minutes child abduction furore says her estranged husband had taken one of their children from her before.

    Key points:
    • Ms Faulkner says her daughter was first taken away from her in 2011
    • Ms Faulkner was sent home to Australia and did not see daughter for three months
    • Ms Faulkner says the disagreement spawned from "cultural differences"

    Brisbane mother Sally Faulkner has revealed her daughter Lahela, now aged six, was taken away from her in Lebanon when she was 10 months old.

    In an Australian Story exclusive, Ms Faulkner said her then-husband Ali Elamine threw her passport at her and told her to leave the country, without her child, after a dispute over a cultural misunderstanding.

    The disclosure came as Ms Faulkner spoke in-depth for the first time about events that led to Mr Elamine refusing to return Lahela and their younger son Noah from a holiday to Lebanon in May 2015 and why she tried to abduct them in April.

    Ms Faulkner said she was visiting her mother-in-law's home at Chakra, two hours from Beirut, when the misunderstanding occurred in 2011.

    She said she gave a tradesman a glass of water but her action was perceived as "inappropriate".

    "In Australia you offer tradesmen a drink of water if it's hot … I didn't think anything of it," Ms Faulkner said.

    Ms Faulkner said the house painter later that day called her "beautiful".

    "I was blamed for being inappropriate, provocative, flirting and that it was all my fault, even though I tried to explain to Ali that I hadn't done anything except give him a glass of water," she said.

    "It was an honest mistake."

    Later, on her husband's instruction, Ms Faulkner handed Lahela to her mother-in-law for what was supposed to be a goodbye hug, but her daughter was taken inside immediately.

    "My eyes widened, my heart started beating faster and I say 'what's going on?', and he said 'come on we're getting in the car, Lahela is staying here'," Ms Faulkner said.

    Ms Faulkner said Mr Elamine left her alone in the couple's apartment for two weeks, taking her phone's sim card and her passport, disabling the internet and leaving her with $100, before returning and telling her to leave the country.

    "He chucked my passport at me and said 'you're going, Lahela is staying here'," Ms Faulkner said.

    "It was only in that moment when I got my passport physically in my hand I thought 'oh my God this is my only chance of possibly getting out'.

    "In hindsight I wish I fought harder but kicking and screaming wouldn't have done anything except made things worse."

    Ms Faulkner returned to Australia and said she begged her husband to bring Lahela back to her.

    Three months later, Mr Elamine turned up with their daughter.

    Ms Faulkner said he was so sorry for his actions that he signed legal documents placing Lahela's name on the Airport Watchlist monitored by the Australian Federal Police.

    This meant the child would not be able to leave Australia without Ms Faulkner's permission.

    The couple reunited and Ms Faulkner agreed to return to Lebanon, against the advice of her friends and family.

    When Mr Elamine took both children to Lebanon in 2015, the Watchlist order was out of date, having expired in October 2013. However, Mr Elamine was still stopped by authorities at the airport who alerted Ms Faulkner.

    She consented to their departure.

    Mr Elamine was approached to be part of the Australian Story two-part special but declined.

    Sally Faulkner says ex-husband took her daughter years before Lebanon 60 Minutes saga - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)
     
    Indie

    Indie

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    60 Minutes: Sally Faulkner's heartbreak over Lebanon child abduction saga

    Brisbane mother Sally Faulkner reveals in detail, for the first time, the story behind a desperate attempt to get her children back from Beirut, which landed her in jail along with a 60 Minutes crew and a child recovery team.


    It is the "what ifs" that haunt Sally Faulkner.

    What if she had said "no" when her estranged husband Ali Elamine asked to take their children to Lebanon for a holiday?

    What if she refused to let them go instead of driving them to the airport and giving them a hug goodbye?

    "What if I'd just said, 'no, I'm having second thoughts. This isn't a good idea, what am I doing?' I'm naive, I'm stupid, I'm too trusting, just no, don't let them go," Sally said.

    What if she hadn't allowed herself to be so reassured that snatching the children off the streets of Beirut would be a simple operation?

    Media player: "Space" to play, "M" to mute, "left" and "right" to seek.

    'I wish I could make my children appear'

    In a bitter irony, Sally works in child care, taking care of children similar in age to her six-year-old daughter Lahela and three-year-old son Noah.

