The Levant’s DNA mosaic

Steven Gerrard

Active Member
Orange Room Supporter

Savo

Well-Known Member
Orange Room Supporter
this timeline refer to my DNA .

Your ancestral timeline / Journey through time! Below is a timeline of samples you match either by ancestry or by sharing direct DNA segments.

Red lines (matching the red dots on your ancestral maps) are your matching samples.
Blue lines (matching the blue dots on your ancestral maps) are your matching samples which are identified to a specific civilization.
Yellow lines (representing deep dive direct matches) are samples you share direct DNA segments with in cM.

1602403929266.jpeg
 

Steven Gerrard

Active Member
Orange Room Supporter
@SAVO

Eurogenes K13 ancient






































































































6.34556538 R1547_Lazio_Rome_Roman_Imperial
6.68169140 R42_Lazio_Rome_Roman_Imperial
7.51697413 R1550_Lazio_Rome_Roman_Imperial
7.77232269 R76_Lazio_Rome_Roman_Imperial
7.79549870 R70_Lazio_Rome_Roman_Imperial
9.42256335 65_Lebanon_Canaanite_MBA.SG_3650_ybp
9.62501429 54_Lebanon_Canaanite_MBA.SG_3770_ybp
10.32945303 Sidon_BA_ERS1790730_
10.34639551 Canaanite_ERS1790730_
11.39500768 R41_Lazio_Rome_Roman_Imperial
11.46229471 R130_Lazio_Rome_Italy_Late_Antiquity
11.82734121 MA2210_Anatolia_EBA.SG_4700_ybp
12.07639847 R126_Lazio_Frosinone_Roman_Imperial
12.20693655 63_Lebanon_Canaanite_MBA.SG_3650_ybp
12.61791583 R68_Lazio_Rome_Roman_Imperial
12.71412600 R38_Lazio_Rome_Roman_Imperial
12.99389857 R73_Lazio_Rome_Roman_Imperial
13.16435338 MA2213_Anatolia_EBA.SG_4700_ybp
13.38393066 R75_Lazio_Rome_Roman_Imperial
13.43680021 75_Lebanon_Canaanite_MBA.SG_3750_ybp
13.49102665 R115_Lazio_Rome_Roman_Imperial
13.85836931 MA2205_Anatolia_MLBA.SG_3800_ybp
13.94309865 R34_Lazio_Rome_Early_Medieval_Italy
14.16938601 caananite_ERS1790733_caananite_ERS1790733_
14.16938601 Canaanite_
 

Savo

Well-Known Member
Orange Room Supporter
@SAVO

Eurogenes K13 ancient






































































































6.34556538 R1547_Lazio_Rome_Roman_Imperial
6.68169140 R42_Lazio_Rome_Roman_Imperial
7.51697413 R1550_Lazio_Rome_Roman_Imperial
7.77232269 R76_Lazio_Rome_Roman_Imperial
7.79549870 R70_Lazio_Rome_Roman_Imperial
9.42256335 65_Lebanon_Canaanite_MBA.SG_3650_ybp
9.62501429 54_Lebanon_Canaanite_MBA.SG_3770_ybp
10.32945303 Sidon_BA_ERS1790730_
10.34639551 Canaanite_ERS1790730_
11.39500768 R41_Lazio_Rome_Roman_Imperial
11.46229471 R130_Lazio_Rome_Italy_Late_Antiquity
11.82734121 MA2210_Anatolia_EBA.SG_4700_ybp
12.07639847 R126_Lazio_Frosinone_Roman_Imperial
12.20693655 63_Lebanon_Canaanite_MBA.SG_3650_ybp
12.61791583 R68_Lazio_Rome_Roman_Imperial
12.71412600 R38_Lazio_Rome_Roman_Imperial
12.99389857 R73_Lazio_Rome_Roman_Imperial
13.16435338 MA2213_Anatolia_EBA.SG_4700_ybp
13.38393066 R75_Lazio_Rome_Roman_Imperial
13.43680021 75_Lebanon_Canaanite_MBA.SG_3750_ybp
13.49102665 R115_Lazio_Rome_Roman_Imperial
13.85836931 MA2205_Anatolia_MLBA.SG_3800_ybp
13.94309865 R34_Lazio_Rome_Early_Medieval_Italy
14.16938601 caananite_ERS1790733_caananite_ERS1790733_
14.16938601 Canaanite_
is that your result ??
 

