Shutdown over a Wall

The Shutdown will lead to

  • A compromise

    Votes: 4 30.8%
  • Building the wall

    Votes: 3 23.1%
  • Not Building the wall

    Votes: 6 46.2%
  • A trump victory

    Votes: 5 38.5%
  • Democrats Victory

    Votes: 6 46.2%
  • Nobody win

    Votes: 2 15.4%
  • An economic slowdown

    Votes: 4 30.8%
  • Society suffering

    Votes: 4 30.8%

  • Total voters
    13
proIsrael-nonIsraeli

proIsrael-nonIsraeli

Legendary Member
January 2018 Dow Jones was 26700 18 month later June 2019 the Dow is at 25000. Check your 401K and come tell me how great the economy is.
The minimum wage has increased to 15 in mostly democratic states, republican state are still between 7.5 and 9 dollars an hour.
As for the wall building 3 miles out of 3500 miles in 3 years is not an achievement.
The man is an idiot he is ruining America.
Last month my 401K lost $15K.
From beginning of the year my 401K gained $45K

Now, am I upset about my $15K (so called) loss - no because it is just a loss of unrealized gains (nonexistent loss or gain).

In reality I consider it a benefit because I was able to by Dow stocks much cheaper than otherwise and by the time I am ready to retire those stocks will be much more expensive and this is when my true gain will materialize.

"minimum wage" - issue is bullshit issue for several reasons.

First, there are jobs that do not worth paying more than minimal wage if even that.
Second, this is just introductory (grace period that usually lasts few weeks) wage, after that you are either fired or your wage go and steadily too.

"minimum wage" may be good political tool, but in reality it does nothing to you.
 
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  • HannaTheCrusader

    HannaTheCrusader

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    mexico publishes the trump agreement and in it

    mexico must act as a third country ( holding country for illegals)
    mexico must send over 6000 troops to protect the borders

    BRAVO TRUMP
     
    proIsrael-nonIsraeli

    proIsrael-nonIsraeli

    Legendary Member
    Trump is wrong - I will never get tired of winning.
     
    NiceV

    NiceV

    Well-Known Member
    Fascist Presidency" Is Running "Concentration Camps" On The Southern Border
    Posted By Tim Hains
    On Date June 18, 2019



    Monday evening on Instagram Live, Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez responded to reports that Fort Sill in Oklahoma is being used as a detention center for Latin American migrants captured at the border, denouncing the Trump administration for "running concentration camps on our southern border."

    During World War Two, Fort Sill was used as an internment camp for Japanese-Americans suspected of sympathizing with or aiding Japan in the war.




    "That is exactly what they are. They are concentration camps," Ocasio-Cortez said. "This is not just about the immigrant communities being held in concentration camps, this is a crisis on if America will remain America in its principles and values, or if we are losing to an authoritarian and fascist presidency."

    "I don’t use those words lightly," she explained. "I don’t use those words to just throw bombs. I use that word because that is what an administration that creates concentration camps is. A presidency that creates concentration camps is fascist, and it’s very difficult to say that."

    "The fact that concentration camps are now an institutionalized practice in the home of the free is extraordinarily disturbing, and we need to do something about it,” she added.
     
    NiceV

    NiceV

    Well-Known Member
    Dems make U-turn on calling border a 'manufactured crisis'

    Dems make U-turn on calling border a 'manufactured crisis'
    TheHill.com


    BY ALEXANDER BOLTON 732
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    Democrats have done a U-turn on their claim from earlier this year that President Trump’s concern about illegal immigration at the southern border was a “manufactured crisis.”

    Democrats now acknowledge there is a genuine humanitarian crisis and are preparing to pass legislation that would provide as much as $4.5 billion in federal aid to address the surge of migrants from Central America.

    A surging number of arrests, media reports of smugglers renting children to desperate migrants to help them gain entry into the United States and stories of children dying in U.S. custody have changed the narrative.

