Unique Animals

Paradosiaka

Paradosiaka

Active Member
40-Emperor Tamarin: The Emperor Tamarin (Saguinus imperator) is a tamarin allegedly named for its similarity with the German emperor Wilhelm II. The name was first intended as a joke, but has become the official scientific name.
This tamarin lives in the southwest Amazon Basin, in east Peru, north Bolivia and in the west Brazilian states of Acre and Amazonas. The fur of the Emperor Tamarin is predominantly grey colored, with yellowish speckles on its chest. The hands and feet are black and the tail is brown. Outstanding is its long, white mustache, which extends to both sides beyond the shoulders. The animal reaches a length of 24 to 26 cm, plus a 35 cm long tail. It weighs approximately 300 to 400 g. This primate inhabits tropical rain forests, living deep in the forest and also in open tree-covered areas. It is a diurnal animal, spending the majority of its days in the trees with quick, safe movements and broad jumps among the limbs.




 
  • Advertisement
  • EuroMode

    EuroMode

    Active Member
    41. Cuban Greater Funnel-Eared Bat: There are fewer than 100 Cuban greater funnel-eared bats left in Cueva La Barca, Cuba. The bats have lost much of their habitat due to human destruction.

     
    EuroMode

    EuroMode

    Active Member
    42. Northern Bald Ibis: There are fewer than 250 mature Northern bald ibises. The northern bald ibis breeds in Morocco, Turkey, and Syria. The ibis is threatened by habitat degradation and destruction, and hunting.



     
    Paradosiaka

    Paradosiaka

    Active Member
    43-Axolotl: The Axolotl (or ajolote) (Ambystoma mexicanum) is the best-known of the Mexican neotenic mole salamanders belonging to the Tiger Salamander complex. Larvae of this species fail to undergo metamorphosis, so the adults remain aquatic and gilled. The species originates from the lake underlying Mexico City. Axolotls are used extensively in scientific research due to their ability to regenerate most body parts, ease of breeding, and large embryos. They are commonly kept as pets in the United States, Great Britain, Australia, Japan (where they are sold under the name Wooper Rooper, and other countries.

    Axolotls should not be confused with waterdogs, the larval stage of the closely related Tiger Salamanders (Ambystoma tigrinum and Ambystoma mavortium), which is widespread in much of North America which also occasionally become neotenic, nor with mudpuppies (Necturus spp.), fully aquatic salamanders which are unrelated to the axolotl but which bear a superficial resemblance.



     
    EuroMode

    EuroMode

    Active Member
    44. Roloway monkey: The roloway monkey used to live in the forests of Ghana and Côte d’Ivoire, but it has become extinct in Ghana. Hunting for consumption as bushmeat and habitat loss have contributed to the drastic decline in the creature’s population.



     
    EuroMode

    EuroMode

    Active Member
    45. Araripe Manakin: There are 779 Araripe Manakins that live in Brazil. They have suffered from habitat destruction due to expansion of agriculture and recreational facilities.

     
    EuroMode

    EuroMode

    Active Member
    46. Mnemiopsis leidyi: This undated image provided by the Sars International Center for Marine Molecular Biology, University of Bergen, Norway via the journal Science in December 2013 shows a Mnemiopsis leidyi, a species of comb jelly known as a sea walnut. A new study published online Thursday, December 12, 2013 in the journal Science says comb jellies, a group of gelatinous marine animals, represent the oldest branch of the animal family tree.

     
    EuroMode

    EuroMode

    Active Member
    47. Rio Pescado Stubfoot Toad: Unseen since 1995, the toad, which lives in the lowlands of Ecuador, was rediscovered in 2010.

     
    EuroMode

    EuroMode

    Active Member
    48. Geometric Tortoise: The geometric tortoise lives in Cape Province, South Africa. It is threatened by habitat destruction and degradation as well as predation.

