• Before posting an article from a specific source, check this list here to see how much the Orange Room trust it. You can also vote/change your vote based on the source track record.

US historic and continuous involvement in Venezuela before and after Hugo Chavez.

V

Viral

Active Member
Guido's latest move: Make it or break it.
If doesn't deliver soon, his ass is grass.
He must be looking at Baghdadi and praying his sponsors won't let him down and dump him in some dark prison cell for years to come if their experiment in Venezuela fails as it did in Syria and Iraq.
 
  • Advertisement
  • fidelio

    fidelio

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    Guido's latest move: Make it or break it.
    If doesn't deliver soon, his ass is grass.
    He must be looking at Baghdadi and praying his sponsors won't let him down and dump him in some dark prison cell for years to come if their experiment in Venezuela fails as it did in Syria and Iraq.
    This is the end of Guaido. He will be lucky if he gets political asylum somewhere safe enough for him to retire or wait for a better momentum. Calling for a coup when he lost the popular momentum and the the army stood its ground can only be interpreted as diversion to run and seek cover.
     
    V

    Viral

    Active Member
    This is the end of Guaido. He will be lucky if he gets political asylum somewhere safe enough for him to retire or wait for a better momentum. Calling for a coup when he lost the popular momentum and the the army stood its ground can only be interpreted as diversion to run and seek cover.
    They're always too drunk on Kool-Aid. They never have time to read history.
     
    fidelio

    fidelio

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    They're always too drunk on Kool-Aid. They never have time to read history.
    Guaido thought he was the new Obama and has a very high self-esteem, something he was useful for. Well now the play is over and everybody will go home and Maduro will live to see another day or two more. Better luck next time, or still, better elections...
     
    V

    Viral

    Active Member
    Guaido thought he was the new Obama and has a very high self-esteem, something he was useful for. Well now the play is over and everybody will go home and Maduro will live to see another day or two more. Better luck next time, or still, better elections...
    Puppets like Guaido need to know, unlike Obama, Trump has no patience for successful results to materialize. He files bankruptcies in no time and starts all over again on new projects. Guaido need to look at Trumps short history in office how many of his closest and loyal advisors were quickly let go.
    Not to mention how he starts attacking his Rocket man then turns around and call him good man.
    Pulling out of Syria and Afghanistan is another example of trump not interested in long term investment conflicts. By nature , he wants quick results.
     
    V

    Viral

    Active Member
    Excellent article for Juan Guaido to read.

    Guaido rolls the dice, a Stars & Stripes dice, in Venezuela

    Guaido rolls the dice, a Stars & Stripes dice, in Venezuela


    Juan Guaido and his supporters in Venezuela, among them elements of the Venezuelan military, have rolled the dice – a Stars and Stripes dice – in a desperate bid to overturn not Nicolas Maduro but democracy in Caracas.
    At the behest of Washington the Venezuelan opposition leader has embarked on a reckless gambit that carries with it overtones of Guatemala in 1954; Brazil 1964; Chile 1973; Nicaragua 1979-1990; El Salvador 1979-1992; Grenada 1983; and Haiti 1994. In other words, in 2019 Washington has reverted to the blood-soaked imperialist type in its dealings with Latin and South America, a part of the world it has always considered its property and sought possession via local proxies, the latest of which is the eminently forgettable Mr Juan Guaido.
    The issue now is up to the Venezuelan people and military, entwined in a symbiotic relationship, the outcome of which will have ramifications not only for Venezuela but the entire region. To what extent they stand firm and are willing to resist this latest in a long line of sordid Washington-backed, triggered and provoked regime change coups, we are about to find out. International solidarity with the Venezuelan people and their legitimate government is also crucial now, given the stakes involved for everyone who believes that injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere.
    As we have come to expect, the usual suspects in the form of the clutch of US European satellites, long ago made their peace with the devil. And so it is on this occasion; falling into line behind their imperial and hegemonic master, each vying to proclaim their support for the coup attempt in Caracas the loudest in the manner of children competing for the approval of their impossible to please daddy.
    Those who continue to harbour the belief that the welfare of the Venezuelan people has anything whatsoever to do with the events now underway only confirm the timeless wisdom of legendary Venezuelan leader Simon Bolivar, otherwise known as ‘El Liberator’. To paraphrase: “Ignorant people,” he reminds us, are the blind instrument of their own destruction.”
    No, this ugly and wretched business in Venezuela has nothing, not a thing, to do with its people or their welfare. It has everything to do with seizing back control of the country's vast oil reserves in the interests of US and Western oil companies, in league with an entrenched local oligarchy which since the very minute Hugo Chavez came to power in 1999 on the back of a popular program of land reform, wealth redistribution, social justice and anti-imperialism, has been plotting, scheming and conspiring to revert the country back to its previous owners with the open connivance of a neocon and liberal interventionist establishment in the US.
    Bolton and his neocon chums are prisoners rather than students of history. Because if they were students, they would know that when the ‘idea’ of an empire is no longer able to sustain it in its power, all the military force in the world cannot hope to save it. The Persian, Greek, Roman, Ottoman, French and British Empires all went the same way and all for the same fundamental reason – namely that oppression breeds resistance and resistance to oppression carries a truth far more powerful than any number of aircraft carriers.
    When Hugo Chavez said, “I hereby accuse the North American Empire of being the biggest menace to our planet,” he unleashed a thunderbolt of unimpeachable truth that belong in the tradition of all who have dared stand in defiance of the most violent and destructive power the world has ever known.
    Unless Juan Guaido is a complete madman he must know something that we don't, something along the lines of impending direct US military support for his coup attempt. Because what we do know is that the forces of imperialism thrive on pretext, and in inviting a heavy and entirely justifiable response by the security and military forces loyal to Venezuela's legitimately elected government, Mr Guaido is engaged in a high stakes game that will either see him rewarded with garlands in Washington or handcuffs in Caracas.
    Whatever happens, the words of celebrated Cuban national liberation icon, Jose Marti, loom large: “I have lived inside the monster and know its entrails; and my sling is David's.” If today there is one people intimately acquainted with the entrails of this US hegemonic beast, it is the Venezuelan people.
    Their sling will certainly need to be David's if they are to prevail in this, perhaps, their most perilous hour.
     