    Earlier this year, Senate Minority Leader Charles Schumer (D-N.Y.) and Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) accused Trump of exaggerating problems at the border to stoke fear among Americans and distract from the turmoil of his own administration.

    After Trump issued an Oval Office address to the nation on Jan. 8 proclaiming the border situation a “crisis of the heart and a crisis of the soul,” Schumer and Pelosi gave a side-by-side rebuttal.

    “This president just used the backdrop of the Oval Office to manufacture a crisis, stoke fear and divert attention from the turmoil in his administration,” Schumer said in the midst of a 35-day government shutdown sparked by a partisan disagreement over funding border barriers.

    Other Democrats made similar dismissals.

    “The President has manufactured a humanitarian crisis. It is solely Trump’s fault NOT the Democrats,” House Homeland Security Committee Chairman Bennie Thompson (D-Miss.) tweeted.

    Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.), a leading contender for the Democratic presidential nomination, admonished Trump in a video statement: “Mr. President, we don’t need to create artificial crises. We have enough real ones.”

    Trump subsequently backed down and agreed to reopen the government despite getting only $1.3 billion for border barriers, less than what Democrats on the Senate Appropriations Committee voted for earlier in the year.

    Democrats again balked before the Memorial Day recess when they refused to add Trump’s request for $4.5 billion in emergency border funding to a disaster relief bill that the president signed into law two weeks ago. But the steady stream of heart-wrenching stories and eye-popping statistics has changed the political environment on Capitol Hill, and it now appears a bipartisan deal on the border is imminent.

    Polling shows that voters have grown more concerned about the migrant surge at the border since the government shutdown over Trump’s border wall earlier this year. A Washington Post–ABC News poll published in late April found that more than a third of Americans saw illegal immigration as a “crisis,” an increase of 11 percentage points compared to January.

    A Harvard CAPS–Harris Poll survey published in early May found that 56 percent of U.S. voters said they believed there is “a growing humanitarian and security crisis” at the border, while 44 percent said it was a “manufactured political crisis.”

    Schumer last week described the Democrats’ plan to address the crisis in a floor speech, and two of its main elements mirrored a plan being pushed by Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.), the chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee.

    Graham said Tuesday that he is in talks with Schumer to merge their proposals and expressed hope that reforms such as allowing migrants from Central America to apply for asylum from their own countries or from Mexico and to provide money for more immigration judges on the border — two ideas that Schumer has also endorsed — could be added to the border supplemental bill.

    “I haven’t heard anyone say it’s a manufactured crisis for quite some time,” Senate Homeland Security Committee Chairman Ron Johnson (R-Wis.) observed of his Senate Democratic colleagues.

    Customs and Border Protection agents have seen a 135 percent increase in apprehensions on the southern border, including a 74 percent increase in unaccompanied minors and a 463 percent increase in family units during the first six months of fiscal 2019 compared to 2018.

    Arrests at the border jumped to 144,000 in May, including 55,000 children apprehended. It marked a 32 percent increase compared to April and the highest number of arrests in one month in more than a decade. At least five migrant children have died after being detained by Border Patrol agents.

    “In recent weeks it’s gotten clearer and clearer there is a dramatic humanitarian crisis, again, at the border,” said Sen. Christopher Coons (D-Del.), a member of the Judiciary Committee.

    He blamed Trump’s “refusal to move forward” on comprehensive immigration reform as “contributing to that humanitarian crisis” but added “there’s a lot we could do jointly and should do jointly” in Congress right now to address the border situation.

    Democrats such as Coons admit that “manufactured crisis” was probably not the best phrase to use months ago as it might now be seen as minimizing the human suffering at the border. Coons said colleagues who used that terminology were trying to argue that Trump’s policies had made the situation worse.

