What is the breaking point for you to leave your political party ?

D

dyyyy

Well-Known Member
Most people here belong to political parties, and I can safely say that all political parties has taken controversial decisions which in a way you didn't believe in.

Now of course in a party you get a sense of belonging and you tend to forgive mistakes, which is normal because no party would survive if at every mistake the partisans turn against it.

So the main question is, what do you think is your breaking point, what is the wrong decision or (maybe the number of wrong decisions) that makes you decide that you no longer belong there.
 
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  • AtheistForJesus

    AtheistForJesus

    Well-Known Member
    When my party's leader is appointed instead of democratically elected. This should been the breaking point for most Aounists.
     
    shadow1

    shadow1

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    To me the break-point is when my closest friends stop pretending to believe the justifications I give for my party's lies, deceit, inertia, corruption and incompetence. It's then that I tell them to go **** themselves and I start looking for a new friends.
     
    oldschool

    oldschool

    Active Member
    I would gladly leave FPM if I believed others left theirs or that the ones who are indépendant are any better.

    Even though I think fpm is being unfairly presented, I would say it’s a small sacrifice for the greater good.

    The problem is, I’m lebanese and I know lebanese. I see right through all the bullshit and politically correct statements and I see right through the silliness of militias disguising.

    Our problem isn’t the parties or the leaders. It’s silly to think 5 guys have shaped how a population behaves. We have free elections. We have an army that doesn’t fight it’s people. Our parties are simply a representation of how the population is.
     
    Orangina

    Orangina

    Well-Known Member
    Most people here belong to political parties, and I can safely say that all political parties has taken controversial decisions which in a way you didn't believe in.

    Now of course in a party you get a sense of belonging and you tend to forgive mistakes, which is normal because no party would survive if at every mistake the partisans turn against it.

    So the main question is, what do you think is your breaking point, what is the wrong decision or (maybe the number of wrong decisions) that makes you decide that you no longer belong there.
    why dont u start by yourself?
     
    Chingon

    Chingon

    Well-Known Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    Nice thread. A lot of red signals for me, starting from the sectarian tone FPM adopted, that naturally crept up on me and I started using the same tone when talking to friends and here on the forum. As a teenager I was easily influenced by it and I wonder how much damage it has done to other teenagers in Lebanon, a lot of whom are probably still using the same tone and haven't seen through the bullshit yet.

    The breaking point for me was the appointment of gibran bassil as the head of a party that claimed to fight feudalism. Having grown up in a kataeb family and feudalist mount lebanon, I was longing for the moment this practice ends. I was away from Lebanese politics for years, and when I started reading news again I see GA's daughters and in-laws running the show in the party and the palace, while great secular activists have been sidelined and victimised. I should have listened to @shadow1 a long time ago. So much energy and time wasted.
     
    Lebanon_not_Arabic

    Lebanon_not_Arabic

    Well-Known Member
    Nice thread,

    Now of course in a party you get a sense of belonging and you tend to forgive mistakes, which is normal because no party would survive if at every mistake the partisans turn against it.
    It depends on the gravity and frequency of those "mistakes".

    So the main question is, what do you think is your breaking point, what is the wrong decision or (maybe the number of wrong decisions) that makes you decide that you no longer belong there.
    Well, you said it yourself: when you no longer feel you belong there.

    Either you changed, or they changed.

    .
     
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    D

    dyyyy

    Well-Known Member
    why dont u start by yourself?
    I won't tell the party, because I don't want this conversation to turn into LF/FPM and who's better

    From my part I have no idea how it happened...I think I just started drifting away (I was never engaged, just a supporter) and it was gradually from supporter, to taking distance but still sympathizing (i.e I was more critical when they did smthg wrong but i still find them better than the others), to completely neutral and finding the party just like any other party.
     
    Orangina

    Orangina

    Well-Known Member
    honestly.
    I won't tell the party, because I don't want this conversation to turn into LF/FPM and who's better

    From my part I have no idea how it happened...I think I just started drifting away (I was never engaged, just a supporter) and it was gradually from supporter, to taking distance but still sympathizing (i.e I was more critical when they did smthg wrong but i still find them better than the others), to completely neutral and finding the party just like any other party.
    honestly speaking.. ma fhemna shi
     
    oldschool

    oldschool

    Active Member
    Interesting, shou li mesh rade 3anno mn FPM?
    That wasnt my point. I meant even if i was happy 100% with FPM, and the price for change in Lebanon was to let go of FPM, i gladly would. The issue is i dont believe any of the people who are running their mouthes now.

    Honestly, i look around and i dont see good people, at least not in a majority way. Most of the good people around me are in FPM. FPM initially attracted those who were sick of militias. Yaane kel wahad ma ken az3ar ended up in FPM.

    Many left, sure. But who do i see in this hirak?

    1- LF and Kataeb pathetically trying to disguise themselves
    2- PSP doing the same
    3- taalbaaya, Saadnayal Nusra sympathizers
    4- Tripoli Rifi and Hariri supporters and Idlib chants
    5- Social opportunists and idiot "instagram influencers"
    6- Ze3ran and silly people, i dont see m3attarin and goodness in them. Look at how they behave with people who oppose them
    7- Leftists with evil hate towards my community
    8- Other leftists with antiquated useless programs
    9- A minority of good well meaning people.

    Baadon el 3alam yalle byechbahune bil tayyar.


    What am i not happy with? I will tell you. The choice of cadres, the media strategy, the disconnect with the new youth, the over-reliance on politics and not on activism, over mseyara to Hariri and other terkibet, etc....

