Unrest in Afghanistan - Updates and Discussions [Breaking: Kabul has fallen - Taliban rule Afghanistan]

Viral

Well-Known Member

The resurgence of the Taliban in Afghanistan is simply America’s chickens coming home to roost

1627534449963.png

Glenn Sacks teaches social studies and represents United Teachers Los Angeles at James Monroe High School in the Los Angeles Unified School District. His columns on education and politics have been published in dozens of America’s best-known publications.


After overrunning government troops and seizing dozens of districts, the Taliban claims to control 85% of Afghanistan. This claim reflects US intelligence’s conclusion that the Afghan government could collapse within six months.
The Taliban and the Afghan government are negotiating a power-sharing agreement, but making little progress. In negotiations, the government has pushed Taliban leader Mawlawi Hibatullah Akhundzada for a promise on the treatment of women, but he has been willing to concede very little.
The government supporters’ biggest fear is the fate of Afghan women, should the Taliban again take control. This is entirely appropriate, and ironic, because women’s rights were what set off this long era of war and strife in Afghanistan 43 years ago.
In April 1978, the left-wing, reformist People’s Democratic Party of Afghanistan (PDPA) seized power in the Saur Revolution. More aptly described as a coup, the PDPA’s support primarily came from a thin layer of educated Afghans in major cities along with Afghan military officers.
Before the PDPA took power, in much of the country, women were forced to wear the stifling head-to-toe veil, and were not able to go to school, own property, or divorce. They were often considered non-persons in the eyes of the law, and the female literacy rate was just 1%.
The PDPA quickly took measures to begin to modernize Afghanistan, giving women the right to divorce and own property, reducing the bride price to a nominal fee, and, perhaps most controversial of all, promoting education for girls. It also distributed land to the impoverished peasants and restrained the power of the Muslim clergy.
ALSO ON RT.COMMore than a thousand Russian & Uzbek troops sent to border with Afghanistan as Taliban gains ground following American withdrawal
In response, the mullahs told the peasants that Allah would hang them upside down in the sky for all eternity if they allowed women to be unveiled and girls to go to school, and accepted the government’s land grants. Soon, rural Afghanistan had exploded in a rebellion that threatened to topple the PDPA – perhaps the only war in history to have started largely over women’s rights.
While unpopular in the countryside, the regime, backed by the Soviet Union, had many supporters in Afghanistan’s cities. Urban Afghans had seen that, in the adjoining Muslim regions of the USSR – regions as backward as Afghanistan until the Soviet era – tremendous progress had been made in eliminating illiteracy, reducing infant mortality, and improving living standards.
Women had come to make up half or more of the doctors, engineers, and teachers in Soviet Central Asia. Many urban Afghans saw the USSR, for all its flaws, as a model of progress for their country to follow.
The US government, led by National Security Advisor Zbigniew Brzezinski, a Cold War hawk, saw in Afghanistan an opportunity to weaken the Soviet Union, and set the so-called “Bear Trap.”
In Operation Cyclone, the US Central Intelligence Agency covertly armed Muslim fundamentalist extremists to fight the PDPA, believing that the Soviets, faced with the possibility of a Muslim extremist regime on their southern border, would intervene militarily. Cyclone would become one of the largest CIA operations ever, dispensing $3 billion to the various anti-PDPA groups known collectively as the Mujahideen.
Many of America’s later enemies came out of the Mujahideen the US was instrumental in building. They included the following: Osama bin Laden, who fought against the Soviets and helped funnel arms, money, and fighters from the Arab world into Afghanistan, forming Al-Qaeda in 1988; Mullah Omar, who lost an eye in a grenade attack while fighting the Soviets, and later became the leader of the Taliban; Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, who joined and fought with the Mujahideen, and masterminded 9/11; and Abu Musab al-Zarqawi, who joined the Mujahideen near the end of the Soviet-Afghan War and was later dubbed the Butcher of Fallujah by the US for his atrocities during the US occupation of Iraq.
ALSO ON RT.COMAs US troops are flown out of Afghanistan, the graveyard of great empires is now once again at the center of a battle for Eurasia
The PDPA, struggling to survive, repressed opposition, often brutally, and repeatedly asked the USSR to intervene. The Soviets kept rebuffing them, and instead, told them to slow the pace of modernization and reform and pacify the rural areas.
As the PDPA’s situation continued to deteriorate, in late 1979, the USSR intervened, sending 80,000 troops into Afghanistan to prop up the PDPA. The Soviets had been pulled into the Bear Trap, exactly as Brzezinski intended. The US wildly overreacted to this “invasion,” portraying the Soviet action – which sought no more than to prop up a regime whose mistakes brought chaos and extremism to its border – as some sort of global Soviet expansion.
The US instituted draft registration, which continues to this day, sharply increased military spending, decreed a US boycott of the 1980 Olympics in Moscow, and dubbed the Mujahideen “freedom fighters,” showering them with aid.
After Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev – who had called the war a “bleeding wound,” largely because the USSR’s economy was deteriorating sharply – pulled Soviet troops out in early 1989, it was widely predicted in the Western press that, without the USSR’s support, the Afghan regime would quickly collapse. It didn’t happen. In key battles such as the bloody siege of Jalalabad, Afghan Army men, alongside women in volunteer militias, dealt the Mujahideen a humiliating defeat.
After the fall of communism in 1991, Soviet aid – most importantly, replacement parts, fuel, and weapons – was cut off. The PDPA held out until 1992, when the Mujahideen finally seized Kabul. Some Mujahideen, along with Afghan refugees from Pakistan, came together to form the Taliban, who took over most of the country in 1996.
One video clip, filmed shortly after the Taliban takeover, symbolizes Taliban rule: a trembling woman covered in a head-to-toe veil, her face completely obscured, sobs as she speaks with a Western reporter. Who is she? An impoverished peasant? A homeless woman? No, she’s the recently removed chief surgeon at the country’s largest hospital.
The US, combining ignorance and staggering hypocrisy, has spent the past 25 years moralizing over Taliban/Muslim fundamentalist “gender apartheid” and abuse of women – an abuse that would have disappeared from Afghanistan decades ago were it not for the US’ determined intervention.
ALSO ON RT.COMSanctions against Taliban could be lifted as part of Afghan peace process, top Russian diplomat tells RT in wake of US withdrawal
According to feminist scholar and author Valentine Moghadam, “Human rights reports have had to concede that women had higher status and more opportunities under the reformist, left-wing government.” She explains that, in 1985, women accounted for 65% of the 7,000 students at Kabul University – unthinkable in previous times. And, according to the Los Angeles Times, “Women in Afghan cities probably enjoyed their greatest freedom during the Soviet-backed regime that ruled in Kabul from 1979 to 1992.”
In Afghanistan, PDPA leader Mohammad Najibullah, once reviled as a Soviet puppet, has come to be seen positively. Over the past decade, posters and photographs of him have become a common sight in Afghan cities.