    Last edited:
    V

    Viral

    Active Member
    Nice guy...

    Bolton calls for ‘regime change’ in Venezuela soon
    Bolton calls for ‘regime change’ in Venezuela soon
     
    V

    Viral

    Active Member

    Coup fizzles? Guaido’s mentor seeks refuge in Chile’s Venezuela embassy

    Coup fizzles? Guaido’s mentor seeks refuge in Chile’s Venezuela embassy


    Opposition politician Leopoldo Lopez and his family have sought refuge at a diplomatic residence in Caracas, Chile’s foreign minister said. The development could point to the failure of a coup attempt by Lopez and Juan Guaido.
    Lopez had been under house arrest since 2017, but was seen at the side of Guaido – who had declared himself “interim president” of Venezuela in January – on Tuesday morning, as supporters of the US-backed opposition sought to take control of Caracas by force. At least 50 people were injured and 11 arrested during the unrest on Tuesday.
    By the afternoon, however, Chilean Foreign Minister Roberto Ampuero tweeted that Lopez, his wife Lilian Tintori, and their daughter were “guests” of the Chilean diplomatic mission in Caracas, adding that “Chile reaffirms commitment to Venezuelan democrats.”
    Meanwhile, at least 25 armed Guaido supporters have sought refuge in the Brazilian embassy in Caracas, Brazilian media reported. There were no officers among them, according to reports.
    The flight of Lopez and his family suggests that Guaido’s effort to win over the Venezuelan military and police – with verbal support from Washington – may have failed, as the majority of the security forces apparently remained loyal to President Nicolas Maduro.
    Lopez founded Voluntad Popular, the party Guaido represents in the National Assembly. The legislative body was last elected in 2015, and Maduro’s government considers it defunct following the 2017 Constituent Assembly election.
    During the 2014 protests in Venezuela, Lopez was arrested and charged with arson, conspiracy, murder and terrorism. Some of the charges were dropped, but he was found guilty of inciting violence in September 2015 and sentenced to almost 14 years in prison. He was placed under house arrest in July 2017, until he reappeared in public on Tuesday morning.
     
    V

    Viral

    Active Member
    Venezuela’s fight for freedom

    Anyone remembers Fox News and the Arab Spring:lol:
     
    V

    Viral

    Active Member
    Venezuela’s opposition put together a serious plan. For now, it appears to have failed.


    Venezuelan opposition supporters gather Wednesday to protest the Maduro government in the streets of Caracas. (Michael Robinson Chavez/The Washington Post)
    For weeks, the Venezuelan opposition had been working on a comprehensive blueprint to finally force President Nicolás Maduro from office. Several of his top military and civilian aides were said to have been persuaded to switch sides, while others would be allowed to leave the country. There was a strong suggestion that Maduro himself might peacefully fly to Havana.
    “They produced a pretty full plan,” a U.S. official said of the opposition. Implementation was tentatively set for Wednesday, although no date had been finalized.
    On Monday, however, the plan started to fall apart.:argh:
     
    Dynamite Joe

    Dynamite Joe

    Well-Known Member
    Neocolonialism at work... "U.S. officials expressed fury at the Venezuelans close to Maduro who they believe double-crossed them." In other words, the U.S. army of corruption bribed officials in Maduro's circle to double cross their leader and now they are expressing fury that instead they were double crossed. The irony...