Myso

Active Member
Orange Room Supporter
@Steven Gerrard Interesting results. I think this establishes that @SAVO's results are atypical (he's from a Druze origin), while you're from a more Arabian origin (Palestine - Jordan - Syria - Lebanon's Arab tribes).

I believe Savo and I are more Amorite than Caananite, in that sense.
 

Steven Gerrard

Active Member
Orange Room Supporter
The Old Arabs were located South Syria and North Jordan (where you find the oldest Arabic inscriptions). That's basically Arabistan.

Figured as much, was also looking at why high frequency Iran/Caucasus.

funny thing is I don't look Arab, people mistake me for a European ?
 
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Savo

Well-Known Member
Orange Room Supporter
My Eurogenes K13 updated























































































































































































































Distance to:​
DAS​
6.13059540​
Iraqi_Jew
6.41536437​
Lebanese_Muslim
6.52816207​
Nusayri
6.71259264​
Kurdish_Jewish
6.84330330​
Lebanese_Druze
8.48731995​
Lebanese_Christian
8.61307146​
Mandean
8.72058484​
Assyrian_West
9.07888209​
Assyrian_South
9.09784590​
Syrian
9.59731212​
Assyrian_North
10.55354443​
Samaritan
11.13211570​
Mountain_Jew_Chechnya
11.13959604​
Jordanian
11.41120064​
Palestinian
12.01208558​
Cyprian
12.01208558​
Greek_Cypriot
12.68817560​
Iraqi_Baghdad
13.18500664​
Greek_Cappadocian
14.03015681​
Georgian_Jewish
14.03132923​
Armenian_West
14.16456494​
Turk_Cypriot
16.00210611​
Armenian
16.33466865​
Greek_Trabzon
17.16136067​
Greek_Caucasus
17.28245064​
Turkmen_Iraq
17.99828325​
Bedouin
18.03566744​
Armenian_East
18.19744488​
Turk_South_East
18.30808565​
Turkish_mixed
18.50071890​
Tunisian_Jewish
18.65044503​
Turk_Central_East
19.25168564​
Libyan_Jewish
19.65949135​
Turk_East
19.70314442​
Greek_Dodecanese
19.76792604​
Turk_Turkey_average
19.94916540​
Greek_Chios
20.25611513​
Greek_Symi_Island
20.58919620​
Turk_Central_West
20.71861482​
Turk_East_Black_Sea
20.75047469​
Kurd_Sorani
20.77344459​
Azeri
20.90290171​
Kurd_Kurmanji_Turkey
20.94421161​
Sephardic_Jewish
21.04558148​
Turk_Central_Black_Sea
21.39315311​
Turk_Anatolia
21.45016550​
Turk_South
21.56114329​
Zaza
21.77777996​
Azerbaijani_Turkey
21.93410814​
Azerbaijani_Iran
21.96461928​
Kurd_Iran
22.49120717​
Greek_Crete
22.62891955​
Lor_Iran
22.67357052​
Kurdish
22.68051146​
Iranian
22.79691426​
Italian_Jewish
23.07461376​
Greek_North_Aegean
23.11686397​
Algerian_Jewish
23.15559760​
IT_Calabria
23.63400093​
Talysh
23.64473091​
Egyptian
23.86312008​
IT_Calabria_ultra
24.42704034​
IT_Calabria_citra
24.68554233​
Laz
24.75740899​
Malta
25.36079849​
Ashkenazi
25.85083944​
Moroccan_Jew
25.93575717​
Turk_North_West
26.12490000​
Turk_Meskhetian
26.13895369​
IT_Campania
 

Rafidi

Legendary Member
My new updated 23andme results

not sure what happened!!?

@SAVO @Ice Tea @Rafidi @Myso @Xynus87

View attachment 21878

I heard that some Druze families were once Shia too. And due to persecution had to convert, since the Druze were in good terms with the Ottomans. And same with some Christian families, since Christians were treated more fairly by the Ottomans as People of the Book than the Shia, regarded as heretics were.
 

Xynus87

New Member
I heard that some Druze families were once Shia too. And due to persecution had to convert, since the Druze were in good terms with the Ottomans. And same with some Christian families, since Christians were treated more fairly by the Ottomans as People of the Book than the Shia, regarded as heretics were.
Druze faith itself stems from Ismaili Shiism, which was quite common in Lebanon. Eventually most Ismailis either became Twelvers or Druze at the time of Fatimid weakness and Frankish rule.
 

