Sally Anne Faulkner: My kids were kidnapped to Lebanon - Please help me bring them home

Do you think the father's action is justified?

  • Father's actions are not justified

    Votes: 21 56.8%
  • Father's actions are justified

    Votes: 7 18.9%
  • Don't know. Need more information

    Votes: 9 24.3%

  • Total voters
    37
Indie

Indie

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This is because divorce, marriage and custody laws are territorial and are governed by the jurisdiction of the state.

My friend, is categorized terrorist in the United States. His wife was an American. The child was born in Lebanon. I was denied entry to the United States to file a legal and just because I wanted to prevent the child's illegal adoption by an American, who was the new husband of the mother. I was told at the borders no one can take a citizen of America from America.

Here we have a Lebanese child, born in Lebanon to a Lebanese father and an American mother. The child was kidnapped the to the United States. We also have the Unites States National Security preventing the due process of the law to a Lebanese father who is a suspect of terrorism and a father for an American child born in Lebanon. This father could not demand to keep his name as the name of his child. The chiled was adopted and his name was changed. This is in the United States of America.
What are you trying to say? That two wrongs make a right? That because the US did this to your friend, it's ok for Lebanese to do this to Westerners?

It's wrong, either way. It's a form of child abuse, as well as emotional abuse of the deprived parent.
 
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  • Mighty Goat

    Mighty Goat

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    What are you trying to say? That two wrongs make a right? That because the US did this to your friend, it's ok for Lebanese to do this to Westerners?

    It's wrong, either way. It's a form of child abuse, as well as emotional abuse of the deprived parent.
    Where did you read this in my post. :argh:
     
    Indie

    Indie

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    Where did you read this in my post. :argh:
    I'm asking if this is what you're saying, because we had a lot of this type of arguments in this thread previously.

    Glad to know this is not what you're saying.
     
    eLad

    eLad

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    This is because divorce, marriage and custody laws are territorial and are governed by the jurisdiction of the state.

    My friend, is categorized terrorist in the United States. His wife was an American. The child was born in Lebanon. I was denied entry to the United States to file a legal case to prevent the child's illegal adoption by an American, who was the new husband of the mother. I was told at the borders no one can take a citizen of America from America.

    Here we have a Lebanese child, born in Lebanon to a Lebanese father and an American mother. The child was kidnapped the to the United States. We also have the Unites States National Security preventing the due process of the law to a Lebanese father who is a suspect of terrorism and a father for an American child born in Lebanon. This father could not demand to keep his name as the name of his child. The chiled was adopted and his name was changed. This is in the United States of America.
    categorized terrorist? you expect the US to to grant custody of an american child to a non US citizen father who is a terrorist?
     
    HannaTheCrusader

    HannaTheCrusader

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    categorized terrorist? you expect the US to to grant custody of an american child to a non US citizen father who is a terrorist?
    sad the child wont be raised to shout al mawt la amrika
     
    Indie

    Indie

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    Sad photograph shows sorrow of Sally Faulkner’s daughter Lahela


    It is the first current photo Ms Faulker has seen for months. Her estranged husband, Ali Elamine, refused to return Lahela and brother Noah from a holiday in Lebanon more 20 months ago, and has cut off her access to them.

    In a post, Ms Faulkner says: “Ali took my kids because he knew how much they meant to me and he thrives on hurting me.

    “But what he can’t see is the pain in our children (’s) eyes. I am lost, nobody is helping me, 300 unanswered emails, crying at lawyers … this is just another night without my children.”

    Nocookies | The Australian
     
    Indie

    Indie

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    GoFundMe: #1 for Crowdfunding & Fundraising Websites / support4sally

    BRING THEM HOME.

    This page has been set up and maintained by a few of Sally's friends, to raise funds for the ongoing legal fees and battle to bring Lahela and Noah home to Australia.

    No parent should ever have to live through what Sally is currently living through, and no child should be denied access to a capable and loving parent.
    ____________________________________________

    Everyday is a living nightmare.

    My name is Sally Faulkner and I am a left behind parent in Australia.