The Soviet-Afghan War was a brutal conflict with atrocities on all sides, but the Soviet-backed regime, for all its faults, was the best opportunity Afghans ever had to form a modern, comparatively humane society.

Since the 9-11 attacks the US has fought to rid itself of the attack dog it helped build and set loose on the USSR. Now, as the US struggles to extricate itself from two decades of war in Afghanistan, it again finds its chickens have come home to roost.
 

proIsrael-nonIsraeli

Legendary Member

The resurgence of the Taliban in Afghanistan is simply America’s chickens coming home to roost

View attachment 24418

Glenn Sacks teaches social studies and represents United Teachers Los Angeles at James Monroe High School in the Los Angeles Unified School District. His columns on education and politics have been published in dozens of America’s best-known publications.


After overrunning government troops and seizing dozens of districts, the Taliban claims to control 85% of Afghanistan. This claim reflects US intelligence’s conclusion that the Afghan government could collapse within six months.
The Taliban and the Afghan government are negotiating a power-sharing agreement, but making little progress. In negotiations, the government has pushed Taliban leader Mawlawi Hibatullah Akhundzada for a promise on the treatment of women, but he has been willing to concede very little.
The government supporters’ biggest fear is the fate of Afghan women, should the Taliban again take control. This is entirely appropriate, and ironic, because women’s rights were what set off this long era of war and strife in Afghanistan 43 years ago.
In April 1978, the left-wing, reformist People’s Democratic Party of Afghanistan (PDPA) seized power in the Saur Revolution. More aptly described as a coup, the PDPA’s support primarily came from a thin layer of educated Afghans in major cities along with Afghan military officers.
Before the PDPA took power, in much of the country, women were forced to wear the stifling head-to-toe veil, and were not able to go to school, own property, or divorce. They were often considered non-persons in the eyes of the law, and the female literacy rate was just 1%.
The PDPA quickly took measures to begin to modernize Afghanistan, giving women the right to divorce and own property, reducing the bride price to a nominal fee, and, perhaps most controversial of all, promoting education for girls. It also distributed land to the impoverished peasants and restrained the power of the Muslim clergy.
ALSO ON RT.COMMore than a thousand Russian & Uzbek troops sent to border with Afghanistan as Taliban gains ground following American withdrawal
In response, the mullahs told the peasants that Allah would hang them upside down in the sky for all eternity if they allowed women to be unveiled and girls to go to school, and accepted the government’s land grants. Soon, rural Afghanistan had exploded in a rebellion that threatened to topple the PDPA – perhaps the only war in history to have started largely over women’s rights.
While unpopular in the countryside, the regime, backed by the Soviet Union, had many supporters in Afghanistan’s cities. Urban Afghans had seen that, in the adjoining Muslim regions of the USSR – regions as backward as Afghanistan until the Soviet era – tremendous progress had been made in eliminating illiteracy, reducing infant mortality, and improving living standards.
Women had come to make up half or more of the doctors, engineers, and teachers in Soviet Central Asia. Many urban Afghans saw the USSR, for all its flaws, as a model of progress for their country to follow.
The US government, led by National Security Advisor Zbigniew Brzezinski, a Cold War hawk, saw in Afghanistan an opportunity to weaken the Soviet Union, and set the so-called “Bear Trap.”
In Operation Cyclone, the US Central Intelligence Agency covertly armed Muslim fundamentalist extremists to fight the PDPA, believing that the Soviets, faced with the possibility of a Muslim extremist regime on their southern border, would intervene militarily. Cyclone would become one of the largest CIA operations ever, dispensing $3 billion to the various anti-PDPA groups known collectively as the Mujahideen.