Xynus87

New Member
My new updated 23andme results

not sure what happened!!?

@SAVO @Ice Tea @Rafidi @Myso @Xynus87

View attachment 21878
Looks very normal, and cool! Congrats! Don't forget that these percentages are estimates and should NOT be taken for granted. These commercial tests examine your genetic similarity, and clearly you're most similar to Levantines since you are one yourself (Lebanese). Egyptian and Arabian are most likely due to ancient connections and not recent. You should upload your results to gedmatch.
What haplogroups did they assign you?

Edit: Just saw your older post. J-CTS5368 is J1 and SAVO already told you. Where are you from?
 

Xynus87

New Member
I'm a bit too shy to make a new post about genetics when people are dealing with more important stuff for their everyday life, so here the post goes. (I will summarize the study using my own words and excerpts from the study, differentiated) (Images are from Mark Haber's studies of 2020 and possibly 2017).

A Genetic History of the Near East from an aDNA Time Course Sampling Eight Points in the Past 4,000 Years

Marc Haber; Joyce Nassar; Mohamed A. Almarri; Tina Saupe; Lehti Saag; Samuel J.Griffith; Claude Doumet-Serhal; Julien Chanteau; Muntaha Saghieh-Beydoun; Yali Xue; Christiana L. Scheib; Chris Tyler-Smith

Published on 28th of May, 2020 on CellPress

So here's what happened:


"To address these questions, we have now sequenced the genomes of ancient individuals who lived between 800 BCE and 200 CE at one of four different time periods: the Iron Age II (1000–539 BCE), the Iron Age III (539–330 BCE), the Hellenistic period (330–31 BCE), and the early Roman period (31 BCE–200 CE) (Table 1). These data, together with previous data we generated from individuals from the same region from the Middle Bronze Age (2100–1550 BCE), the late Roman period (200–634 CE), the Crusader period (1099–1291 CE), and the present-day provide a genetic representation of the Near East in a time series spanning the past 4,000 years (Table S1). We sampled the petrous portion of the temporal bones from 67 individuals buried in Beirut [..]"


This is pretty clear, authors sampled 67 individuals who lived in Beirut over different periods of time (Iron age, Hellenistic "Greek" and early Roman periods). They combined the data obtained from these individuals with individuals from other periods (Bronze age, late Roman and Crusader periods). They moved on to modern individuals:

"We combined the new data with published ancient and modern data, creating two datasets: set 1 included 2,012 modern humans 1,11, 12, 13, 14 and 914 ancient individuals 6,15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 with 815,791 SNPs, and set 2 consisted of 2,788 modern humans 24,38,39 and 914 ancient individuals with 539,766 SNPs (see Supplemental Methods)."

So, the method was that they used ancient individuals from different regions and areas and cultural spheres, and used them as the source for ancestry of modern-day Lebanese to check the contributions from groups related to these ancient individuals.

What they found was of course, not shocking nor surprising:

"The graph supports the results reported here, showing substantial genetic continuity in Lebanon since the Bronze Age interrupted by three significant admixture events during the Iron Age, Hellenistic period, and Ottoman period."

This was basically known since the 2017 paper on the Sidonian (Canaanite but could be less likely an Amorite) individuals who lived in the Middle Bronze age (2100-1550 BCE). ALL Lebanese people show this regardless of sect or religion:

j.p.248242474.png

BUT, What were the 3 significant admixture events?

"We found that the Lebanese Iron Age population can be modeled as a mixture of the local Bronze Age population (63%–88%) and a population related to ancient Anatolians or ancient South-Eastern Europeans (12%–37%)"

Who's the source of this ancestry? In my opinion: It's complicated. The authors here suggest it's from the Sea Peoples, truth is it's more likely to have been introduced from different contributing people or one. Mitanni, Hittites, Sea Peoples and Achaemenid Persians are all candidates. But until then, we'd need more DNA from these people. All these peoples would have been ancestral in one way or another to Lebanese people.

What about the second admixture event?

"We found that the Hellenistic and early Roman population can be modeled as a mixture of the local population, Beirut_IA (88%–94%), and a Central/South Asian population (6%–12%)"

So this ancestry came in during Hellenistic and Roman periods, which means it's most likely came from Indian merchants coming to the Levant and Lebanon specifically. However there's something that happened before the third and last major admixture event!