    In May 2015, my ex husband took our children Noah and Lahela (ages 2 & 4 at the time) on a trip to Lebanon, with the intention and promise of returning them three weeks later. The day he arrived he told me that the children would never return to Australia. He promised everyone here including my family and our four year old daughter that they would be coming home again.

    I’ve tirelessly fought for help but I’m now at breaking point.

    The Australian government has done nothing. It’s ridiculous - Australia is one of only a few countries where parental child abduction isn't "criminalised", so the government isn't helping. I’m desperate to hear Lahela’s voice, to hold Noah’s precious hands - to tell them both mummy loves and misses them terribly.

    Ali leaves the children now full time with his mother who is about seventy and who doesn't speak much English as he goes to work in Beirut two and a half hours away from where the children stay.

    Lahela and Noah are much loved children, very missed and were well cared for in Australia. It's been a long and agonising 92 weeks since they have been gone.

    Since Ali has taken the children out of Australia he has refused any type of communication and ignored all attempts from my side to organise any form of contact with the children.

    Sally.
     
    My Moria Moon

    My Moria Moon

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    The guy is a mega idiot if he's not aware of the mental suffering he must be causing 3 people. Or if he does but doesn't care much, as long as only he, and mama emm 3ali, feel good.
     
    Indie

    Indie

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    The guy is a mega idiot if he's not aware of the mental suffering he must be causing 3 people. Or if he does but doesn't care much, as long as only he, and mama emm 3ali, feel good.
    He's not an idiot. Psychologists would call him a malignant narcissist. In religious terms, he has turned his back on God, love, and his own soul.

    And don't be mistaken: he doesn't feel good. Healthy, happy people do not behave this way.
     
    My Moria Moon

    My Moria Moon

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    Like a light bulb a hot summer night, this thread revival will hopefully attract @Dirty Dragon back from his hibernation in support for Ali :jimlad:
     
    My Moria Moon

    My Moria Moon

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    He's not an idiot. Psychologists would call him a malignant narcissist. In religious terms, he has turned his back on God, love, and his own soul.

    And don't be mistaken: he doesn't feel good. Healthy, happy people do not behave this way.
    Feel good as a crooked narcissist would and in the sense you just described. Hence an idiot.
     
    Indie

    Indie

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    Feel good as a crooked narcissist would and in the sense you just described. Hence an idiot.
    We should pray for his soul and that he sees the light, sooner rather than later, so that he can fix the damage he is causing to others and himself.

    We should also pray for Sally to get her children back, whether or not Ali changes his ways.
     
    My Moria Moon

    My Moria Moon

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    We should pray for his soul and that he sees the light, sooner rather than later, so that he can fix the damage he is causing to others and himself.

    We should also pray for Sally to get her children back, whether or not Ali changes his ways.
    His soul may be better helped by a good shia exorcist, or other marja3iye shi3iye who could talk him back to common sense.

    As for the poor woman, allah ysabbera and may she find comfort somewhere. If you think his departure from this earth would increase her chances, think again, there's always emm 3ali and the rest of the Leb family branch to take over the kids.
     
    Danny Z

    Danny Z

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    'He circumcised my son without asking': Sally Faulkner 'discovered her ex-husband gave their son the Muslim religious procedure' while in hiding after 60 Minutes' botched abduction


    Sally Faulkner discovered ex-husband had their son Noah circumcised | Daily Mail Online
    Hahaha that's the best one, they bring the islamophobia into the game, Muslim religious procedure 2al, cicumcision is common in all religions, what are they going to say next asselou sha3rou marines style, he's going to send him to war.
     
    Indie

    Indie

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    I said months ago, in this thread, that history won't go in favor of Ali (and by that, I mean what he represents in this case). Looks like history is already being made, one step at a time.



    Beirut (AFP) - Every week, young divorcee Rita Choukeir looks forward to the three precious hours she gets with her young son in Lebanon, where child custody is awarded according to religious rulings.

    Typically hailed as one of the region's most liberal countries, Lebanon's so-called personal status issues -- including marriage, divorce, and child custody -- are still determined by authorities of its 18 religious sects.