    Venezuela's Failed Uprising: How a Deal to Oust Maduro Unraveled

    Ethan Bronner and Andrew Rosati
    BloombergMay 3, 2019


    Venezuela's Failed Uprising: How a Deal to Oust Maduro Unraveled


    (Bloomberg) -- Maybe Venezuela’s most famous political prisoner, Leopoldo Lopez, was the thread that unraveled it all.
    The overthrow that sputtered began when opposition lawmaker Juan Guaido tried to spark an uprising in Caracas on Tuesday, standing not only with masked soldiers who had defected but Lopez, his mentor and a cult figure in some circles. That dramatic turn sent a signal that this wasn’t mere posturing. To many watching, it seemed the opposition plan to replace President Nicolas Maduro was finally moving swiftly forward.

    But it turns out that Lopez’s first appearance in public in years might actually have had the opposite effect and helped doom a deal two months in the making. It was a surprise to some in the Maduro regime who had, after talks with the opposition, agreed to take part in a handover of power. They consider Lopez an unreliable hothead and that contributed to their decision to pull out, some insiders said, along with the fact that they hadn’t been given any warning about the hastily organized event.
    The Trump administration and Guaido’s team are still trying to figure out what went wrong. Whether Lopez was a killer straw is just one riddle for them. Lopez himself said late Thursday there shouldn’t have been any confusion. He told reporters that before he was freed from house arrest Tuesday, he had been speaking for weeks with “commanders, generals, representatives of different branches of the armed forces and police.”

    The U.S. is pointing to the breadth of the failed plot as evidence that, no matter how badly it went, Maduro’s days are numbered with the country having plunged into dysfunction and the economy in a shambles. “This was just the tip of the iceberg,” said a senior administration official who asked not to be named. Many close to Maduro were in on the endgame, the official said, and their eagerness to send him packing shows how isolated he is.

    Failure, though, exacts a price. The question in Washington and Caracas is how high. One Venezuelan with ties to people in the opposition described them as now “paralyzed.”

    Any way it’s sliced, the bust of what Guaido called Operation Liberty is a major setback, said Rocio San Miguel, president of the watchdog group Control Ciudadano. “The opposition took a step backward with the military,” which the opposition needs to win over to succeed. “Guaido appearing with Lopez at a single point in the city with a few dozen soldiers and no major firepower showed their weakness.”

    Lopez’s clandestine release from house arrest by the feared Sebin intelligence agency was but one step in a complex transition negotiated with top aides to Maduro, not all of whom were speaking to one another, according to people in Washington and Caracas familiar with the negotiations and who insisted on anonymity because of the sensitivity of the talks.

    And within hours, the deal between the opposition and the Maduro camp was dead. Lopez ultimately sought refuge in the Spanish ambassador’s residence in Caracas, emerging briefly Thursday to talk to reporters. U.S. officials expressed fury at the Venezuelans close to Maduro who they believe double-crossed them.

    Those singled out by National Security Adviser John Bolton -- the defense minister, the supreme court president and the head of the presidential guard -- were central players in a large cast discussing how to abandon Maduro and recognize Guaido as the interim president, according to the people familiar with the negotiations.

    Lopez was released because the Sebin intelligence chief, General Manuel Christopher Figuera, was fully on board, the people said. As part of the arrangement, Figuera’s wife flew to safety in the U.S. on Sunday. On Tuesday night, after Figuera released a letter explaining his decision, Maduro replaced him as intelligence chief. Figuera has left Venezuela, according to two opposition officials, though they said they don’t where he has gone.

    In trying to explain where things went wrong, Secretary of State Michael Pompeo blamed the Russians who, he said, intervened at the last minute. Maduro had got wind of the deal a day earlier and when Guaido and Lopez appeared at the base, the besieged president was rushed into a bunker and planned to escape to Cuba, according to two people familiar with the situation. Russia told him to stay put, Pompeo said. Officials in Russia and Cuba have denied it as has Maduro.

    “Many of us thought, as the weeks went by, that it was astonishing Maduro hadn’t discovered it already but that may be because so many on the inside wanted it to succeed,” one person familiar with the matter said. “They believe Maduro began to get an understanding of what was happening on the 29th and they had to move on the 30th or it would all collapse.”

    One Venezuelan involved said he blamed Lopez for “unilaterally” insisting on appearing in public on Tuesday morning. He said Lopez pushed for it and Guaido relented.

    Other speculation falls on Defense Minister Vladimir Padrino Lopez who, according to one person close to the situation, was engaged in the negotiations while informing Maduro and his Russian and Cuban allies of the talks. The defense minister was with Maduro when the president gave a speech at the military academy in Caracas Thursday.