"From the late Roman period to the medieval period, we detect an increase in African ancestry (Figure S11B), but that increase remains slightly below statistical significance (Z score = −2.4) and accounts for ∼2.9% of Lebanon_Medieval’s ancestry when ancient East Africans are used in the admixture model"

This implies East African ancestry was already present in very small amounts, but increased in the medieval era, so this is likely from the trans-Saharan slave trade! As we already know, the crusaders didn't leave much genetic input, and their effect seems to be very insignificant for Christians, Muslims and Druze alike!

Now, the third and last major admixture event detected was:

"The final genetic change observed in Lebanon occurred after the Crusaders’ period but, as we showed previously,4 was not related to the Crusaders themselves. We found4 an increase in ancestry related to populations from the Caucasus and Turks in the modern Lebanese population after the medieval period (Figure S11C and Table S11). Using admixture-induced linkage disequilibrium (LD) decay,47,48 we show that admixture occurred around 1640–1740 CE when Lebanon was under Ottoman rule"

So the last significant even was introduction of ancestry from Turks and occurred around the time of the Ottoman rule.

CONCLUSION:
Our data capture the genetic outcome of some of these events but also show that the genetic composition of the general population was minimally affected and that great cultural transitions in the Near East were not in these cases matched by comparable genetic transitions. Yet, we show that the small genetic changes we detect when using ancient populations sampled from a time series have the power to provide information about past events with details that complement the available historical records.


Basically, Lebanese people all derive most of their ancestry from Bronze age Levantine populations, of course we know them as the Canaanites and later on the Phoenicians, and other groups around would have contributed as well such as Amorites, Eblaites, Aramaeans and whatnot.
Don't forget these groups themselves weren't exactly pristine, for example, they had ancestry from Kura-Araxes-related ancient peoples, later Hurro-Urartians, Mitanni and many other peoples.
Other related populations most likely from northern Mesopotamia also migrated to the region after 2200 BC but they still remain unsampled.
 
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Savo

Well-Known Member
Orange Room Supporter

Your closest Ancient populations...​

Canaanite / Semite + Safavid (6.263)
Safavid + Amorite (7.011)
Amorite (8.479)
Canaanite / Semite + Amorite (9.733)
Hittite + Safavid (10.86)
Hellenic Roman + Canaanite / Semite (11.38)
Canaanite / Semite (14.45)
Hittite (17.96)
Hellenic Roman (18.68)

The Amorites were nomads originating in Canaan and northwestern Syria who migrated into Mesopotamia bringing an advanced culture. The word Amorite derives from the Akkadian term Amurrum which means West. They spoke a Semitic language and were first mentioned in Sumerian text from 2500 BC as nomadic invaders who ate raw meat and did not bury their dead. This view changed quickly as Amorites began establishing villages in the region and became a threat to the Akkadian leader Sargon the Great who defeated them. After the fall of the Akkadian Empire the Amorites began to seize control of the cities in the region including Larsa, Kish, Sippar and Babylon. They intermingled with the local Baylonian people and even worshipped their gods. Perhaps the most famous Amorite King was Hammurabi who spread Babylonian culture throughout the Near East.
Amorite_Migration.jpg


Canaan was the key Semitic-speaking region in the Ancient Near East around 2000 BC corresponding to the Levant in the Bible. This includes the area of Phoenicia, Israel, Philistia and other nations. All people in this region shared the similiar languages, culture and ethnic background - this included the Israelites, Moabites, Phoenicians and Ammonites. Archaeological and linguistic evidence shows the Kingdom of Israel and Kingdom of Judah represented a subset of Canaanite culture.
In the Bronze Age, cities like Jerusalem were large and important walled settlements. The Egyptian Pharaoh Rameses II had to campaign vigorously in Canaan to maintain Egyptian power. Egyptians setup permanent fortress garrisons in Moab and Ammon.
During the Iron Age, southern Canaan was dominated by the kingdoms of Israel and Judah, as well as the Philistine city-states on the Mediterranean coast. Northern Canaan was divided into Syro-Hittite states and Phoenician city-states. The entire region was conquered by the Assyrian Empire from the 10th century BC until the 7th century BC. Then the Babylonians took control followed by the Persians. In 332 BC, Alexander The Great conquered Canaan. in the 2nd century BC Rome took control, and then later Byzantium folllowed by the Arab Islamic invasion in the 7th century.
Canaanite_Migration.jpg