    Shiite religious courts have ruled that divorced mothers must turn over custody of their sons when they reach two, and daughters aged seven, when custody goes de facto to the father.

    But hundreds of mothers, including 24-year-old Choukeir, are fighting back.

    "As a mother, you have the biggest right to rebel, to take on the whole world to protect your son," said Choukeir, who has been fighting for custody of her four-year-old son Adam since her divorce in 2015.

    Her struggle is familiar and traumatic: Choukeir grew up seeing her own divorced mother just eight hours a week because of a ruling by a religious court.

    Barely holding back her tears, she told AFP: "I've seen the pain of both experiences: my own as a child raised far away from her mother, and a mother kept from her son."

    Adam has been living with his father since shortly after the divorce, but Choukeir is now appealing to the country's top Shiite Muslim court for full custody.

    - 'Not open for discussion' -

    Choukeir told AFP she was not expecting the court to rule in her favour, but that she would not stop fighting for custody "until the last of my days".

    "I don't trust the (religious) court, I'm afraid of it," Choukeir said.

    "How can someone like me, who was deprived of her mother at three years old because of this court, trust it today?"

    According to Shiite scholars, the custody rule is an interpretation of the hadith (words and practices of the Prophet Mohammed) and the Koran, which stipulate that fathers are responsible for child-rearing.


    Ali Makki, who heads the religious court at Lebanon's Supreme Islamic Shiite Council, told AFP: "The Shiite sect relies primarily on interpretation, but the highest point of reference for the council is in Najaf," a Shiite shrine city in Iraq.

    "Amending the issue (of custody) is not easy for the Shiite sect."

    A similar custody rule once applied to Lebanon's Sunni population, but after widespread pushback, clerics amended it and Sunni divorcees were granted full custody until their children turned 12.

    Now, Shiite mothers in Lebanon are waging their own protest campaign, with Choukeir's case as a rallying cry.

    On a recent Saturday afternoon, dozens of mothers gathered with their children at the Supreme Islamic Shiite Council headquarters in Beirut.

    Organised by the "Protecting Lebanese Women" campaign, protesters held banners that read, "Custody is a right for Rita and every mother!"

    "We have been waging this battle for four years without any positive response from the Supreme Islamic Shiite Council, which insists that this issue is not open for discussion," said campaign head Zeina Ibrahim.

    - 'Stood my ground' -

    In some cases, divorcees offer to give up their alimony in exchange for full custody. But sometimes, Shiite women who resist lose their visitation rights, or are even jailed.

    In early November, Fatima Hamza, 32, spent six days behind bars after refusing to hand over her four-year-old son Ali to his father.

    The top Shiite court had ruled that since her son was older than two, full custody would be awarded to his father.

    "The court didn't even listen to me. Instead, they added to the injustice against me," she told AFP.

    While Hamza was imprisoned, Ali stayed with a relative and later returned to his mother's care -- although his father is still pressing the legal battle for full custody.

    "They renewed their demands that I be imprisoned again but I stood my ground. I told the judge that I was ready to go to jail again, but I would not implement this unjust and unfair decision," she said.

    Surrounded by women outside the Shiite Council's headquarters, Hamza said Lebanese "mothers are becoming more daring after breaking down the walls of fear".

    Last year, Darine Salman was jailed for 27 days when she refused to hand over custody of her six-year-old son to her Kuwaiti husband.

    By the time she was released, Salman's husband had taken custody of their son.

    "The religious judge ruled in favour of the father, as expected. He refused to listen to me or let me defend myself," Salman, 36, told AFP.

    "I don't want my rights. I just want to see my son."

    Shiite Lebanese women wage painful custody battles
     
    JustLeb

    JustLeb

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    We should pray for his soul and that he sees the light, sooner rather than later, so that he can fix the damage he is causing to others and himself.

    We should also pray for Sally to get her children back, whether or not Ali changes his ways.
    ma ra7 t7elli 3an dahro la khayna Ali ??? :D :D :D
     
    Dark Angel

    Dark Angel

    Legendary Member
    I said months ago, in this thread, that history won't go in favor of Ali (and by that, I mean what he represents in this case). Looks like history is already being made, one step at a time.