     
    Paradosiaka

    Paradosiaka

    Active Member
    49-Shoebill: The Shoebill, Balaeniceps rex also known as Whalehead is a very large bird related to the storks. It derives its name from its massive shoe-shaped bill.
    The Shoebill is a very large bird, averaging 1.2 m (4 ft) tall, 5.6 kg (12.3 lbs) and 2.33 m (7.7 ft) across the wings. The adult is mainly grey, the juveniles are browner. It lives in tropical east Africa, in large swamps from Sudan to Zambia.
    The Shoebill was added rather recently to the ornithological lists; the species was only discovered in the 19th century when some skins were brought to Europe. It was not until years later that live specimens reached the scientific community. The bird was known to both ancient Egyptians and Arabs however. There exist Egyptian images depicting the Shoebill while the Arabs referred to the bird as abu markub, which means one with a shoe. Clearly, this refers to the striking bill.


     
    EuroMode

    EuroMode

    Active Member
    50. Jamaican Rock Iguana: Believed to be extinct for many years, this iguana was found in the remote Hellshire Hills in 1970.

     
    EuroMode

    EuroMode

    Active Member
    51. Spoon-Billed Sandpiper: The spoon-billed sandpiper is a small wader that breeds in northeastern Russia. There are fewer than 1,000 mature individuals left in the wild. The main threats to its survival are habitat loss on its breeding grounds and loss of tidal flats through its migratory and wintering range.



     
    EuroMode

    EuroMode

    Active Member
    52. Luristan Newt (aka Kaiser’s Spotted Newt): The luristan newt is a type of salamander and is endemic to the southern Zagros Mountains in Iran. The luristan newt is coveted in the pet trade — they were sold on a Ukraine website for $300 — and now only survives in captivity.

     
    EuroMode

    EuroMode

    Active Member
    53. Vaquita: This is the world’s smallest dolphin, and is from the Northern Gulf of California and Mexico. There are fewer than 200 vaquita dolphins left in the wild, and the population is declining. The immediate threat to the dolphins is the use of gillnets deployed by fishermen.



     
    EuroMode

    EuroMode

    Active Member
    54. Actinote Zikani: The Actinote zikani lives in Sao Paulo, Brazil, but has lost much of its habitat to humans.

     
    EuroMode

    EuroMode

    Active Member
    55. Greater Bamboo Lemur: There are only 100–160 individuals left in the southeastern and southcentral rainforests of Madagascar. The major threat to this animal is slash-and-burn agriculture, mining, and illegal logging. This creature has powerful jaws that can crack through bamboo, which makes up the majority of its diet.



     
    Paradosiaka

    Paradosiaka

    Active Member
    56-Blue Mountains Tree Frog: Blue Mountains TREE FROG is 4.4 to 6.3 centermeters long, medium to light brown above with dark flecks, and white underneath (belly)
    Distinctive marks includes
    1) a dark stripe + a thinner lighter stripe along the frogs side,
    2) Bright green patches found on head as well as arms and leg
    3) Bright red & orange marks around arms and legs

    Found from the coast of New South Wales and eastern Victoria to the Blue Mountains & The Great Dividing Range. They are usually found in or around rocks in small permanent or semi permanent creeks and small waterways in temperate forested or woodland areas.


     
    EuroMode

    EuroMode

    Active Member
    57. Tarzan’s chameleon: This chameleon was discovered in 2009 in the Tarzan Forest in Madagascar. Rampant deforestation threatens Tarzan’s chameleon.

     
    EuroMode

    EuroMode

    Active Member
    58. Saola: This magical creature was only discovered in 1992. It lives in the Annamite mountains on the Vietnam and Laos border.

     
    EuroMode

    EuroMode

    Active Member
    59. Red River Giant Softshell Turtle: This enormous weighs 440 pounds. Unfortunately, there are only four red river giant softshell turtles left, all of which live in captivity. The animal is considered sacred by many Vietnamese.

     
    Top