    "It's a lovely job but it's a double-edged sword when you are giving this love and attention and affection to these little kids that are very similar in age to your own. I wish I could wave a magic wand and make my own appear," Sally said.

    Sally is both shocked and heartbroken to find herself in this predicament.

    Shocked that it turned into some kind of nightmare that saw herjailed in Beirut beside a 60 Minutes crew and the child recovery team. Heartbroken that she has not seen or spoken to the children since she left Lebanon after being released from jail in April.

    Sally still faces kidnapping charges in the Lebanese courts. Harder still has been facing the court of public opinion. Some have been appalled she would rush into a dangerous and foolhardy mission that roundly disrespected Lebanese law.

    Friend Gordana Raljevik said Sally had exhausted every avenue before going down the road of child abduction.

    "I stand behind her," Gordana said.

    "I'm sure as hell protective of her. But you can't sit there and say that she didn't try. At the end of the day Lahela and Noah are going to know that their mother did everything she could to try and get them back.

    "And she hasn't stopped since she got home either. She never will."

    Sally said she had a "happy-go-lucky, fun-filled" childhood and wanted that for her children too.

    Media player: "Space" to play, "M" to mute, "left" and "right" to seek.


    When Ali met Sally

    One click of a mouse changed the entire direction of Sally's life when she was in the final stages of an applied science degree.

    She noticed an online advertisement for a job as cabin crew with Emirates Airlines.

    Before she knew it, she was flying around the world and living the high life in Dubai.

    Her friend and fellow flight attendant Sacha Jordan convinced Sally to go to a party and it was there she met Ali Elamine, a Lebanese man who had lived for a time in the US.

    "Ali came across as laidback, chilled, this surfer dude with an American accent, very friendly to everyone," Sacha said.

    Sally said Ali's charismatic ways "won her over".

    "I fell for him that way but I felt as though I was the one falling for him a little bit too hard," she said.

    "Through our whole relationship it was the push-pull, push-pull and I think it was almost like the chase. He liked the chase and if he felt as though I was falling for him too much, he was almost scared away."

    However, when Sally's three-year contract was up with Emirates, they planned to go their separate ways.

    But that was until Sally discovered she was pregnant. After the shock, she was ecstatic, but Ali did not feel the same way.

    "Ali didn't want a bar of it. I was speaking to him on the phone. He was calling me, calling her, emails, messages to her family, to myself, just asking her not to have this child," Gordana said.

    Sally moved back to Australia and planned for life as a single mother.

    Six months into her pregnancy, Ali had a change of heart. He surprised her at the house, leaving a trail of rose petals before proposing. She said "yes".

    Moving to Lebanon

    Lahela was born in Brisbane in 2010. Ten days later the couple married.

    "When Lahela was born … he became a dad, and a good one," Sacha said.

    When the baby was three months old, the family moved to Lebanon. Ali was keen to join his brother in a business venture.

    The apartment they lived in was in a Hezbollah stronghold.

    For Sally, the reality of life without her usual support networks started to hit home.

    "I didn't really think about what that actually meant, moving to another country that was 180 degrees from the culture that we have here. Away from my family, away from my friends, with a new baby. It was quite a shock," she said.

    Assimilation was harder than she thought. After a traumatic cultural misunderstanding, the marriage was in trouble.

    Ali threw her passport at her and told her to get on a plane, and would not allow her to take Lahela with her. Isolated and vulnerable, Sally felt she had no option but to go.

    The first separation

    Back in Australia, Sally begged Ali to bring Lahela back to her. Ali wanted a divorce.

    But three months later, Sally said Ali was sorry for his actions and mother and daughter were reunited.

    By then Sally had got a Family Court order to put Lahela on an immigration watchlist so she could not be taken out of Australia without Sally's permission. Ali, contrite and hoping to make things work between them, signed the order.

    Much to the disapproval of her mother, Karen Buckley, Sally returned to Lebanon to try to save the marriage.

    "Somehow she had this idea that she was not going to let the marriage fail. So she went back, but I refused to take her to the airport that day," Karen said.

    Sally and Ali came back to Australia for the birth of baby Noah before returning to Lebanon again. Ali worked long days at his surf school business. Sally felt isolated and unable to fit into a culture so different from the one she was used to.

    Sally fears for children's safety

    One afternoon Sally was putting baby Noah down for an afternoon sleep while Ali took Lahela to the movies. She felt the thud through her chest wall and knew immediately that it was a bomb.

