the culture of mediocrity. another indicator. why we do not do things the right way?

Dark Angel

Dark Angel

Legendary Member
proper earthing.

for couple of decades and only until very recently, the pride of Lebanon was the real estate revolution, new buildings were springing up like mushroom, with obscene prices if you ask me, many selling for well beyond 2000$ per square meter.

and yet, not a single building has proper grounding implemented. even our engineers appear to be skipping on safety requirements.

the third component on a normal plug is for earth, this is not for show, and it is not placed there to give you a hard time finding the right outlet. what does that earth prong do? it provides proper grounding to protect from surges, electrical shocks, etc... on a period of a couple of years, home owners would have spent many many folds in cost of fried equipment, from lightning and other things, than it would have had cost them to integrate that third wire and connect it properly.



i cannot believe proper earthing is not yet mandatory in Lebanese regulations. the cost i had to pay in the last couple of years alone amounts to a couple of thousand dollars for fried equipment.

and for the record, without proper grounding surge protectors do not work that well and are mostly just expensive extension cords in most cases.

so until proper measures are taken, every time there is a lightning storm coming, unplug whatever it is you do not want to have fried, s7abo el berrad, shilo el TV, taffo el computer, w unplug that ishtirak ethernet cable which acts like a paratonnaire with the minor distinction that it routs every lightning strike in the area straight into your router not away from your home. maybe that should find its way into our laws and regulations instead of mandatory safety measures.
 
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  • Iron Maiden

    Iron Maiden

    Paragon of Bacon
    Orange Room Supporter
    Protip @Dark Angel, dont fry your appliances, they’re not even edible, i’ve tried

    On a more serious note, i asked my friend who works at a big civil construction company in leb abot grounding in their projects, his reply was the following:

    :lol: :lol: ensa habboub

    So there you go, enjoy ur new fridge m8!
     
    My Moria Moon

    My Moria Moon

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    Protip @Dark Angel, dont fry your appliances, they’re not even edible, i’ve tried

    On a more serious note, i asked my friend who works at a big civil construction company in leb abot grounding in their projects, his reply was the following:

    :lol::lol: ensa habboub

    So there you go, enjoy ur new fridge m8!
    With a friend like this my dearest Iron, who needs enemies at the gate, or inside the house?

    It's easy to blame the system that lacks effective laws and tools to enforce these installation routines. But in fact, it's ultimately about a norm, the respect for human life, that is totally absent in a rotten mentality on all levels, inside companies in the private sector as well in the public unbeatable dead horse we call Lebanese state.
     
    The Blind Monk

    The Blind Monk

    Your will, my hands.
    Orange Room Supporter
    proper earthing.

    for couple of decades and only until very recently, the pride of Lebanon was the real estate revolution, new buildings were springing up like mushroom, with obscene prices if you ask me, many selling for well beyond 2000$ per square meter.

    and yet, not a single building has proper grounding implemented. even our engineers appear to be skipping on safety requirements.

    the third component on a normal plug is for earth, this is not for show, and it is not placed there to give you a hard time finding the right outlet. what does that earth prong do? it provides proper grounding to protect from surges, electrical shocks, etc... on a period of a couple of years, home owners would have spent many many folds in cost of fried equipment, from lightning and other things, than it would have had cost them to integrate that third wire and connect it properly.



    i cannot believe proper earthing is not yet mandatory in Lebanese regulations. the cost i had to pay in the last couple of years alone amounts to a couple of thousand dollars for fried equipment.

    and for the record, without proper grounding surge protectors do not work that well and are mostly just expensive extension cords in most cases.

    so until proper measures are taken, every time there is a lightning storm coming, unplug whatever it is you do not want to have fried, s7abo el berrad, shilo el TV, taffo el computer, w unplug that ishtirak ethernet cable which acts like a paratonnaire with the minor distinction that it routs every lightning strike in the area straight into your router not away from your home. maybe that should find its way into our laws and regulations instead of mandatory safety measures.
    Not all engineers skip on safety requirements, at least not us civil/structural engineers.
    I don't know about Electrical engineers, but in structural design of any project we have to follow the applicable design codes that includes plenty of safety factors regarding the loads and strength of concrete for example.
     
    Dark Angel

    Dark Angel

    Legendary Member
    Not all engineers skip on safety requirements, at least not us civil/structural engineers.
    I don't know about Electrical engineers, but in structural design of any project we have to follow the applicable design codes that includes plenty of safety factors regarding the loads and strength of concrete for example.
    actually the proper grounding begins with civil engineering as you need to properly dig for embedding the wires deep into the ground underneath the building, without that it is impossible to do the proper wiring.

    no need to get on the defensive, everyone is at fault here, starting from the owner. but here is something you can do, next time you are working on a project, bring it to the attention of those involved, maybe that could make some difference, and with enough people pushing for these changes, they will become a reality.
     
    Libnene Qu7

    Libnene Qu7

    Super Ultra Senior Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    actually the proper grounding begins with civil engineering as you need to properly dig for embedding the wires deep into the ground underneath the building, without that it is impossible to do the proper wiring.

    no need to get on the defensive, everyone is at fault here, starting from the owner. but here is something you can do, next time you are working on a project, bring it to the attention of those involved, maybe that could make some difference, and with enough people pushing for these changes, they will become a reality.
    My first job as a civil engineer after graduating and after jeish was a site engineer on a project in downtown called Beirut Tower. And I remember clearly we dug deep in the ground for the earth cable. At the time I had no idea what it was, but learned on the job.

    I've been away from Lebanon since 2005, but I remember almost all our codes follow the French system, sometimes a hybrid of French and British. It would be starnge to skimp on this.
     
    The Blind Monk

    The Blind Monk

    Your will, my hands.
    Orange Room Supporter
    actually the proper grounding begins with civil engineering as you need to properly dig for embedding the wires deep into the ground underneath the building, without that it is impossible to do the proper wiring.

    no need to get on the defensive, everyone is at fault here, starting from the owner. but here is something you can do, next time you are working on a project, bring it to the attention of those involved, maybe that could make some difference, and with enough people pushing for these changes, they will become a reality.
    In the design process, we design and decide the level of the structure's foundations based on the provided MEP drawings in addition to the required soil bearing capacity. We do go below any required level MEP needs to lay down their pipes/ducts/sleeves.

    My first job as a civil engineer after graduating and after jeish was a site engineer on a project in downtown called Beirut Tower. And I remember clearly we dug deep in the ground for the earth cable. At the time I had no idea what it was, but learned on the job.

    I've been away from Lebanon since 2005, but I remember almost all our codes follow the French system, sometimes a hybrid of French and British. It would be starnge to skimp on this.
    Nowadays mostly work is done according to ACI, which is the american code.
     
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