Many of America’s later enemies came out of the Mujahideen the US was instrumental in building. They included the following: Osama bin Laden, who fought against the Soviets and helped funnel arms, money, and fighters from the Arab world into Afghanistan, forming Al-Qaeda in 1988; Mullah Omar, who lost an eye in a grenade attack while fighting the Soviets, and later became the leader of the Taliban; Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, who joined and fought with the Mujahideen, and masterminded 9/11; and Abu Musab al-Zarqawi, who joined the Mujahideen near the end of the Soviet-Afghan War and was later dubbed the Butcher of Fallujah by the US for his atrocities during the US occupation of Iraq.
ALSO ON RT.COMAs US troops are flown out of Afghanistan, the graveyard of great empires is now once again at the center of a battle for Eurasia
The PDPA, struggling to survive, repressed opposition, often brutally, and repeatedly asked the USSR to intervene. The Soviets kept rebuffing them, and instead, told them to slow the pace of modernization and reform and pacify the rural areas.
As the PDPA’s situation continued to deteriorate, in late 1979, the USSR intervened, sending 80,000 troops into Afghanistan to prop up the PDPA. The Soviets had been pulled into the Bear Trap, exactly as Brzezinski intended. The US wildly overreacted to this “invasion,” portraying the Soviet action – which sought no more than to prop up a regime whose mistakes brought chaos and extremism to its border – as some sort of global Soviet expansion.
The US instituted draft registration, which continues to this day, sharply increased military spending, decreed a US boycott of the 1980 Olympics in Moscow, and dubbed the Mujahideen “freedom fighters,” showering them with aid.
After Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev – who had called the war a “bleeding wound,” largely because the USSR’s economy was deteriorating sharply – pulled Soviet troops out in early 1989, it was widely predicted in the Western press that, without the USSR’s support, the Afghan regime would quickly collapse. It didn’t happen. In key battles such as the bloody siege of Jalalabad, Afghan Army men, alongside women in volunteer militias, dealt the Mujahideen a humiliating defeat.
After the fall of communism in 1991, Soviet aid – most importantly, replacement parts, fuel, and weapons – was cut off. The PDPA held out until 1992, when the Mujahideen finally seized Kabul. Some Mujahideen, along with Afghan refugees from Pakistan, came together to form the Taliban, who took over most of the country in 1996.
One video clip, filmed shortly after the Taliban takeover, symbolizes Taliban rule: a trembling woman covered in a head-to-toe veil, her face completely obscured, sobs as she speaks with a Western reporter. Who is she? An impoverished peasant? A homeless woman? No, she’s the recently removed chief surgeon at the country’s largest hospital.
The US, combining ignorance and staggering hypocrisy, has spent the past 25 years moralizing over Taliban/Muslim fundamentalist “gender apartheid” and abuse of women – an abuse that would have disappeared from Afghanistan decades ago were it not for the US’ determined intervention.
ALSO ON RT.COMSanctions against Taliban could be lifted as part of Afghan peace process, top Russian diplomat tells RT in wake of US withdrawal
According to feminist scholar and author Valentine Moghadam, “Human rights reports have had to concede that women had higher status and more opportunities under the reformist, left-wing government.” She explains that, in 1985, women accounted for 65% of the 7,000 students at Kabul University – unthinkable in previous times. And, according to the Los Angeles Times, “Women in Afghan cities probably enjoyed their greatest freedom during the Soviet-backed regime that ruled in Kabul from 1979 to 1992.”
In Afghanistan, PDPA leader Mohammad Najibullah, once reviled as a Soviet puppet, has come to be seen positively. Over the past decade, posters and photographs of him have become a common sight in Afghan cities.

