Traveling to live and work in france

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  • Skunk

    Skunk

    Active Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    True i once went out wuth a french girl who had more hair on her arms thsn i do, and i’m a hairy bastard. Many jameson glasses were needed.

    But thats an exception to the rule, unless ur french connection had som arab roots
    Also
    I admire your taste in whiskey ?
     
    Nonan

    Nonan

    Well-Known Member
    Being French does give him an advantage. By and large the answer is a yes.
    So you’re not french, have not worked in France, however you want to provide your opinion, misinterpreting other people’s posts and trying to seemingly contradict those who have lived there / are French?
     
    Muki

    Muki

    Well-Known Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    The French can be pretty hairy, too. (Speaking from experience).
    True i once went out wuth a french girl who had more hair on her arms thsn i do, and i’m a hairy bastard. Many jameson glasses were needed.

    But thats an exception to the rule, unless ur french connection had som arab roots
    French female with hairy armpits
    At first i thought it was a rumor till
    I’ve witnessed it myself

    How common is that
    @HenryFa getting advice on all fronts :lol:
     
    H

    HenryFa

    New Member
    @HenryFa getting advice on all fronts :lol:
    After reading the post about the armpit hair, staying in Lebanon might not be a bad idea after all :lol:.

    In all seriousness, the discussion is helping me massively. I’m glad i found this forum. :p
     
    J

    joseph_lubnan

    Legendary Member
    So you’re not french, have not worked in France, however you want to provide your opinion, misinterpreting other people’s posts and trying to seemingly contradict those who have lived there / are French?
    Of course, you're not going to convince anyone that being a citizen of a country doesn't afford a big advantage towards residing, working, and studying, and gaining access to scholarships and services. :) it's rather trivial :)
     
    JustLeb

    JustLeb

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    Of course, you're not going to convince anyone that being a citizen of a country doesn't afford a big advantage towards residing, working, and studying, and gaining access to scholarships and services. :) it's rather trivial :)
    actually once a resident you have all the rights of the citizens except voting, but the annoying thing is that you have to pass several hours each year at the prefecture to renew your resident card, and sometimes you might need to return because some papers are missing.
    As for students, they can have scholarship at least if they are doing Masters or PhD, although I was never a student, but my wife did her PhD in France and she got a scholarship, and she was paid to do the research.
    PS. most universities in France are supported by the state, so the tuition is low
     
    Nonan

    Nonan

    Well-Known Member
    actually once a resident you have all the rights of the citizens except voting, but the annoying thing is that you have to pass several hours each year at the prefecture to renew your resident card, and sometimes you might need to return because some papers are missing.
    As for students, they can have scholarship at least if they are doing Masters or PhD, although I was never a student, but my wife did her PhD in France and she got a scholarship, and she was paid to do the research.
    PS. most universities in France are supported by the state, so the tuition is low
    Shou fahammak? Nata’ @joseph_lubnan zakaria.

    Have you seen this clip from France 4 about the guy debating with his friend about what his GF meant when she said “j t’aime plus”? It’s all over Facebook but can’t seem to be able to post it here.

    Perfect summary
     
    JustLeb

    JustLeb

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    Shou fahammak? Nata’ @joseph_lubnan zakaria.

    Have you seen this clip from France 4 about the guy debating with his friend about what his GF meant when she said “j t’aime plus”? It’s all over Facebook but can’t seem to be able to post it here.

    Perfect summary
    No, I didn't..
    But I saw live the two motorcyclists who bumped into each other when doing the show in front of Macron :D
     
    J

    joseph_lubnan

    Legendary Member
    actually once a resident you have all the rights of the citizens except voting, but the annoying thing is that you have to pass several hours each year at the prefecture to renew your resident card, and sometimes you might need to return because some papers are missing.
    As for students, they can have scholarship at least if they are doing Masters or PhD, although I was never a student, but my wife did her PhD in France and she got a scholarship, and she was paid to do the research.
    PS. most universities in France are supported by the state, so the tuition is low
    Once a resident is a big statement. Students are not residents and at least have limitations on amount of work, type of scholarships etc. Correct me if I'm wrong. Aside from red tape and filing paperwork, and the non permanent nature of any engagement by a company with a non resident, and the additional paperwork the company has to do...

    Yes citizens have an advantage absolutely with an effing in the middle :)
     
    Last edited:
    J

    joseph_lubnan

    Legendary Member
    Shou fahammak? Nata’ @joseph_lubnan zakaria.

    Have you seen this clip from France 4 about the guy debating with his friend about what his GF meant when she said “j t’aime plus”? It’s all over Facebook but can’t seem to be able to post it here.

    Perfect summary
    Lol is your opinion a citizen is exactly like a non citizen or non permanent resident, no ****ing difference? :)

    "Pack up and go to France as a student, you become exactly like a citizen and a permanent resident" is that your genius opinion? :)
     
    mrsrx

    mrsrx

    Newish Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    I am a 20 year old NDU NLC student (computer science, 3rd year). I graduate before summer of 2019 (less than a year from now).
    I have maintained a gpa of 3.9, and have a lot of experience through multiple internships at good companies.