    “The phrase manufactured crisis could be misunderstood as suggesting it’s not a real crisis. It is a real crisis. There are people actually suffering. There are children dying. There are families in distress. It is a crisis,” Coons said. “The phrase ‘manufactured’ I think was used by some to emphasize the president’s role in making it worse.”

    Asked Tuesday if it was right to call the border situation a manufactured crisis earlier this year, Schumer blamed Trump for making conditions much worse.

    “The bottom line is very simple: The border situation has been made worse and worse and worse by President Trump,” he said.

    Schumer argued that Trump’s policy of removing young children from their parents in detention is “inhumane” and called the president’s varying strategies for slowing the migrant surge, such as calling for a border wall and threatening tariffs against Mexico, “erratic.”

    “Now he says send a million immigrants back home. Every day he has a new policy, none of which have never been followed through on,” he said.

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    Democrats now concede, however, they may need to give ground on improving border security but claim that Republicans should also be more open to providing assistance to Central American counties, improving the conditions of immigrants detained and giving them a chance to pursue legitimate asylum claims.

    Sen. Gary Peters (Mich.), the ranking Democrat on the Homeland Security Committee, said conditions at the border have deteriorated dramatically since Democrats accused Trump of using the Oval Office to stoke fears about a “manufactured crisis.”

    “It’s actually evolved. We’ve seen an escalation just in the last couple months. We have seen a big increase in the last two of half months from Central America. It evolved over time,” he said.

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    NiceV

    NiceV

    Well-Known Member
    Senate panel approves $4.5B for Trump's border request

    Senate panel approves $4.5B for Trump's border request
    BY JORDAIN CARNEY 39
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    The Senate Appropriations Committee approved legislation on Wednesday that would give President Trump more than $4.5 billion in additional spending tied to the U.S.-Mexico border.

    The GOP-controlled panel voted 30-1 to approve the legislation, paving the way for a Senate vote before lawmakers leave for the July 4th recess.

    The panel provides a total of $4.59 billion to Trump in response to the administration's request for emergency spending along the border. More than half—$2.88 billion—would go to the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) for unaccompanied children.

    Senators and administration officials argued new funding was needed by early next month to shore up the HHS's Office of Refugee Resettlement, or it would run out money and require employees and grantees to operate on "I.O.U.s."

    The bill also includes new money for the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), including Customs and Border Protection (CBP) and Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE).

    Sens. Richard Shelby (R-Ala.) and Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.) on Tuesday reached a deal on the package after negotiating through the weekend, including on a plane ride back from Paris.

    Leahy, during the committee’s hearing, called their bill a “good faith compromise.”

    "The package that we are considering today is primary a humanitarian assistance package,” Leahy said.

    Shelby also asked members of the committee to hold off from offering “poison pills” or other immigration language, which could complicate the bill’s chances.

    "This package does not include everything that I would have wanted, it does not include everything that Senator Leahy would want but most importantly it does not include poison pills from either parties,” Shelby added.

    The bill still needs to pass the Senate, where it will require 60 votes, and win over the Democratic-controlled House. The legislation could face a steeper challenge in the House, where Democrats have been wary of directly or indirectly bolstering Trump’s border policies.

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    A House aide told The Hill on Tuesday night that Democrats were not yet signed onto the Senate bill and hadn’t yet seen the details. If the House passes its own bill, they would need to go to conference to reconcile the proposal with the Senate.

    The deal comes after Trump's request, which appeared dead for weeks amid partisan divisions, had its first signs of life last week when Senate Republicans announced that they would take up a bill.

    The White House's request included $3.3 billion for humanitarian aid, which the administration says would be used to increase shelters and care for unaccompanied minors, in addition to processing arrivals. They've also asked for roughly $1.1 billion for other border operations like expanding the number of detention beds and providing more investigation resources
     
    NiceV

    NiceV

    Well-Known Member
    Border Patrol chief 'extremely offended' by Ocasio-Cortez's concentration camp comments

    Border Patrol chief 'extremely offended' by Ocasio-Cortez's concentration camp comments
    BY ELLEN MITCHELL 0
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    Border Patrol Chief Carla Provost said Thursday that she found recent remarks comparing detention facilities at the U.S.-Mexico border to concentration camps “offensive.”