The Soviet-Afghan War was a brutal conflict with atrocities on all sides, but the Soviet-backed regime, for all its faults, was the best opportunity Afghans ever had to form a modern, comparatively humane society.

Since the 9-11 attacks the US has fought to rid itself of the attack dog it helped build and set loose on the USSR. Now, as the US struggles to extricate itself from two decades of war in Afghanistan, it again finds its chickens have come home to roost.

"The resurgence of the Taliban in Afghanistan is simply America’s chickens coming home to roost"

Whose home? They are not here, in USA, or even if they are they are toothless.
 

Viral

Well-Known Member

Several rockets hit Afghanistan’s Kandahar airport amid ongoing Taliban assault


1627796649817.png

The international airport in Kandahar has come under rocket attack, forcing the cancelation of all flights. Fighting has intensified on the outskirts of the city, the Taliban seeking to recapture its former stronghold.
At least three rockets were launched towards Ahmad Shah Baba International Airport on Sunday, with two of the projectiles hitting the runaway, airport chief Massoud Pashtun said, as cited by the news agency AFP.
The reported strike resulted in damage to the runaway, bringing the airport’s operations to a halt. Both outbound and inbound flights were canceled, but are expected to resume later in the day, the official said.
ALSO ON RT.COMMore than 200 Afghans land in Washington as US starts evacuating its allies after drawdown – media
The attack comes as the Taliban has ramped up its offensive on the capital of the southern Kandahar province, considered the birthplace of the Islamist movement. The group has been going through a resurgence, having gained swaths of territory after US troops left Bagram Air Base, its main airfield in the country, in early July.
Apart from being Afghanistan’s second main international airport, Kandahar’s also serves as one of the largest air bases, being used by the Afghan security forces, and previously by those of both NATO and the US. American troops left Kandahar Airfield three months ago as part of the current drawdown, which is set to end with a complete withdrawal by the September 11 deadline.
 

Qandahar

Legendary Member

35nx1dg68uWt94EmczvUAq0PeU6cCRtTtYUDB7NTgUfigDYIY9eaZJlOWnQkYBaIngRYmkkhVH5Ajbt8ztqcCnIjNgxoYbCWn72ojbxrVeaX5X60vtm8C3PE72UlS2iBb3B21VSW
 

proIsrael-nonIsraeli

Legendary Member

35nx1dg68uWt94EmczvUAq0PeU6cCRtTtYUDB7NTgUfigDYIY9eaZJlOWnQkYBaIngRYmkkhVH5Ajbt8ztqcCnIjNgxoYbCWn72ojbxrVeaX5X60vtm8C3PE72UlS2iBb3B21VSW

Looks like Taliban controls a lot of territory.
Does anyone know how it looks if relative to population.
 

Viral

Well-Known Member
History keeps repeating itself but very few notice or learn...


Live Updates: Taliban Seize 3 Afghan Capital Cities in a Day

The fall of Kunduz, a major northern hub, fuels the insurgents’ pushes in two nearby capitals, Sar-i-Pul and Taliqan, in a devastating blow to the Afghan government just weeks before the final withdrawal of U.S. troops.
RIGHT NOW
The Taliban fly their flag in Kunduz as exhausted Afghan troops regroup.

