Trump Announces "Middle East Peace Plan"

Rafidi

Legendary Member

Saudi prince strongly criticises Israel at Bahrain summit​


Prince Turki bin Faisal Al Saud stressed the importance of resolving the Palestinian-Israeli conflict with a two-state solution.

A prominent Saudi prince harshly criticised Israel at a Bahrain security summit that was remotely attended by Israel’s foreign minister, showing the challenges any further deals between Arab states and Israel face in the absence of an independent Palestinian state.

The fiery remarks by Prince Turki bin Faisal Al Saud at the Manama Dialogue appeared to catch Israel’s foreign minister off guard, particularly as Israelis receive warm welcomes from officials in Bahrain and the United Arab Emirates following agreements to normalise ties.

Left unresolved by those deals, however, is the decades-long conflict between Israel and the Palestinians. The Palestinians view those pacts as a stab in the back from their fellow Arabs and a betrayal of their cause.

Prince Turki bin Faisal opened his remarks by contrasting what he described as Israel’s perception of being “peace-loving upholders of high moral principles” versus what he described as a far-darker Palestinian reality of living under a “Western colonising” power.

Israel has “incarcerated [Palestinians] in concentration camps under the flimsiest of security accusations – young and old, women and men, who are rotting there without recourse to justice”, Prince Turki said.

“They are demolishing homes as they wish and they assassinate whomever they want.”

‘An open wound’

The prince also criticised Israel’s undeclared arsenal of nuclear weapons and the Israeli government’s “unleashing their political minions and their media outlets from other countries to denigrate and demonise Saudi Arabia”.

In unusually blunt language, he accused Israel of depicting itself as a “small, existentially threatened country, surrounded by bloodthirsty killers who want to eradicate her from existence”.

“And yet they profess that they want to be friends with Saudi Arabia,” he said.

The prince reiterated the kingdom’s official position that the solution lies in implementing the Arab Peace Initiative, a 2002 Saudi-sponsored deal that offers Israel full ties with all Arab states in return for Palestinian statehood on territory Israel captured in 1967.

He added: “You cannot treat an open wound with palliatives and pain killers.”

Israeli Foreign Minister Gabi Ashkenazi addresses via videoconference the Manama Dialogue security conference in Bahrain capital [Mazen Mahdi/AFP]Israeli Foreign Minister Gabi Ashkenazi, who spoke immediately after Prince Turki, said: “I would like to express my regret on the comments of the Saudi representative. I don’t believe that they reflect the spirit and the changes taking place in the Middle East.”


The confrontation and a later back-and-forth between Prince Turki and a confidant of Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu during the summit highlighted continued widespread opposition to Israel by many inside Saudi Arabia, despite some state-backed efforts to promote outreach with Jewish groups and supporters of Israel.

Ashkenazi, meanwhile, reiterated Israel’s position that it is the Palestinians who are to be blamed for not reaching a peace deal.

“We have a choice here with the Palestinians whether to solve it or not, or to go to this blame game,” said Ashkenazi, an ally of Netanyahu’s chief rival, Benny Gantz.

Dore Gold, a Netanyahu confidant and former UN ambassador in the audience, implied Prince Faisal’s remarks were “accusations of the past – many of which are false”.

The prince later brought up Gold’s previous television appearances “denigrating the kingdom and using the most vile descriptions”.

“I think Mr Dore Gold should be the last one to talk about having previous beliefs and positions here,” the prince said.

Prince Turki led Saudi intelligence for more than 20 years and served as ambassador to the United States and the United Kingdom.

Though he now holds no official position, his stance is seen as closely mirroring that of King Salman.

However, the king’s assertive son, the 35-year-old Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, is seen having a greater willingness to quietly engage with Israel to counter common rival Iran and boost foreign investment in the kingdom.

‘Not an easy ride’

Bahraini Foreign Minister Abdullatif al-Zayani, also on stage for the tense exchanges, sought to smooth over the differences in his remarks.

Still, he too stressed the importance of a resolution to the Palestinian-Israeli conflict based on a two-state solution as envisaged by the Arab Peace Initiative.

“The path of peace is not an easy ride. There will be a lot of obstacles along the way,” he said. “There will be ups and downs. But the bedrock of that path, the path of peace, is the Israeli-Palestinian issue.”

In an apparent reference to Iran, al-Zayani added a resolution to the conflict would also remove the pretext to justify some of the threats made to regional security.

