The Environmental Effects of the COVID-19 Pandemic

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Dr. Strangelove

Dr. Strangelove

Nuclear War Expert
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The COVID-19 pandemic is the greatest challenge humanity has faced since World War II. Alongside the tragic loss of life and economic paralysis, however, comes an unexpected silver lining: lockdowns happening all over the globe are giving the ecosystem a much needed break.

This thread is dedicated to how nature is reacting to us staying at home, and how the pandemic will affect our environmental policies going forward.
 
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  • Dr. Strangelove

    Dr. Strangelove

    Nuclear War Expert
    Staff member
    Himalayas visible for first time in 30 years as pollution levels in India drop

    As the lockdown to stop the spread of coronavirus in India continues, pollution levels across much of the country have dropped sharply. Now some residents in northern India say they can see the snow-capped Himalayas 200 kilometres away for the first time in 30 years.

     
    Mrsrx

    Mrsrx

    Somehow a Member
    Staff member
    The silver lining to coronavirus lockdowns: Air quality is improving

    The pandemic response has cleared the air from Los Angeles to Wuhan, China

    Unfortunately the impact is temporary.

    The good news is that this is providing a real life simulation of how the planet and ecosystems would react if we are friendlier to the environnement and the rate of absorbtion of the oceans, forests, small particles dissipation ....

    Many many data points are being collected so we would know what to do next and have better simulations.
     
    Nonan

    Nonan

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    Orcas in the Calanques, dolphins in Venice canals, dare I say more?
     
    Dr. Strangelove

    Dr. Strangelove

    Nuclear War Expert
    Staff member
    Coronavirus: Lockdowns continue to suppress European pollution

    From the article:
    New data confirms the improvement in air quality over Europe - a byproduct of the coronavirus crisis.

    The maps on this page track changes in nitrogen dioxide (NO2) - a pollutant that comes principally from the use of fossil fuels.

    Lockdown policies and the resulting reductions in economic activity have seen emissions take a steep dive.

    The maps were produced by the Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI).

    The Dutch met office leads the Tropomi instrument on the Copernicus Sentinel-5P satellite, which monitors a number of atmospheric gases, including NO2.
    Article contains more information and some interesting satellite images.
     
    Dr. Strangelove

    Dr. Strangelove

    Nuclear War Expert
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    Orcas in the Calanques, dolphins in Venice canals, dare I say more?
    Unfortunately, those dolphins in Venice turned out to be fake. Here's a good piece on the social phenomenon of spreading fake animal triumph news during the pandemic:

    It is true, however, that the Venice waters are as clear as they've ever been thanks to decreased traffic in the canals - which also means less air pollution due to canal boats:
     
    Dr. Strangelove

    Dr. Strangelove

    Nuclear War Expert
    Staff member
    Dr. Strangelove

    Dr. Strangelove

    Nuclear War Expert
    Staff member
    Air pollution drops 30% in Northeast US as coronavirus lockdown slows travel: NASA
    • The northeastern U.S. has seen atmospheric levels of nitrogen dioxide air pollution decline by 30% in March compared with the same period last year in the wake of coronavirus lockdowns, according to new satellite data from NASA.
    • Nitrogen dioxide levels, which are influenced primarily by car and truck emissions and electricity production, have also declined over major polluting cities such as Seattle, Los Angeles, Atlanta, New York and Chicago.
    • Scientists warn against celebrating any short-term benefits from the air pollution drop in the U.S. and across the world, since pollution levels will rebound once pandemic restrictions are lifted.
    Full article after the link:
     
    D

    dripstraws

    Member
    Indeed! "Nature is taking a breath when the rest of us are holding ours." The outbreak of COVID-19 may be stressful for people. Fear and anxiety about a disease can be overwhelming and cause strong emotions in adults and children. Coping with stress will make you, the people you care about, and your community stronger. Together we can fight COVID with a healthy mind, keep safe everyone.
     
    B

    baublebake

    New Member
    Mother earth is healing but humanity is endangered. Stay healthy and be vigilant.
     
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