Here’s what you need to know:​



Another provincial capital, Taliqan, falls to the insurgents on Sunday.



merlin_190425447_e29e12a8-ffe3-4133-9e35-5c94d9b99fcd-articleLarge.jpg


Afghan militia forces at an outpost last month in the Tange Farkhar area of Taliqan, the capital of Takhar Province.Credit...Naseer Sadeq/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images
Taliban fighters captured another northern provincial capital on Sunday afternoon, local officials said, marking the third city to fall to the insurgent group in a single day.
The fighters had been contained at the gates of Taliqan, the capital of Takhar Province, since June. But as the Kunduz city center fell to the Taliban on Sunday, the insurgents moved into Taliqan, just a few miles away, pushing back government forces there in a bout of vicious fighting.
By sunset, the Taliban had seized the police headquarters and the provincial governor’s office, said an Afghan official who spoke on the condition of anonymity to discuss the developing situation.
Keramatullah Rustaqi, a Takhar provincial council member, said that the city had fallen to the Taliban and that “security forces left Taliqan to retreat to Farkhar,” a neighboring district.
Mr. Rustaqi added that government forces were ambushed along the way.
Taliqan, an ethnically diverse city with Uzbek, Tajik, Pashtun and Hazara residents, is symbolic to many in the north, and like Kunduz, which is just a few miles away, it borders Tajikistan. The city was the operations center of Ahmad Shah Massoud, an anti-Taliban militia commander who was killed just before the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks in 2001.
“A large number of the Taliban came from Kunduz and the districts of Takhar to capture Taliqan city, and there is fighting in four directions,” said Karimullah Bek, a pro-government militia commander in Taliqan, a few hours before the city fell. “We need reinforcements.”
The exhaustion described by government militia members fighting in Taliqan is common among security forces across Afghanistan after months of trying to hold back the Taliban. In addition to Kunduz, the insurgents have in just three days seized three other provincial capitals: Sheberghan, the capital of Jowzjan Province; Zaranj, the capital of Nimruz Province on the Afghanistan-Iran border; and Sar-e-Pul, the capital of a northern province of the same name.
“The situation is chaotic, and the front lines are not clear now,” said Mohammed Omar, a district governor in Takhar who is leading militia fighters in Taliqan.
By Sunday afternoon the Taliban had freed hundreds of inmates from the prison in Taliqan after security forces there fled, said Wafiullah Rahmani, the head of the Takhar provincial council. Breaking into jails and prisons has long been a central part of the insurgent group’s military strategy.
The Taliban’s capture of Taliqan, is a significant blow to the militia forces that are once again rising to prominence in an echo of the 1990s, when an ethnically charged civil war tore Afghanistan apart and helped the Taliban come to power.
Mr. Massoud’s son is now trying to assemble a force much in the way that his father did after the Soviets invaded Afghanistan more than 40 years ago. But the rise of these militia forces has had uneven effects on the battlefield.
The Taliban’s recent gains have put them in a position to consolidate their fighters and strengthen an offensive on Mazar-i-Sharif, an important economic hub near the Uzbek border and the capital of Balkh Province.
And once more the Afghan government has been presented with a dilemma: battle to retake the cities they have lost, or focus on defending what cities and provinces remain.
Thomas Gibbons-Neff, Najim Rahim and Sharif Hassan

The Taliban fly their flag in Kunduz as exhausted Afghan troops regroup.