    Beirut (AFP) - Every week, young divorcee Rita Choukeir looks forward to the three precious hours she gets with her young son in Lebanon, where child custody is awarded according to religious rulings.

    Typically hailed as one of the region's most liberal countries, Lebanon's so-called personal status issues -- including marriage, divorce, and child custody -- are still determined by authorities of its 18 religious sects.

    Shiite religious courts have ruled that divorced mothers must turn over custody of their sons when they reach two, and daughters aged seven, when custody goes de facto to the father.

    But hundreds of mothers, including 24-year-old Choukeir, are fighting back.

    "As a mother, you have the biggest right to rebel, to take on the whole world to protect your son," said Choukeir, who has been fighting for custody of her four-year-old son Adam since her divorce in 2015.

    Her struggle is familiar and traumatic: Choukeir grew up seeing her own divorced mother just eight hours a week because of a ruling by a religious court.

    Barely holding back her tears, she told AFP: "I've seen the pain of both experiences: my own as a child raised far away from her mother, and a mother kept from her son."

    Adam has been living with his father since shortly after the divorce, but Choukeir is now appealing to the country's top Shiite Muslim court for full custody.

    - 'Not open for discussion' -

    Choukeir told AFP she was not expecting the court to rule in her favour, but that she would not stop fighting for custody "until the last of my days".

    "I don't trust the (religious) court, I'm afraid of it," Choukeir said.

    "How can someone like me, who was deprived of her mother at three years old because of this court, trust it today?"

    According to Shiite scholars, the custody rule is an interpretation of the hadith (words and practices of the Prophet Mohammed) and the Koran, which stipulate that fathers are responsible for child-rearing.


    Ali Makki, who heads the religious court at Lebanon's Supreme Islamic Shiite Council, told AFP: "The Shiite sect relies primarily on interpretation, but the highest point of reference for the council is in Najaf," a Shiite shrine city in Iraq.

    "Amending the issue (of custody) is not easy for the Shiite sect."

    A similar custody rule once applied to Lebanon's Sunni population, but after widespread pushback, clerics amended it and Sunni divorcees were granted full custody until their children turned 12.

    Now, Shiite mothers in Lebanon are waging their own protest campaign, with Choukeir's case as a rallying cry.

    On a recent Saturday afternoon, dozens of mothers gathered with their children at the Supreme Islamic Shiite Council headquarters in Beirut.

    Organised by the "Protecting Lebanese Women" campaign, protesters held banners that read, "Custody is a right for Rita and every mother!"

    "We have been waging this battle for four years without any positive response from the Supreme Islamic Shiite Council, which insists that this issue is not open for discussion," said campaign head Zeina Ibrahim.

    - 'Stood my ground' -

    In some cases, divorcees offer to give up their alimony in exchange for full custody. But sometimes, Shiite women who resist lose their visitation rights, or are even jailed.

    In early November, Fatima Hamza, 32, spent six days behind bars after refusing to hand over her four-year-old son Ali to his father.

    The top Shiite court had ruled that since her son was older than two, full custody would be awarded to his father.

    "The court didn't even listen to me. Instead, they added to the injustice against me," she told AFP.

    While Hamza was imprisoned, Ali stayed with a relative and later returned to his mother's care -- although his father is still pressing the legal battle for full custody.

    "They renewed their demands that I be imprisoned again but I stood my ground. I told the judge that I was ready to go to jail again, but I would not implement this unjust and unfair decision," she said.

    Surrounded by women outside the Shiite Council's headquarters, Hamza said Lebanese "mothers are becoming more daring after breaking down the walls of fear".

    Last year, Darine Salman was jailed for 27 days when she refused to hand over custody of her six-year-old son to her Kuwaiti husband.

    By the time she was released, Salman's husband had taken custody of their son.

    "The religious judge ruled in favour of the father, as expected. He refused to listen to me or let me defend myself," Salman, 36, told AFP.

    "I don't want my rights. I just want to see my son."

    Shiite Lebanese women wage painful custody battles
    they are raising the wrong slogans. there are no "lawla 7arf el ha2 lakounta nabi" signs, better luck next time :p
     
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