Despite Prince Turki’s blunt rhetoric, mutual concern over Iran has gradually brought Israel and Gulf nations closer, and Riyadh itself has quietly been building relations with the Jewish state for several years.

Reports last month that Netanyahu had held secret talks in Saudi Arabia fuelled speculation that a normalisation accord with the Gulf’s top power could be in the making. Riyadh, however, denied the meeting occurred.

‘Need to see a settlement’

Saudi Foreign Minister Prince Faisal bin Farhan told the AFP news agency on Saturday the kingdom’s position remained resolute.

“We’ve been quite clear that in order for us to proceed with normalisation we will need to see a settlement of the Palestinian dispute and the formation of a viable state of Palestine along the lines envisioned in the 2002 Arab Peace Initiative,” he said in an interview in Manama.

Asked whether that effectively ruled out the establishment of ties with Israel any time soon, he said he was “optimistic that there is a path towards a resolution between the Palestinians and Israelis”.

 

divergent

New Member

Saudi prince strongly criticises Israel at Bahrain summit​


Prince Turki bin Faisal Al Saud stressed the importance of resolving the Palestinian-Israeli conflict with a two-state solution.

A prominent Saudi prince harshly criticised Israel at a Bahrain security summit that was remotely attended by Israel’s foreign minister, showing the challenges any further deals between Arab states and Israel face in the absence of an independent Palestinian state.

The fiery remarks by Prince Turki bin Faisal Al Saud at the Manama Dialogue appeared to catch Israel’s foreign minister off guard, particularly as Israelis receive warm welcomes from officials in Bahrain and the United Arab Emirates following agreements to normalise ties.

Left unresolved by those deals, however, is the decades-long conflict between Israel and the Palestinians. The Palestinians view those pacts as a stab in the back from their fellow Arabs and a betrayal of their cause.

Prince Turki bin Faisal opened his remarks by contrasting what he described as Israel’s perception of being “peace-loving upholders of high moral principles” versus what he described as a far-darker Palestinian reality of living under a “Western colonising” power.

Israel has “incarcerated [Palestinians] in concentration camps under the flimsiest of security accusations – young and old, women and men, who are rotting there without recourse to justice”, Prince Turki said.

“They are demolishing homes as they wish and they assassinate whomever they want.”

‘An open wound’

The prince also criticised Israel’s undeclared arsenal of nuclear weapons and the Israeli government’s “unleashing their political minions and their media outlets from other countries to denigrate and demonise Saudi Arabia”.

In unusually blunt language, he accused Israel of depicting itself as a “small, existentially threatened country, surrounded by bloodthirsty killers who want to eradicate her from existence”.

“And yet they profess that they want to be friends with Saudi Arabia,” he said.

The prince reiterated the kingdom’s official position that the solution lies in implementing the Arab Peace Initiative, a 2002 Saudi-sponsored deal that offers Israel full ties with all Arab states in return for Palestinian statehood on territory Israel captured in 1967.

He added: “You cannot treat an open wound with palliatives and pain killers.”

Israeli Foreign Minister Gabi Ashkenazi addresses via videoconference the Manama Dialogue security conference in Bahrain capital [Mazen Mahdi/AFP]Israeli Foreign Minister Gabi Ashkenazi, who spoke immediately after Prince Turki, said: “I would like to express my regret on the comments of the Saudi representative. I don’t believe that they reflect the spirit and the changes taking place in the Middle East.”


The confrontation and a later back-and-forth between Prince Turki and a confidant of Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu during the summit highlighted continued widespread opposition to Israel by many inside Saudi Arabia, despite some state-backed efforts to promote outreach with Jewish groups and supporters of Israel.

Ashkenazi, meanwhile, reiterated Israel’s position that it is the Palestinians who are to be blamed for not reaching a peace deal.

“We have a choice here with the Palestinians whether to solve it or not, or to go to this blame game,” said Ashkenazi, an ally of Netanyahu’s chief rival, Benny Gantz.

Dore Gold, a Netanyahu confidant and former UN ambassador in the audience, implied Prince Faisal’s remarks were “accusations of the past – many of which are false”.

The prince later brought up Gold’s previous television appearances “denigrating the kingdom and using the most vile descriptions”.

“I think Mr Dore Gold should be the last one to talk about having previous beliefs and positions here,” the prince said.

Prince Turki led Saudi intelligence for more than 20 years and served as ambassador to the United States and the United Kingdom.

Though he now holds no official position, his stance is seen as closely mirroring that of King Salman.