    I am planning on going to France to study there (masters degree) AND work. Work is more important since i need a source of income.
    When i say work, i mean work in the computer science field, and not in some random mcdonalds.

    Now here's the catch: I'm a french citizen. I have the nationality from my father.

    I would like to know what are the benefits of the nationality, like, what sets me apart from another lebanese student going to france to work/study.
    so i'll just list my questions:
    1. How beneficial is my French ID for studying, working and living in france
    2. what sets me apart from a normal lebanese student trying to study/work in france
    3. How good is france really? like how good is it concerning computer science and all...
    4. what is the necessary paperwork and accolades to work/study/live in france? do i need to do some sort of french test etc...
    As you can tell i am pretty naive lol, hence why i resorted to the forum. Also, if i'm posting in the wrong section i apologize. I'm new here.
    Thank you for your time.
    Did not have the time to read all the replies on the thread...In France you have the grandes ecoles system...Even if it does not always guarantee the best education, the best learning experience, the best results, the best anything...Companies in France will always prioritize students coming from the better schools...
    If you can get a X, Mines, Central, Telecom Paris, Supelec Paris... or any other big big name school it will help as you will have a higher entry salary and years after people will still describe you by the school you did ...some kind of elitism if you can get in it is always better.
     
    mrsrx

    mrsrx

    Newish Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    Once a resident is a big statement. Students are not residents and at least have limitations on amount of work, type of scholarships etc. Correct me if I'm wrong. Aside from red tape and filing paperwork, and the non permanent nature of any engagement by a company with a non resident, and the additional paperwork the company has to do...

    Yes citizens have an advantage absolutely with an effing in the middle :)
    You have the right to work up to 60% of your time as you are as student and do not have a work permit which is normal. But you get free education in public schools and pay only the registration and the secu like any french student, you have a priority to french dorms as your parents do not live in the city, you are entitled to CAF and securité sociale as well as any bourse you can apply to... In the eyes of the state you are treated very well like any French student!!!
    If you want to work more than 60% of your time then you are not learning much!

    As for the papers you had to renew yearly but i think the process now changed and they give you the whole period and for workers its 4 years instead of 1 in order to make the waits at the prefecture more bearable...if you base your decision on going to do paperwork once a year you are going in the wrong direction...as once every year or 2 you will spend that time for an "ekhraj ed 3a2ile, or tesjil siyara or whatever" in lebanon...

    We were treated extremely well and he has the nationality already so this is a non starter anyway
     
    L'arbalette

    L'arbalette

    Well-Known Member
    You have the right to work up to 60% of your time as you are as student and do not have a work permit which is normal. But you get free education in public schools and pay only the registration and the secu like any french student, you have a priority to french dorms as your parents do not live in the city, you are entitled to CAF and securité sociale as well as any bourse you can apply to... In the eyes of the state you are treated very well like any French student!!!
    If you want to work more than 60% of your time then you are not learning much!

    As for the papers you had to renew yearly but i think the process now changed and they give you the whole period and for workers its 4 years instead of 1 in order to make the waits at the prefecture more bearable...if you base your decision on going to do paperwork once a year you are going in the wrong direction...as once every year or 2 you will spend that time for an "ekhraj ed 3a2ile, or tesjil siyara or whatever" in lebanon...

    We were treated extremely well and he has the nationality already so this is a non starter anyway
    Shou fahmak... You are speaking from experience. Therefore, you're less capable of pontificating and asserting your truth without facts.
     
    Iron Maiden

    Iron Maiden

    Paragon of Bacon
    Staff member
    You have the right to work up to 60% of your time as you are as student and do not have a work permit which is normal. But you get free education in public schools and pay only the registration and the secu like any french student, you have a priority to french dorms as your parents do not live in the city, you are entitled to CAF and securité sociale as well as any bourse you can apply to... In the eyes of the state you are treated very well like any French student!!!
    If you want to work more than 60% of your time then you are not learning much!

    As for the papers you had to renew yearly but i think the process now changed and they give you the whole period and for workers its 4 years instead of 1 in order to make the waits at the prefecture more bearable...if you base your decision on going to do paperwork once a year you are going in the wrong direction...as once every year or 2 you will spend that time for an "ekhraj ed 3a2ile, or tesjil siyara or whatever" in lebanon...