    The other two key officials -- Maikel Moreno, president of the supreme court, and Ivan Rafael Hernandez Dala, head of both the presidential guard and of military counterintelligence -- were readier to make the transition work, that person said. Those two, Figuera and Padrino are among the individuals who have been sanctioned by the U.S., where their assets have been blocked.

    But it may be that many more balked. There was confusion over who would make the first move, according to a person close to the situation. It could be that there were so many participants that one hand often didn’t know what the other was doing.

    The talks began when Venezuelans with links to top officials in the regime and the opposition offered to act as bridges. At least one of those intermediaries is under U.S. sanctions and was seeking leniency, three people familiar with the deal said.

    U.S. officials have said repeatedly that senior Venezuelan officials willing to shift their allegiance to Guaido would be removed from various sanctions. The U.S. has led more than 50 countries in recognizing Guaido since January as interim president because Maduro re-election last year was rigged, rendering it invalid.

    Elliott Abrams, the State Department’s special envoy for Venezuela, told a Venezuelan television station Wednesday that “a majority of the high command were talking with the Supreme Court and Juan Guaido about a change in government with the departure of Maduro and with guarantees for the military.”

    He said the negotiations had created a 15-point document that included a “dignified exit” for Maduro and recognition by the high court of Guaido as interim president with elections within a year. It had been widely assumed that Leopoldo Lopez, a former mayor of a wealthy district in Caracas, would be a leading candidate.

    On Thursday, a Caracas court issued a warrant for Lopez, revoking his house arrest and ordering him to spend the remaining eight years of his 13-year sentence in Ramo Verde military prison; he was convicted of charges including arson and instigating violence after spearheading anti-government protests. The Spanish foreign ministry said on its website that Lopez would “under no circumstances” be handed over to Venezuelan authorities.

    Lopez said he had no intention of returning to the prison where he spent three years.

    “I spent two years in complete isolation at Ramo Verde,” he said. “It was not easy. I was tortured. I don’t want to go back to jail, because jail is hell. But I’m not afraid of jail, just like I’m not afraid of Maduro.”
     
    V

    Viral

    Active Member

    Venezuela's Maduro says turncoat general 'recruited by CIA' was mastermind of failed coup


    Venezuela's Maduro says turncoat general 'recruited by CIA' was mastermind of failed coup


    Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro has named his former intelligence chief a mastermind behind the recent botched coup attempt, claiming Caracas has proof that he was recruited by the Central Intelligence Agency over a year ago.
    During a televised speech on Friday, Maduro unleashed an attack on General Manuel Ricardo Cristopher Figuera, former director general of Venezuela's National Intelligence Service (SEBIN), who defected from Maduro's side in the wake of the failed military coup on April, 30. The coup attempt fizzled out within hours as it failed to attract broad support from the military, having been orchestrated by a small group of soldiers.
    Maduro said that investigators were able to determine that Figuera was the driving force behind the attempt, and was apparently doing it at the behest of Washington.
    "Investigations have succeeded in proving that General Manuel Ricardo Cristopher Figuera has been recruited by the CIA for more than a year," Maduro said, adding that justice would be served on the "traitor" Figuera "sooner rather than later."
    After the coup flopped, opposition leader Juan Guadio, recognized as 'interim president' of Venezuela by the US and some 50 other countries, lamented that the opposition did not have enough manpower and supporters within government circles.
    While the opposition seemed to have been poorly prepared for a decisive push to topple Maduro, it might be explained by the fact that Figuera was apparently in a hurry to rush the coup before his imminent arrest.
    Maduro revealed that he was given head-ups by Defense Minister Vladimir Padrino, Supreme Court chief Maikel Moreno and chief of the General Directorate of Military Counterintelligence, Iván Hernández Dala, about Figuera's "strange behavior" in run-up to the coup attempt.
    Figuera was going to be fired and arrested at 9:00 am on April 30, and that is what apparently prompted the defector general to set the coup in motion, Maduro said.
    The president also accused the former spy chief of spreading false rumors about Padrino and Moreno's intent to join the opposition, both considered "honorable patriots" by Maduro.
    Figuera became one of the most senior officials to switch sides and join the Guaido-led opposition. In a letter circulated after he broke ranks with Maduro, he wrote that his decision was prompted by his desire to "rebuild the country" and fight rampant corruption.
    His defection earned lavish praise from US Vice President Mike Pence, who cited Figuera's example as a rallying call for those Venezuelan serviceman who don't want to suffer under US sanctions. Pence personally announced the lifting of all sanctions from Figuera on Tuesday, commending him for "taking a stand for the Bolivarian constitution and libertad."
     
    Top