Video

0:32The Taliban Seize Key City in Northern Afghanistan
Kunduz became the first major city to be overtaken by the Taliban since their military offensive began in May. The seizure was a major blow to the Afghan government and was the third provincial capital to be overtaken by the insurgents in three days.CreditCredit...Abdullah Sahil/Associated Press
KABUL, Afghanistan — The Taliban seized a major strategic and propaganda prize early Sunday, capturing the crucial northern commercial hub of Kunduz and then breaking through in two other regional capitals later the same day.
The rapid fall of Afghan cities on Sunday — including Kunduz, Sar-i-Pul and Taliqan, all northern capitals — comes just weeks before U.S. forces were set to complete a total withdrawal from Afghanistan. It is a crucial challenge for President Biden, who in recent weeks has insisted the American pullout would continue despite the Taliban’s advances.
After sweeping through the country’s rural areas, the insurgents’ military campaign has shifted to brutal urban combat in recent weeks. They have pushed into the edges of major cities like Kandahar and Lashkar Gah in the south and Herat in the west.
The strategy has exhausted the Afghan government’s forces and overwhelmed the local militia forces that the government has used to supplement its own troops, a move reminiscent of the chaotic and ethnically divided civil war of the 1990s.
Kunduz, the capital of a province of the same name, is a significant military and political prize. With a population of 374,000, it is a vital commercial city near the border with Tajikistan, and a hub for trade and road traffic.
“All security forces fled to the airport, and the situation is critical,” said Sayed Jawad Hussaini, the deputy police chief of a district in Kunduz city.
Clashes between government forces and Taliban fighters were continuing in a small town south of the city, where the local army headquarters and the airport are situated, security officials said.
“We are so tired, and the security forces are so tired,” Mr. Hussaini said. “At the same time we hadn’t received reinforcements and aircraft did not target the Taliban on time.”
Security forces, who had retreated to the town earlier in the morning, began an operation to flush Taliban fighters out of the city on Sunday evening, according to security officials.
In the two preceding days, the Taliban had taken two other provincial capitals: Sheberghan, the capital of Jowzjan Province in the north, and Zaranj, the capital of Nimruz Province on the Afghanistan-Iran border.
The Taliban briefly seized Kunduz in 2015 and again in 2016, gaining control of a province for the first time since American forces invaded in 2001. Both times, Afghan forces pushed back the insurgents with help from American airstrikes. Kunduz is also where an American gunship mistakenly attacked a Doctors Without Borders hospital in 2015, killing 42 people.
Since the U.S. withdrawal began, the Taliban have captured more than half of Afghanistan’s 400-odd districts, according to some assessments. Their attacks on provincial capitals have violated the 2020 peace deal between the Taliban and the United States. Under that deal, which precipitated the American withdrawal from the country, the Taliban committed to not attacking provincial centers like Kunduz.
 

Viral

Well-Known Member
History keeps repeating itself but very few notice or learn...


‘Save our lives, UK’: Abandoned Afghan interpreters plead with London as Taliban offensive rolls on

8 Aug, 2021 21:37

1628459680440.png

The UK has extracted some 3,000 people it employed in Afghanistan, but the relocation program has come under fire as the situation deteriorates. Hundreds are set to have been left behind at the mercy of Islamist militants.
Two Afghan interpreters, who served British troops during their years-long stay in the war-torn country, talked to Sky News, expressing fear for their own lives and the safety of their families.
Both men are former so-called Locally Employed Staff (LES), eligible for Britain’s Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy (ARAP). As interpreters, in theory, they fall under the “exposed meaningful enabling role” category that has been prioritized for evacuation.
ALSO ON RT.COMRemain in Afghanistan without the Americans? Britain would be hard pressed defending Alderney with our depleted armed forces
In reality, however, both men have been left behind since they were dismissed from the British service for unspecified offences – serious enough to be disqualified from ARAP – but both maintain their innocence.
“In the coming months the Taliban will get me,” N., the father of three children, told the broadcaster via mobile phone. He also shared a photo with his children holding placards reading “Help us UK gov” and “Save our live UK”.

As soon as possible, they will find me, they will slay me. They will slaughter and behead me and my family.
Another former interpreter, W., shared the same sentiment. He communicated with Sky News via email due to a very poor phone signal and the channel’s inability to send reporters to the area for security reasons. In recent days, several provincial capitals fell into the hands of the Taliban, including the country’s fifth-largest city, Kunduz.

“Please kindly bring changes in your policy. Do not leave anyone behind who worked for the British forces,” W. pleaded.

I am absolutely fearful about my life because I already lost my family member. Taliban are stronger than every other time… We feel heartbroken.
The UK government, however, insists it is doing everything possible for the Afghans who worked for it. British Minister for Immigration Compliance and Justice Chris Philip firmly rejected accusations that “bureaucrats in government” are disregarding human lives.
ALSO ON RT.COMRetired Aussie army officer BURNS service medal in protest over govt abandoning Afghan interpreters facing ‘slaughter’ by Taliban
“As a nation, we are known around the world for our commitment to justice, fairness and sense of duty, especially to those who have stood with us against despicable forces who seek to divide and destabilize,” Philip said in an opinion piece published by The Guardian on Sunday.
The UK has brought in more than 2,800 Afghans under the ARAP programme, including “1,400 arriving over the last few weeks alone.” The government also “made numerous changes in recent weeks to accommodate more brave individuals, opening our schemes up to those who resigned, those who were dismissed for all but serious or criminal offences,” Philip said.
Still, there was no positive news from the minister for N. and W., as they apparently fall under the latter category, which includes at least 415 former LES, according to official figures.
The changes touted by the minister weren’t exactly the sole product of the benevolence of bureaucrats, as a lack of progress in extracting LES has repeatedly come in for criticism from different sides.
ALSO ON RT.COM‘Lives in danger’: Dozens of Afghan ex-workers block Bundeswehr base, demand asylum in Germany
The latest jab at the ARAP program came late in July, when dozens of ex-military chiefs sent an open letter to Prime Minister Boris Johnson, stating they were “gravely concerned” about hundreds of Afghan interpreters who had their ARAP applications rejected.
“Too many of our former interpreters have unnecessarily and unreasonably been rejected… We strongly urge that the policy is reviewed again immediately, to ensure more are given sanctuary,” the letter read.
 