However, the king’s assertive son, the 35-year-old Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, is seen having a greater willingness to quietly engage with Israel to counter common rival Iran and boost foreign investment in the kingdom.

‘Not an easy ride’

Bahraini Foreign Minister Abdullatif al-Zayani, also on stage for the tense exchanges, sought to smooth over the differences in his remarks.

Still, he too stressed the importance of a resolution to the Palestinian-Israeli conflict based on a two-state solution as envisaged by the Arab Peace Initiative.

“The path of peace is not an easy ride. There will be a lot of obstacles along the way,” he said. “There will be ups and downs. But the bedrock of that path, the path of peace, is the Israeli-Palestinian issue.”

In an apparent reference to Iran, al-Zayani added a resolution to the conflict would also remove the pretext to justify some of the threats made to regional security.

Despite Prince Turki’s blunt rhetoric, mutual concern over Iran has gradually brought Israel and Gulf nations closer, and Riyadh itself has quietly been building relations with the Jewish state for several years.

Reports last month that Netanyahu had held secret talks in Saudi Arabia fuelled speculation that a normalisation accord with the Gulf’s top power could be in the making. Riyadh, however, denied the meeting occurred.

‘Need to see a settlement’

Saudi Foreign Minister Prince Faisal bin Farhan told the AFP news agency on Saturday the kingdom’s position remained resolute.

“We’ve been quite clear that in order for us to proceed with normalisation we will need to see a settlement of the Palestinian dispute and the formation of a viable state of Palestine along the lines envisioned in the 2002 Arab Peace Initiative,” he said in an interview in Manama.

Asked whether that effectively ruled out the establishment of ties with Israel any time soon, he said he was “optimistic that there is a path towards a resolution between the Palestinians and Israelis”.

Giving that Jews are forbidden from entering the kingdom, why Israel should even care about what this f***ing prince is saing?
 

Rafidi

Legendary Member
Giving that Jews are forbidden from entering the kingdom, why Israel should even care about what this f***ing prince is saing?

Someone sounds pissed.

Good one, Mr Saudi Prince. This is what we want to hear from the Kingdom.
 

NewLeb

Active Member
Giving that Jews are forbidden from entering the kingdom, why Israel should even care about what this f***ing prince is saing?

The Prince is an idiot.

Over the decades, Saudi Arabians haven’t done a thing for the Palestinians; always having neighboring countries like Lebanon carry the load.

All they’re capable of is giving these meaningless speeches that attempt to paint them as the righteous defenders in this feud, just like the useless Persians. When in reality, they’re both trash. ?
 

divergent

New Member
The Prince is an idiot.

Over the decades, Saudi Arabians haven’t done a thing for the Palestinians; always having neighboring countries like Lebanon carry the load.

All they’re capable of is giving these meaningless speeches that attempt to paint them as the righteous defenders in this feud, just like the useless Persians. When in reality, they’re both trash. ?
Saudi Arabia remains one of the top financial aid providers for the Palestinians since 2000, donating more than $6.5 bln in support over the past two decades, according to the Kingdom’s humanitarian groups
 

NewLeb

Active Member
Saudi Arabia remains one of the top financial aid providers for the Palestinians since 2000, donating more than $6.5 bln in support over the past two decades, according to the Kingdom’s humanitarian groups

So what? Throwing money at a problem doesn’t guarantee a solution. After $6.5 billion, we’re exactly where we first started (for the most part).

Those camel jockeys spent billions trying to bring down ASSad, and they still failed. Mr. Trump didn’t have to spend a single dollar on a bullet, and he brought them all to their knees: That’s real power.
 
Let’s be clear and this can piss off some of our friends ds on this forum. The region is going to peace and innovation. The younger generation is bravely using Technology and they realise that there are no borders like before.
It is the end of an era - I was in Dubai last week and very very very impressed by the numbers of Israelis - they are everywhere, buying everything and welcomed by the people of Dubai.

In parallel you have many Lebanese around and they started mixing at work, hotels, restaurants- go to The White club which is a Lebanese club. Israelis came in group to party and they ended up drinking with other Lebanese who were by the way Muslims (I heard one guy named Ali).

There is no return and coming back and all what we need is a just and fair agreement rather than stupid wars that are costing million times more than its benefits. They will talk about honor while they keep begging
 

Aegon

Well-Known Member
We need to relocate all Palestinians to KSA and Africa. They are never going back and never getting their land back. Israel And US should work for this as a goal then conditions will be ripe for peace.
 

proIsrael-nonIsraeli

Legendary Member
We need to relocate all Palestinians to KSA and Africa. They are never going back and never getting their land back. Israel And US should work for this as a goal then conditions will be ripe for peace.