    “I personally find them offensive,” Provost told lawmakers during a House Homeland Security subcommittee hearing. “My men and women, as well as the men and women in [Immigration and Customs Enforcement], are doing the best that they can with the limited resources that they have.”

    The Trump administration official was responding to questions from Rep. Michael Guest (R-Miss.), who asked her about Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez's (D-N.Y.) remarks earlier this week that made the comparison.

    Ocasio-Cortez sparked backlash on the right after she said on Instagram Live on Monday when referring to facilities meant to hold and process migrants that "the U.S. is running concentration camps on our southern border, and that is exactly what they are.”

    "Recently, a member of Congress has referred to those detention centers as concentration camps. Remarks which myself and other members of Congress find highly offensive. Would you care to comment on that matter?" Guest asked the Border Patrol chief Thursday.

    Provost replied that she has spoken to agents who are “bringing toys in for children and buying them with their personal money; agents are bringing in clothes; they're feeding babies; they're going above and beyond day in and day out to try to care for these individuals to the best of their ability. And this is not what they were trained or what they signed up for to do.”

    “I am extremely offended by those comments,” she added.

    Provost also noted that Border Patrol operations and agents are being "overwhelmed on a daily basis" by an influx of migrants traveling across the border.

    “I have been forced to divert 40 to 60 percent of border patrol’s manpower away from the border as we process and care for nearly 435,000 families and children that have flooded across our southern border so far this year,” she said.

    The Trump administration has been housing thousands of immigrant families that have illegally crossed the border, often seeking asylum at a growing number of detention centers.

    Conditions at the centers, however, have repeatedly come under criticism, and in a recent report, the Department of Homeland Security's inspector general found “egregious” circumstances including “unusable” bathrooms, overcrowded holding areas and expired food.

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    Ocasio-Cortez has since defended her remarks, which have continued to draw the ire of conservatives.

    Acting Homeland Security Secretary Kevin McAleenan, meanwhile, has asked lawmakers to approve a $4.6 billion border supplemental bill to aid the overwhelmed border agencies.

    The Senate Appropriations Committee approved the supplemental on Wednesday and it now will be taken up by the full chamber.
     
    NiceV

    NiceV

    Well-Known Member
    Mexico deploys 15,000 troops to US border
    The Crusader Wall

    Mexico deploys 15,000 troops to US border
    BY ZACK BUDRYK 1
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    Mexico’s defense minister said Monday that the nation has deployed nearly 15,000 troops to its northern border to increase border enforcement, part of a deal to avert U.S. tariffs on Mexican goods, according to AFP.

    "We have a total deployment, between the National Guard and army units, of 14,000, almost 15,000 men in the north of the country," Defense Minister Luis Cresencio Sandoval said at a Monday joint press conference with President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador.

    Mexico had previously announced its plans to deploy 6,000 National Guardsmen to its southern border with Guatemala but its plans for beefing up security on its border with the U.S. had not previously been disclosed, according to the news service.

    Sandoval confirmed the Mexican forces were detaining migrants attempting to cross the border, according to AFP.

    "Given that (undocumented) migration is not a crime but rather an administrative violation, we simply detain them and turn them over to the authorities” with Mexico’s National Migration Institute, Sandoval said.

    Mexican security forces have not historically detained migrants at the northern border, and the government has been subject to increased criticism following a photograph last week depicting heavily armed National Guardsman stopping women and a child from crossing the Rio Grande, according to AFP.

    President Trump had threatened to hit Mexico with tariffs if the country did not take steps to secure the border. Under the agreement between Mexico and the U.S., Mexico has 45 days to demonstrate increased border enforcement.
     
    NiceV

    NiceV

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