Viral

Well-Known Member
History keeps repeating itself but very few notice or learn...


Taliban overruns most of Kunduz as Afghan military clings to strategic city’s airport – reports​


1628459821911.png

Taliban militants have captured another provincial capital, Sar-e Pul, and most of the fifth-largest city of Kunduz, according to local officials. Afghan special forces have been deployed in a bid to re-take the latter.
The militants seized all the key government buildings in the two cities overnight, pushing the government troops to military installations on their outskirts. The troops are currently clinging onto the airport in Kunduz, in the north of the country.
ALSO ON RT.COMWATCH: Taliban fighters ride in Humvees after capturing Nimroz provincial capital & seizing more US-made weaponry
“Heavy clashes started yesterday afternoon. All government headquarters are in the control of the Taliban. Only the army base and the airport is with ANDSF [Afghan security forces] from where they are resisting the Taliban,” provincial lawmaker Amruddin Wali told Reuters.
Footage circulating online shows the militants roaming the city streets en masse, with the group’s flags hoisted on multiple military vehicles.

Kunduz’s market was destroyed in the fighting, with disturbing footage purporting to show the whole location on fire. It was not immediately clear how exactly the market was obliterated, with some reports suggesting it was targeted by American warplanes supporting the Afghan troops. On Saturday, the US military launched airstrikes against the Taliban in a bid to halt its offensive, sending in B-52 Stratofortress strategic bombers and AC-130 Spectre gunships.

Although the Taliban claimed it was in full control of Kunduz, the government said it had re-deployed special forces units to the city and was trying to push back the militants. A short video released by Afghan military spokesperson Fawad Aman shows special forces troops advancing through the streets, firing at unseen adversaries.

The situation in the northwestern city of Sar-e Pul appears to be similar to that in Kunduz. Its key locations have been overrun by the militants, with government forces retreating to a military base on its fringes.
“Government headquarters, including the governor’s house, police command, and the National Directorate of Security compound, are captured by the Taliban,” Mohammad Noor Rahmani, a Sar-e Pul provincial council member, told Reuters.
ALSO ON RT.COMUS sends B-52 bombers to Afghanistan in bid to stop Taliban offensive, as strategic city of Kunduz sees militants entering
Over the past few days, the Taliban has put the government troops under heavy pressure, apparently switching the focus of its offensive from rural areas to major cities. Two provincial capitals, Zaranj in the southwest and Sheberghan in the north, have already fallen into the hands of the militant group.
 

Mrsrx

Not an expert!
Staff member
Thank you.
I tried visually overlay 2 maps and for me it looks like most of Taliban controlled areas are not densely populated if at all.
Similar to ISIS control maps in Syria and Iraq at their peak outside of Rakka and a few strongholds thay they temporarily controlled. Empty areas are not well defended and have a few villages scattered here and there. Afghan army is not capable to protect the rest and expect things to go back to pre-American invasion. Just a few hundred thousands of dead for no reason. Taliban is still strong there. The absurdity of wars.
 

SeaAb

Legendary Member
Staff member
Super Penguin
Check this thread for more footage on Taliban's latest offensive...
 

Viral

Well-Known Member
Women's beauty salons will be closing now, fala2oona fiyon hol when they invaded. Now, they're leaving like nothing happened. :lol:
Now that the US troops are leaving Afghanistan, why don’t we invite them over to Lebanon to help us build your nation like they did in Afghanistan, Iraq, Libya and Syria?

Imagine how they enter and how they leave these countries all in the name of Democracy, human rights and freedom of expression. They’ve been so busy practicing what they preach they forgot Julian Assange in jail and Edward Sodden in exile….
 
Top