    We were treated extremely well and he has the nationality already so this is a non starter anyway
    Your are downplaying the administration headaches a bit too much, i dont want to make it sound like its hell, but just domething someone who’s got the citizenship wint have to go through and thus a najor plus.
    I dont know abt hows it has become now, but when i was a stufent we had to do it tearly, and by yearly i mean every damn 8 months because of reasons
     
    mrsrx

    mrsrx

    Newish Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    Your are downplaying the administration headaches a bit too much, i dont want to make it sound like its hell, but just domething someone who’s got the citizenship wint have to go through and thus a najor plus.
    I dont know abt hows it has become now, but when i was a stufent we had to do it tearly, and by yearly i mean every damn 8 months because of reasons
    Yes, yearly and you had to take RDV keep that in mind, then go give your papers and surely you forgot one because they changed something and the go back to pick it up...Indeed...but it is a small price to pay is what i meant! everywhere in the world you have to deal with bureaucracy
    The point is it is not a showstopper and should be looked at as an inconvenience to a bigger benefit.
     
    Nonan

    Nonan

    Well-Known Member
    Your are downplaying the administration headaches a bit too much, i dont want to make it sound like its hell, but just domething someone who’s got the citizenship wint have to go through and thus a najor plus.
    I dont know abt hows it has become now, but when i was a stufent we had to do it tearly, and by yearly i mean every damn 8 months because of reasons
    I don't know when you were in France, but if it was in the 2000s, then shkor rabbak you no longer had the "Pasqua" laws. Not only did we have to wait in the Prefecture de Police for the renewal of the Carte de Sejour, but we also had to get a permit every time we were leaving France...

    French administration is notoriously annoying, and especially when dealing with foreigners. I've seen an agent humiliate an elderly couple of asian origins because their French was poor. It was despicable. There are better ways to treat other people.

    Having said that, unlike the US and the H1-B, your carte de sejour is yours, not your employers. And when you are legally present in France, you are afforded all the rights and guarantees a citizen has, in line with your status, and obviously short of voting. So no, being French doesn't give you a "wasta" to go into a school (it's all merit based), or a job (it's mostly based on your degree and how well you do in an interview -- assuming it's a white collar job).
     
    mrsrx

    mrsrx

    Newish Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    I don't know when you were in France, but if it was in the 2000s, then shkor rabbak you no longer had the "Pasqua" laws. Not only did we have to wait in the Prefecture de Police for the renewal of the Carte de Sejour, but we also had to get a permit every time we were leaving France...

    French administration is notoriously annoying, and especially when dealing with foreigners. I've seen an agent humiliate an elderly couple of asian origins because their French was poor. It was despicable. There are better ways to treat other people.

    Having said that, unlike the US and the H1-B, your carte de sejour is yours, not your employers. And when you are legally present in France, you are afforded all the rights and guarantees a citizen has, in line with your status, and obviously short of voting. So no, being French doesn't give you a "wasta" to go into a school (it's all merit based), or a job (it's mostly based on your degree and how well you do in an interview -- assuming it's a white collar job).
    Have not experienced what you are describing and not doubting that it was the case. I have been always very well treated even when i forgot stuff they made it work somehow or told me to email them later and they will print them. I might have been lucky, school/Job profile made them treat me decently or they have changed their ways! ....of course there is the possibility that i look like a greek god and they were just hypnotized :p

    I have noticed since I arrived here up until a short period ago things were moving in the right direction as they redid the prefecture and added a satisfaction survey, created waiting rooms and you do not have to wait by the stairs in Cité...
     
    Iron Maiden

    Iron Maiden

    Paragon of Bacon
    Staff member
    Yes, yearly and you had to take RDV keep that in mind, then go give your papers and surely you forgot one because they changed something and the go back to pick it up...Indeed...but it is a small price to pay is what i meant! everywhere in the world you have to deal with bureaucracy
    The point is it is not a showstopper and should be looked at as an inconvenience to a bigger benefit.
    3ala rase but the point was OP asked whats the difference between having the citizenship and not, and i told him that since he has it already his life is gonna be easier because of x and y.

    I don't know when you were in France, but if it was in the 2000s, then shkor rabbak you no longer had the "Pasqua" laws. Not only did we have to wait in the Prefecture de Police for the renewal of the Carte de Sejour, but we also had to get a permit every time we were leaving France...

    French administration is notoriously annoying, and especially when dealing with foreigners. I've seen an agent humiliate an elderly couple of asian origins because their French was poor. It was despicable. There are better ways to treat other people.

    Having said that, unlike the US and the H1-B, your carte de sejour is yours, not your employers. And when you are legally present in France, you are afforded all the rights and guarantees a citizen has, in line with your status, and obviously short of voting. So no, being French doesn't give you a "wasta" to go into a school (it's all merit based), or a job (it's mostly based on your degree and how well you do in an interview -- assuming it's a white collar job).
    I cannot comment abt the 2000s i came in 2012. But foreign students have become a source of much needed labor and they are starting to understand that and are somewhat pampering them. Campus france helps a lot and has become an extremly useful tool for students.

    Yes the citizenship gives u an edge when u have to apply for stuff and present id papers, and its fricking normal, people want to help/hire/mingle with their compatriots first.

    Look we each had our experiences lets leave at that.
     
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