    Out her window she could see plumes of black smoke. A deadly car bomb had struck the southern Beirut stronghold of Lebanon's militant Hezbollah group.

    The incident killed 20 people and wounded another 120.

    Sally broke down with the fear that her daughter and husband were among the victims.

    "After what seemed like forever I got a knock at the door and there they were standing there. The relief that went through my body felt like warm water running through my veins," she said.

    It was the last straw. She begged Ali to be allowed to return to Australia with the children. He agreed.

    "If I was going to fit in I would have by now. I would have learnt Arabic. I would be drinking those Arabic coffees. I was Sally from Brisbane and that was ingrained in me. It was who I was. I wasn't going to be Sally from Lebanon."

    'Sally from Brisbane'

    The following year in Brisbane was the happiest of Sally's life.

    She began an early childhood TAFE course and juggled kids, work and study. Ali came and went freely from Lebanon and Sally made sure they Skyped him almost daily when he was away.

    The couple eventually agreed to separate. No-one doubted that Ali was a good father to the children and Sally was keen for him to be an equal part of the children's lives.

    When he visited Australia they sat down and wrote a handwritten co-parenting agreement stating what they both expected from the other.

    Ali accepted Sally as primary caregiver in Australia but requested to take the children back to Lebanon each year for a holiday.

    That agreement was put to the test when, in May 2015, Ali asked to take the children back to Lebanon for a short holiday to see his parents.

    "I thought, 'well we've set that agreement', I did want to stay out of the Family Courts, I need to abide by that to keep the trust," Sally said.

    'Plans have changed'

    Sally drove them to the airport, gave her children a cuddle and looked Ali in the eye.

    "I said to him 'promise me, look me in the eye and promise me that you will bring them back.' He said 'we'll see you in two weeks'.

    A couple of days later, Sally Skyped to speak to the children.

    "He looked at me and he said, 'plans have changed' and that's when you know every part of me just wanted to fall apart.

    "I said 'what do you mean?' I didn't quite believe it and he said, 'plans have changed, the kids aren't coming home."

    In that instant, Sally's world fell apart.

    Ali Elamine was approached to participate in the Australian Story two-part special but declined to comment.

    60 Minutes: Sally Faulkner's heartbreak over Lebanon child abduction saga - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)
     
    Indie

    Indie

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    Everything some of us have been guessing turns out to be true. The guy is a dirtbag, and so is his mother. There is nothing more this woman could have done to make sure her kids grow up with their father, and you had people assuming the opposite and calling her names. If anything, she cared way too much about this guy, for her own good and the good of her kids. You can't expect from narcissists what you'd expect from regular people. They're untrustworthy, they don't feel guilt, and they don't understand the concept of reciprocity.
     
    Mighty Goat

    Mighty Goat

    Legendary Member
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    My friend's kid was kidnapped to the United States. Nothing could bring the child back.
     
    Indie

    Indie

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    My friend's kid was kidnapped to the United States. Nothing could bring the child back.
    Anyone who prevents their child from having a relationship with the other parent (unless the other parent is abusive), suffers from serious psychological issues. When people steal objects, everyone agrees it's wrong. But when they steal babies, some people see nothing wrong with it and even applaud the behavior. What a sickening world this can be.
     
    Mighty Goat

    Mighty Goat

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    Anyone who prevents their child from having a relationship with the other parent (unless the other parent is abusive), suffers from serious psychological issues. When people steal objects, everyone agrees it's wrong. But when they steal babies, some people see nothing wrong with it and even applaud the behavior. What a sickening world this can be.
    This is because divorce, marriage and custody laws are territorial and are governed by the jurisdiction of the state.

    My friend, is categorized terrorist in the United States. His wife was an American. The child was born in Lebanon. I was denied entry to the United States to file a legal case to prevent the child's illegal adoption by an American, who was the new husband of the mother. I was told at the borders no one can take a citizen of America from America.

    Here we have a Lebanese child, born in Lebanon to a Lebanese father and an American mother. The child was kidnapped the to the United States. We also have the Unites States National Security preventing the due process of the law to a Lebanese father who is a suspect of terrorism and a father for an American child born in Lebanon. This father could not demand to keep his name as the name of his child. The chiled was adopted and his name was changed. This is in the United States of America.
     
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