Unrest in Venezuela - Lebanese are coming back

Jo

Administrator
Master Penguin
#1
BEIRUT -- Ten years ago, as violence and insecurity engulfed Venezuela, Sarah Hawi finished high school in the capital, Caracas, and left for Lebanon. For Venezuelan-born and -raised Hawi, the move was a reversal of the migration of her grandfather and later, her parents, who are Lebanese.

She wasn't quite prepared to make the transition. She visited Lebanon the first time three years prior to immigrating. Once she got there, it was an adjustment.

“I was terribly confused. It was a huge change in weather, friends, family, absolutely everything. I wanted to leave,” she recalled of her early days living in Lebanon.

Now, Hawi, a graphic designer and event planner, has learned to speak Arabic and has married a Lebanese man. She has a 6-year-old son, who was born in Lebanon. She speaks to him in Spanish and tells him so much about Venezuela that he’s eager to visit the South American country.

“My heart is Venezuelan, but my blood is Lebanese. And that is something I cannot deny,” she said at a Starbucks on a late afternoon.

Although there is a long history of migration from Lebanon to Venezuela, that flow has been increasingly reversing as Venezuelans with Lebanese roots leave the South American nation to flee its economic and political unrest.

There are more than 12,000 Venezuelans registered at the embassy in Beirut. The majority have Lebanese ancestry, possess dual citizenship, and travel back and forth between the two countries, according to a Venezuelan embassy official.

[...]

One year ago, Jeber Barreto and his wife moved to Beirut from Venezuela. His wife's father was born in the northern town of Bcharre and had moved to Venezuela when he was 16. Barreto and his wife considered moving to Miami, which they visit often and has the largest concentration of Venezuelans outside the country, but they opted for Lebanon.

By then, the couple was expecting their first child and they decided Lebanon would offer their son the best education. Enrolled in one of Lebanon's private schools, which are common throughout the country, their son will learn French, English, and Arabic. He will learn Spanish at home.

“Lebanese people have been very welcoming, affectionate, and have made me feel at home,” said Barreto, who is learning Arabic, but continues to own businesses in Venezuela.

[...]

The steady stream of Venezuelans are slowly finding their way in Lebanon, while adding touches of their home country.

Some small catering businesses have opened where Venezuelan food is prepared in homes and delivered. Raghida Naim, who came from Venezuela 10 years ago, opened Doña Arepa a few years back. She prepares arepas, empanadas, tequeños (fried breaded cheese) and other traditional Venezuelan foods.

Sometimes, demand is so high when there is an event that she rents a restaurant to have enough space to cook.

Despite the success, “I miss my homeland with all my heart, as well as my family and friends,” said Naim.

American University of Beirut has so many Venezuelan students enrolled there is now a Latino student club called Sangre Latina, or Latin Blood with around 100 members – most of them Venezuelan. The club offers Spanish classes and members teach their Lebanese peers about Venezuelan traditions and foods.

Five years ago, as Venezuelans were increasing in numbers, Hawi founded an organization called Venevent. She holds gatherings for the Venezuelan community to get to know each other and feel a taste of home. They recently held a 5K marathon for peace to spread awareness of the conditions back home.

They have also held around 10 protests in Beirut during the past five years over the crisis plaguing the nation they left behind.

In one protest that went viral on social media, Hawi and Rima Koumaira, also Venezuelan-Lebanese, interrupted a speech by a top Venezuelan official in Beirut.

[...]

Rima Koumaira, who protested with Hawi, has been living in Lebanon since 1999, when the late Venezuelan president Hugo Chavez took power. Her father had left the Chouf district in Lebanon for Venezuela when he was 18 years old. It was the 1940s during the third wave of post World War II migration. Her mother also was from Lebanon.

Koumaira grew up in Venezuela and visited Lebanon for the first time after the civil war ended in 1990. She met and married her husband during a visit to Lebanon and the couple returned to Venezuela to live. But by the late 1990s widespread violence and kidnappings were creeping in.

“My husband said, I don’t want this for our children,” Koumaira said.

After 18 years in Lebanon, she and her husband only speak to their children, ages 11 and 18, in Spanish. “If you heard my daughter speak, you would think she grew up in Venezuela,” she said.

“My children love Venezuela,” she said.

Yet, she said she does not feel at home and still feels like a foreigner in Lebanon.

“I am very grateful for Lebanon, but I don’t feel it’s my homeland. If I die, I want to be buried in Venezuela, my beautiful Venezuela that I’m always thinking about,” she said crying.

Full article here: More Venezuelans Immigrate to Lebanon As Crisis Escalates - NBC News
 
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  • gramsci

    Legendary Member
    #2
    most of lebanese in south america are upper class rich..
    chavez revolution brought justice to venezuela poor class..now america through funding terrorism and extreme right wings criminals is trying to retake venezuela and destroy its economic process started by Chavez and spreading caos , and if not a civil war..
    yesterday there was a constitutional referendum in venezuela , and it was flop for the golpist ,president Maduro got the majority and a democratic process is to start in venezuela..
    politics is not based on emotions..so spare this cheap propaganda...chavez an maduro standed beside Lebanon when it was attacked by israel . and usa
     

    Jo

    Administrator
    Master Penguin
    #9
    BEIRUT: A Lebanese couple were killed Friday in Venezuela, state media reported Saturday.