The Safavid Dynasty was one of the most significant ruling dynasties in Iran. At their height, they controlled the modern nations of Iran, Azerbaijan, Bahrain, Armenia, eastern Georgia, Iraq, Kuwait, Afghanistan and parts of Turkey, Syria, Pakistan, Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan. It is believed the Safavid family hailed from Iranian Kurdistan and later moved to Azerbaijan. The dynasty was from the very start intermarried with both Pontic Greek and Georgian lines. After the decline of the Timurid Empire, the Safavid dynasty was founded by Shah Ismail. He was the last in the line of hereditary Grand Masters of the Safaviyeh order. His expansionistic approach put the dynasty in direct conflict with the Ottoman Empire as they vied for control of parts of Anatolia. The highest level in the government was the Prime Minister or Grand Vizier who would be chosen among doctors of law. Public land was under the rule of local governors or Khans. The favorite language at the court and in the army was Persian Turkish due to the Turkic origins of the Safavid dynasty.
Safavid_Migration.jpg


The Hittites were an Anatolian people who played an important role in establishing an empire centered on Hattusa in north-central Anatolia around 1600 BC. This empire reached its height during the mid-14th century BC under Suppiluliuma I, when it encompassed an area that included most of Anatolia as well as parts of the northern Levant and Upper Mesopotamia. Between the 15th and 13th centuries BC, the Empire of Hattusa, conventionally called the Hittite Empire, came into conflict with the Egyptian Empire, Middle Assyrian Empire and the empire of the Mitanni for control of the Near East. The Assyrians eventually emerged as the dominant power and annexed much of the Hittite empire, while the remainder was sacked by Phrygian newcomers to the region. After c. 1180 BC, during the Bronze Age collapse, the Hittites splintered into several independent Neo-Hittite city-states, some of which survived until the 8th century BC before succumbing to the Neo-Assyrian Empire.



1604186622923.png
Hundreds of years before the traditional founding of Rome (753 BC), Greeks began to colonize southern Italy. They established themselves along the coast of Sicily, and on the littoral of the regions now known as Campania, Calabria, Apulia and Basilicata. The Romans would later refer to this territory, which includes the toe of the boot of Italy, as Magna Graecia (Greater Greece). The settlers brought Hellenic civilization including Greek-style democracy and the Greek language to this land, interacted with the native Italic tribes, and had a lasting impact on the developing culture of Rome. The Hellenic cities were eventually absorbed into the Roman Republic. Naples, the Greek Neapolis, became Roman in 327 BC. Sicily, which was initially populated by Phoenicians and by their colony Carthage, was also heavily colonized and settled by Greeks. Syracuse, on the south-eastern coast of Sicily, was the most populous Greek city in the world by the 3rd century BC. All of Sicily was Roman by 212 BC, conquered during the Punic Wars against Carthage.
RomanSouth_Migration.jpg
 
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Savo

Well-Known Member
Orange Room Supporter

Your closest Ancient populations...​

Canaanite / Semite + Safavid (6.263)
Safavid + Amorite (7.011)
Amorite (8.479)
Canaanite / Semite + Amorite (9.733)
Hittite + Safavid (10.86)
Hellenic Roman + Canaanite / Semite (11.38)
Canaanite / Semite (14.45)
Hittite (17.96)
Hellenic Roman (18.68)

The Amorites were nomads originating in Canaan and northwestern Syria who migrated into Mesopotamia bringing an advanced culture. The word Amorite derives from the Akkadian term Amurrum which means West. They spoke a Semitic language and were first mentioned in Sumerian text from 2500 BC as nomadic invaders who ate raw meat and did not bury their dead. This view changed quickly as Amorites began establishing villages in the region and became a threat to the Akkadian leader Sargon the Great who defeated them. After the fall of the Akkadian Empire the Amorites began to seize control of the cities in the region including Larsa, Kish, Sippar and Babylon. They intermingled with the local Baylonian people and even worshipped their gods. Perhaps the most famous Amorite King was Hammurabi who spread Babylonian culture throughout the Near East.
Amorite_Migration.jpg