Never say "never".

I have do not object to them having them land to call their own.

The way I see it WB and Gaza Arabs can be given contiguous piece of land consisting of part of Jordan+some parts of WB or Gaza+some part of Sinai (I prefer this).

The problem is not the land, the problem is that WB and Gaza Arabs do not want this kind of solution.
 
"Palestinian Authority stumped by Moroccan peace with Israel"
The Palestinian authority and Hamas both failed their people. They should have accepted from day one the split offered to them and kept bringing the whole region into chaos giving incentive to many terrorist parties to ride on the Palestinian cause.

Also let’s say something true : today all Palestinians I met in the Arab world tell me in confidence that they are happy living inside the Israeli occupied lands as they have jobs, decent salaries, hospitals and so on. For Christians it is a no brainier, they were starting to be kicked out by their Palestinian counterparts back in the 30’s. There are many exemples.

This doesn’t justify what Israel is doing for sure but with such a weak and useless Palestinian authority, Palestine was given to Israel on a golden plate.

What Palestinian should do is to ask the Arab world and especially the UAE and other countries to negotiate whatever deal on their behalf and help them later on to build a state. They failed by themselves and the result is that they lost 80% of their lands.

It requires an international intervention.
 

Sayyid Muki

Legendary Member
Orange Room Supporter
Never say "never".

I have do not object to them having them land to call their own.

The way I see it WB and Gaza Arabs can be given contiguous piece of land consisting of part of Jordan+some parts of WB or Gaza+some part of Sinai (I prefer this).

The problem is not the land, the problem is that WB and Gaza Arabs do not want this kind of solution.
Maybe they haven't heard of The Rolling Stones.
 

proIsrael-nonIsraeli

Legendary Member
The Palestinian authority and Hamas both failed their people. They should have accepted from day one the split offered to them and kept bringing the whole region into chaos giving incentive to many terrorist parties to ride on the Palestinian cause.

Also let’s say something true : today all Palestinians I met in the Arab world tell me in confidence that they are happy living inside the Israeli occupied lands as they have jobs, decent salaries, hospitals and so on. For Christians it is a no brainier, they were starting to be kicked out by their Palestinian counterparts back in the 30’s. There are many exemples.

This doesn’t justify what Israel is doing for sure but with such a weak and useless Palestinian authority, Palestine was given to Israel on a golden plate.

What Palestinian should do is to ask the Arab world and especially the UAE and other countries to negotiate whatever deal on their behalf and help them later on to build a state. They failed by themselves and the result is that they lost 80% of their lands.

It requires an international intervention.

"This doesn’t justify what Israel is doing" - and what exactly Israel is doing.
 

agnostic

Legendary Member
@agnostic, yet another good news. Rejoice.

"Israel, Bhutan establish formal relations"

إِنَّ النَّاسَ عَبِيدُ الدُّنْيَا، وَالدِّينُ لَعْقٌ عَلَى أَلْسِنَتِهِمْ‏ يَحُوطُونَهُ مَا دَرَّتْ مَعَايِشُهُمْ فَإِذَا مُحِّصُوا بِالْبَلَاءِ قَلَّ الدَّيَّانُونَ

People are slave of being worldly. Virtue is only a lick on their tongue they immure as their livings turn. So when examined with test and affliction, the virtuous become rare. Imam Husain in Karbala.
 

proIsrael-nonIsraeli

Legendary Member
إِنَّ النَّاسَ عَبِيدُ الدُّنْيَا، وَالدِّينُ لَعْقٌ عَلَى أَلْسِنَتِهِمْ‏ يَحُوطُونَهُ مَا دَرَّتْ مَعَايِشُهُمْ فَإِذَا مُحِّصُوا بِالْبَلَاءِ قَلَّ الدَّيَّانُونَ

People are slave of being worldly. Virtue is only a lick on their tongue they immure as their livings turn. So when examined with test and affliction, the virtuous become rare. Imam Husain in Karbala.

So?
 

agnostic

Legendary Member
It is natural that people seeking worldly life are morally weak. And in current times of Jewildoer's domination, such people are never fed up of licking Jews asses while in WWII these same people would have been denouncing the Jews. And to not be part of these people, one has to always take the side of God. That's precisely the aim of the Party Of God, in arabic Hezbollah...
 
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