    I think FPM were a net positive in the lebanese political equation. They didnt achieve what i hoped, but lets remembers 80% or whatever of the lebanese population FREELY VOTED for other parties.

    Ano am i suposed to blame FPM for the electricity file when i see that Abu KHalil blocked the plant for 10 years?
    Or that the others simply delayed and blocked and opposed and never offered alternatives?

    Am i supposed to blame FPM for the monetary policy when they went to battle to change Riad Saleme and he was iron clad defended by the local and international powers?

    Am i supposed to blame FPM for allying with hezballah when the alternative in 2006 was a sunni shiite civil war by isolating hezballah and targeting it?


    FPM vs tonzir, yes FPM fails, because tonzir is very easy. I can imagine 100000 things that would be better.

    But fut bel siyesse, t3emal maa whats around you, and then judge on what can be achieved or not.
     
    SAVO

    SAVO

    New Member
    party can come and go... the ideology remain... the party is a group of people .. and they can make right and wrong decisions..
     
    Jorje

    Jorje

    Legendary Member
    With FPM, "breaking point" was in 2006 when it became clear that principles are secondary to the narrow personal and political interests of Aoun.
    I was fooled in 2005. I didn't really know Aoun's history, but his 2005 speech sounded very appealing; it was basically what the Thawra is calling for now. I should have seen the signs that the only reason they went with that particular electoral platform was because Aoun wasn't given enough seats by his current allies.

    I pity the fools who are now seeing the light, 15 years later. Fi ktir will never see it, so I guess it's better than nothing. But I have to say it's nice to brag. We told you 15 years before that this whole thing "change from inside" is a sham, and we have all the receipts to prove it.

    Parties are a vehicle, ya jame3a, to reach a certain goal. No one should "belong" to a party. You can support or not, but they are vehicles to reach a goal, not a substitute for family, country or whatever.

    It's very tough for the Lebanese Jins to deal with their politicians in this manner. We do not hold people accountable, we do not even watch what they say, never mind watch how they act (which is even more important). They lie in the face of their supporters 10 times in the same day, but it does not change anything.
     
    I

    illusion84

    New Member
    Beating up protestors and sending them to hospitals.

    Engaging in political deals full of corruptions.

    Destroying the last green areas of Lebanon so that some crooks gain some money.

    Nepotism.

    Refusing free elections.

    Focusing on the strategic game of the Middle East and forgetting about the local needs of the people.
     
    Basba_aa

    Basba_aa

    Well-Known Member
    Most people here belong to political parties, and I can safely say that all political parties has taken controversial decisions which in a way you didn't believe in.

    Now of course in a party you get a sense of belonging and you tend to forgive mistakes, which is normal because no party would survive if at every mistake the partisans turn against it.

    So the main question is, what do you think is your breaking point, what is the wrong decision or (maybe the number of wrong decisions) that makes you decide that you no longer belong there.
    There is NO need for anyone to leave any "political" party. Most of the world's governments are made up of political parties.
    As Dr. Kamal Deeb had put it.
    It is ALL up to the individual to just wake up and STOP BENDING OVER backwards for his/her corrupt or "pretending" NOT to be corrupt leaders.

    As long as ALL parties compete with one another for the sake of and improving the country and being totally loyal ONLY to it and NOT to anyone else, taking pride in achievements that benefit the people and NOT their own pockets, their foreign accounts and their own families, or even destroying a whole country several times for the sake of other despots, theoc_rats, partners and boy:friends and then claim "FAKE" victory or a "HOLY" one.

    In Lebanon, as most corrupt and failed states around the world and early European countries, the usual trend had it that loyalty must be to the "leaders" of those parties who in return is loyal in small percentage to their goons, mostly to themselves, their cohorts and their own future.

    Feeding, supporting and nourishing such greed will ONLY mess you up and your progeny's future, result is the revolt at hand.

    Last time, it was when the people's had enough of trash management, where the politicians argued who pays for it to go away, and when the people told them ALL, "You ALL stink", but that movement died pretty fast and the stench was redirected towards the people by party bullies, thugs and PR decadents who suck "leaders'" phallic to keep their jobs and their bosses in power.

    I truly hope that this "Revolt" is the real deal.

    Just think of your own progeny's future and then ask yourselves;
    "Do I really want my children to swim in more of the same fecal matter made by our "leaders and death merchants" disguised as either beneficial or holy?"

    In my opinion, I believe that if you are loyal to other countries or despots, leaders or theocrats then you should either be exiled(sent to that country or leaders you so much adore) or tried for treason with a severe penalty.

    Thank you for reading and for the good question too.
     
    Picasso

    Picasso

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    Nice thread, clever idea, we need more of the kind!
    ~
    I was a serious and committed supporter of HA. There were two breaking points for me, one local and another regional.

    First one, the way HA dealt with Sayyed Fadlallah.
    Second one, the way Khamenaei & the conservatives dealt with Sayyed Khatami.

    After that, especially in Iran 2009, it was all crystal clear.

    If they deal in that way with people of this high caliber along with their reform programs, then imagine what would they do to others!
     
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    AtheistForJesus

    AtheistForJesus

    Well-Known Member
    Nice thread, clever idea, we need more of the kind!
    ~
    I was a serious and committed supporter of HA. There were two breaking points for me, one local and another regional.

    First one, the way HA dealt with Sayyed Fadlallah.
    Second one, the way Khamenaei & the conservatives dealt with Sayyed Khatami.

    After that, especially in Iran 2009, it was all crystal clear.

    If they deal in that way with people of this high caliber along with their reform programs, then imagine what would they do to others!
    You should be ashamed of your past.
     
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