Canaan was the key Semitic-speaking region in the Ancient Near East around 2000 BC corresponding to the Levant in the Bible. This includes the area of Phoenicia, Israel, Philistia and other nations. All people in this region shared the similiar languages, culture and ethnic background - this included the Israelites, Moabites, Phoenicians and Ammonites. Archaeological and linguistic evidence shows the Kingdom of Israel and Kingdom of Judah represented a subset of Canaanite culture.
In the Bronze Age, cities like Jerusalem were large and important walled settlements. The Egyptian Pharaoh Rameses II had to campaign vigorously in Canaan to maintain Egyptian power. Egyptians setup permanent fortress garrisons in Moab and Ammon.
During the Iron Age, southern Canaan was dominated by the kingdoms of Israel and Judah, as well as the Philistine city-states on the Mediterranean coast. Northern Canaan was divided into Syro-Hittite states and Phoenician city-states. The entire region was conquered by the Assyrian Empire from the 10th century BC until the 7th century BC. Then the Babylonians took control followed by the Persians. In 332 BC, Alexander The Great conquered Canaan. in the 2nd century BC Rome took control, and then later Byzantium folllowed by the Arab Islamic invasion in the 7th century.
Canaanite_Migration.jpg


The Safavid Dynasty was one of the most significant ruling dynasties in Iran. At their height, they controlled the modern nations of Iran, Azerbaijan, Bahrain, Armenia, eastern Georgia, Iraq, Kuwait, Afghanistan and parts of Turkey, Syria, Pakistan, Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan. It is believed the Safavid family hailed from Iranian Kurdistan and later moved to Azerbaijan. The dynasty was from the very start intermarried with both Pontic Greek and Georgian lines. After the decline of the Timurid Empire, the Safavid dynasty was founded by Shah Ismail. He was the last in the line of hereditary Grand Masters of the Safaviyeh order. His expansionistic approach put the dynasty in direct conflict with the Ottoman Empire as they vied for control of parts of Anatolia. The highest level in the government was the Prime Minister or Grand Vizier who would be chosen among doctors of law. Public land was under the rule of local governors or Khans. The favorite language at the court and in the army was Persian Turkish due to the Turkic origins of the Safavid dynasty.
Safavid_Migration.jpg


The Hittites were an Anatolian people who played an important role in establishing an empire centered on Hattusa in north-central Anatolia around 1600 BC. This empire reached its height during the mid-14th century BC under Suppiluliuma I, when it encompassed an area that included most of Anatolia as well as parts of the northern Levant and Upper Mesopotamia. Between the 15th and 13th centuries BC, the Empire of Hattusa, conventionally called the Hittite Empire, came into conflict with the Egyptian Empire, Middle Assyrian Empire and the empire of the Mitanni for control of the Near East. The Assyrians eventually emerged as the dominant power and annexed much of the Hittite empire, while the remainder was sacked by Phrygian newcomers to the region. After c. 1180 BC, during the Bronze Age collapse, the Hittites splintered into several independent Neo-Hittite city-states, some of which survived until the 8th century BC before succumbing to the Neo-Assyrian Empire.



View attachment 21997
Hundreds of years before the traditional founding of Rome (753 BC), Greeks began to colonize southern Italy. They established themselves along the coast of Sicily, and on the littoral of the regions now known as Campania, Calabria, Apulia and Basilicata. The Romans would later refer to this territory, which includes the toe of the boot of Italy, as Magna Graecia (Greater Greece). The settlers brought Hellenic civilization including Greek-style democracy and the Greek language to this land, interacted with the native Italic tribes, and had a lasting impact on the developing culture of Rome. The Hellenic cities were eventually absorbed into the Roman Republic. Naples, the Greek Neapolis, became Roman in 327 BC. Sicily, which was initially populated by Phoenicians and by their colony Carthage, was also heavily colonized and settled by Greeks. Syracuse, on the south-eastern coast of Sicily, was the most populous Greek city in the world by the 3rd century BC. All of Sicily was Roman by 212 BC, conquered during the Punic Wars against Carthage.
RomanSouth_Migration.jpg
this confirm that i have phoenician ancestory ..

the fact that connec canaanite and hellenic roman to my roots its due to phenician expansion in the mediterranean !


1604187277555.png

Your closest genetic modern populations...​




1. Lebanese_Muslim (6.532)
2. Sephardic_Jewish (7.286)
3. Iranian_Jewish (7.474)
4. Kurdish_Jewish (7.567)
5. Assyrian (9.377)
6. Syrian (9.653)
7. Lebanese_Christian (9.872)
8. Lebanese_Druze (10.94)


1604187643989.png
 
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