    Gunmen shot and wounded Lebanese national Abdel-Samad al-Asaad and killed his wife Hala al-Asaad, acording to the National News Agency, adding that the couple originally hailed from Akkar.

    Abdel-Samad is undergoing treatment at an unnamed hospital and is in a critical condition.

    Akkar Municipality head Khaled al-Bahri spoke to the NNA and pleaded Lebanon’s Foreign Affairs Ministry to arrange for the repatriation of the body of Hala al-Asaad to Lebanon and to offer support to her husband who is still in Venezuela.

    Local news channel LBCI reported that the Asaads were shot during an armed robbery when gunmen broke into their home.

    Lebanese couple killed in Venezuela | News , Lebanon News | THE DAILY STAR
     

    Muki

    Well-Known Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    #10
    most of lebanese in south america are upper class rich..
    chavez revolution brought justice to venezuela poor class..now america through funding terrorism and extreme right wings criminals is trying to retake venezuela and destroy its economic process started by Chavez and spreading caos , and if not a civil war..
    yesterday there was a constitutional referendum in venezuela , and it was flop for the golpist ,president Maduro got the majority and a democratic process is to start in venezuela..
    politics is not based on emotions..so spare this cheap propaganda...chavez an maduro standed beside Lebanon when it was attacked by israel . and usa
    Oh please. America America America. That's all we hear from you.

    Venezuela is the richest country in the world in terms of oil resources. Their problem is government mismanagement, not foreign intervention.

    Chavez, his successor, and their thugs hoarded the wealth and starved the people... and now the oil price is down, but their economy is not diversified so shit hit the fan. Government mismanagement at its finest.
     

    JeanH

    Well-Known Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    #11
    most of lebanese in south america are upper class rich..
    chavez revolution brought justice to venezuela poor class..now america through funding terrorism and extreme right wings criminals is trying to retake venezuela and destroy its economic process started by Chavez and spreading caos , and if not a civil war..
    yesterday there was a constitutional referendum in venezuela , and it was flop for the golpist ,president Maduro got the majority and a democratic process is to start in venezuela..
    politics is not based on emotions..so spare this cheap propaganda...chavez an maduro standed beside Lebanon when it was attacked by israel . and usa
    communism is a failed system get over it stop blaming others !!
     
    #12
    most of lebanese in south america are upper class rich..
    chavez revolution brought justice to venezuela poor class..now america through funding terrorism and extreme right wings criminals is trying to retake venezuela and destroy its economic process started by Chavez and spreading caos , and if not a civil war..
    yesterday there was a constitutional referendum in venezuela , and it was flop for the golpist ,president Maduro got the majority and a democratic process is to start in venezuela..
    politics is not based on emotions..so spare this cheap propaganda...chavez an maduro standed beside Lebanon when it was attacked by israel . and usa
    Chevez revolution brought justice to poor? Surely not...

    Chavez government backed with high oil prices gave free stuff to lazy people instead of diversifying the economy and creating opportunities, once the Oil prices went down the economy crash leaving more and more people in poverty.

    Maduro Government corruption make the Lebanese politicians look like Saints, he ignores the parliament and rule by degree, make party militias to terrorize the population, postpone elections and arrest the opposition leaders, pack constitution court by his supporters, create a new assembly without any constitutional text and give it powers to override every law or official in the country even overriding the constitution...

    All of that shit ... but they are only good because they don't like USA and Israel... Go see the wealth Chavez children inherited from their 'poor working-class' father and how do they live while the population is starving.
     

    gramsci

    Legendary Member
    #13
    You want to close your multinational production center as a form of economic pressure ? No problem ..
    nationalisation of the means of production is the core of our marxist ideology ,. thank u kellogg's :))):p

    Maduro seizes Kellogg plant after it leaves Venezuela due to crisis

    CARACAS (Reuters) - U.S.-based cereal maker Kellogg Co (K.N) on Tuesday pulled out of Venezuela due to the country’s deep economic crisis, and an angry President Nicolas Maduro said its units would be taken over and given to workers.
     

    Aoune32!

    Active Member
    #14
    12K is nothing :)
    In Australia we have more than 30K with dual citizenships living in Lebanon. Even still get getting welfare from here some of them.
     

    Isabella

    The Queen Of "Bazella"
    Orange Room Supporter
    #18
    Apparently, what I heard from Lebanese Venezuelan friends, he's doing a really shitty job
    Watch the video I just posted above, Venezuelans are literally starving and they're calling it the maduro diet, and this guy is so tone deaf that he stuffs his face on live tv! It's beyond shitty job at this point lol
     

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