Syrian civil War, a model war of the 21st century

H

Hani_Farah

New Member
Many consider the war in Syria to be largely over, especially after the crackdowns on multiple IS cells in the Levant. Putting all political leanings and opinions aside, one unmissable contributing factor to the war has been climate change. As such, major global policies must be put into effect to combat this phenomenon.

From 2007 to 2010, Syria experienced an extreme drought that left the wheat harvest at an all-time low and caused many farmers to migrate from rural areas to already jam-packed cities in search of better economic prospects. The 2003 Iraq war led more than a million Iraqis to flee to Syrian cities for refuge, and the influx of another one million internally displaced Syrians may well have caused societal tension leading to the conflict. The drought may not have been the main reason for the eruption of the civil war, but it was the factor that pushed it over the edge.

Worldwide protests, starting in Brussels with the student strikes and traveling all the way across the globe are an attestation to the need for better environmental planning. It is not enough to ban plastic straws when our transportation, domestic, and industrial needs are still largely reliant on fossil fuels. The need for a sound, ethical, far-sighted leadership and vision is crucial now more than ever, not only to prevent war and conflict, but also to safeguard the life of our planet beyond our own lifetime.
 
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  • Iron Maiden

    Iron Maiden

    Paragon of Bacon
    Staff member
    I really like ur POV, climate change brought down the roman empire through the freezing of the rhine and destruction of the libyan breadbasket, and had already brought civilization to an end in the Mediterranean in 1170BC.

    It would be interesting to imagine what climate change effects in southeast asia will have on the geopolitical level as it is the most populated area of the world today and will be the most hard hit and will lack clean water access. But indeed it is not far fetched to link the syrian phenomenon to climate change ripples!
     
    mrsrx

    mrsrx

    Newish Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    Closing borders, denying climate change and thinking "economic" immigration will stop at one point is basically to condemn millions in a future not that far from today to die from thurst, hunger or ressource warfare.
    Economic reasons pushing the movement of populations is largerly but indirectly due to water and food shortages in subsaharian Africa and other regions. When ressources are low a Mad Max scenario more often than get installed and not a helpful collaborative system to help most people survive.

    To those thinking Climate change is resolved by cranking up your ACs....think farther! Good point OP!
     
    Iron Maiden

    Iron Maiden

    Paragon of Bacon
    Staff member
    As the weather patterns keep changing, lack of water is starting to hit hard the indian subcontinent, part of the most populated region of the earth.

     
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