Whisteblower Ukraine : Trump Impeachment’s or Biden Corruption in Ukraine

Should

  • Trump will be impeached by House

    Votes: 5 71.4%
  • Trump will resign

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Trump will not resign and will be supported by Senate

    Votes: 3 42.9%
  • Biden campaign is over because of his son corruption in Ukraine

    Votes: 2 28.6%
  • Biden will not be affected

    Votes: 2 28.6%

  • Total voters
    7
NiceV

NiceV

Well-Known Member
September 23, 2019 - 07:26 PM EDT
Pressure on Pelosi to impeach Trump grows

BY SCOTT WONG 1,699
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Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) is holding firm against impeaching Donald Trump, even as she comes under fresh pressure from frustrated progressives to take a stand on the president’s alleged political pressure campaign on Ukraine.

Reports that Trump in a July call pressured Ukraine President Volodymyr Zelensky to investigate former Vice President Joe Biden and his son Hunter Biden are raising howls from Democrats, who are casting it as Trump’s most egregious act in a long string of controversies.


But the startling new developments have not appeared to change Pelosi’s strategy on impeachment, a path she’s warned could be politically perilous for her party in 2020.

Sources close to Pelosi say, barring some earth-shattering development, the Speaker is unlikely to make a dramatic 180-degree turn on her impeachment position.

“This is chess, not checkers,” said one Democratic source, describing the Speaker’s big-picture approach to the impeachment question.

In both public and private, Pelosi, a 32-year House veteran who did not make any public remarks on Monday, has argued that Democrats should aggressively investigate Trump but shouldn’t move on impeachment without overwhelming support from the public and buy-in from Republicans, who control the Senate.

Some moderate House Democrats fear that impeachment could spark a backlash from voters and cost them Trump-district seats that helped propel the party to the majority in 2018. Freshman Rep. Conor Lamb (D-Pa.), who represents a district Trump won in 2016, called out the president in a statement Monday without mentioning the “I-word.”

“We cannot allow even the possibility to exist that our President used the immense power of that office to protect his own selfish interests, rather than to protect the American people. The safety and security of all Americans is at stake in Ukraine and anywhere that our adversaries threaten the cause of freedom,” Lamb said. “As lawmakers, we swore an oath to protect and defend the Constitution. We will get the truth.”

But in a sign of the growing pressure on Pelosi — and how the politics within her caucus are evolving — another moderate freshman Democrat, Dean Phillips of Minnesota, said he would back impeachment if the reports turn out to be true.

“This continues a pattern of behavior that is corrupt at best, treasonous at worst, and puts our rule of law at risk,” Phillips said in a statement Monday. “If the reports are corroborated, we must pursue articles of impeachment and report them to the full House of Representatives for immediate consideration.”

House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff, a fellow California Democrat and Pelosi ally, appeared to break with the Speaker on Sunday, telling CNN that impeachment may be the “only remedy” if it turns out Trump threatened to withhold $250 million in foreign aid unless Ukraine investigated Biden. Trump confirmed he discussed Biden with Ukraine’s leader, but on Monday he said he never mentioned or threatened to withhold military aid.

“I did not make a statement that you have to do this or I’m not going to give you aid,” Trump told reporters on the sidelines of the United Nations General Assembly.

“I wouldn’t do that. With that being said, what I want is, I want — you know, we’re giving a lot of money away to Ukraine and other places. You want to see a country that’s going to be not corrupt,” Trump continued.

Schiff made clear that he was not rushing headlong into the impeachment push, which he called an “extraordinary remedy” in an interview with CNN’s Jake Tapper.

And it’s safe to assume Pelosi wasn’t caught off guard by Schiff’s “remedy” line. The Speaker spoke to Schiff several times over the weekend to coordinate their messaging on the Ukraine story, a source familiar with the
conversations told The Hill.

Pelosi, Schiff and other top Democrats will be closely watching what happens on Thursday. That’s when Joseph Maguire, Trump’s acting director of national intelligence, will publicly testify before Schiff’s Intelligence panel. Maguire is refusing to turn over to Congress a whistleblower complaint about Trump’s alleged “promise” to Ukraine, even though the intelligence community’s inspector general, Michael Atkinson, has reviewed the complaint and called it an “urgent concern.”

Democrats also are demanding that the White House release the transcript of the call between Trump and Zelensky, which would clarify what exactly was said about the foreign aid, Biden and Biden’s son, who had business interests in Ukraine.

“I think she can” stave off the impeachment calls. “But the facts this week — if we get them from the horse’s mouth — could change that,” one moderate House Democrat, who publicly does not back impeachment, told The Hill on Monday.

“We will need actual facts and transcripts. It can’t be a he said, she said.”

In a Sunday letter to rank-and-file Democrats, Pelosi has warned that such stonewalling from the Trump administration would propel Democrats “into a whole new stage of investigation.” But she stopped short of saying it would directly lead to impeachment.

“I don’t see movement yet” on impeachment, said one House Democrat who has opposed impeachment.

Pelosi’s reticence — especially after the bombshell Trump-Ukraine reports — has infuriated progressives who see it as their constitutional duty to impeach the president. They say she refused to advance impeachment after the April release of the Mueller report, which raised serious questions about whether Trump obstructed the Russia investigation. She refused to budge after Mueller testified before Congress that his investigation did not exonerate the president.

And Pelosi has stayed the course as the Trump administration has stonewalled Democratic investigators at every turn.

“Her position at this point makes no sense. Who knows what will move her, honestly,” said one senior Democratic source on Capitol Hill. “The fair election is the foundation of our democracy. Trump used his position to pressure a foreign government into subjugating our most sacred process.”

Other veteran Democrats in Washington predicted that Pelosi would not be able to stem the rising tide of support for impeachment from rank-and-file Democrats, some members of her own leadership team, and 2020 presidential candidates including Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.), Sen. Cory Booker (D-N.J.) and former Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julián Castro.

“I appreciate what the Speaker’s done so far, but I’m not so sure she can delay any longer. I’d be surprised if she doesn’t make some sort of significant move by the end of the week, sooner rather than later,” said Jim Manley, a former top aide to former Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.).

“It’s just become an untenable position; just doing nothing is no longer sustainable. Whether the moderates get on board or not remains to be seen. But if they don’t, I think they’ll get run over,” Manley added.
 
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  • NiceV

    NiceV

    Well-Known Member
    ember 23, 2019 - 08:47 PM EDT
    Murphy blasts GOP on whistleblower response: 'We're watching this country turn into a banana republic'

    BY JORDAIN CARNEY 680
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    Sen. Chris Murphy (D-Conn.) knocked Republicans on Monday over a largely muted response to a whistleblower complaint reportedly linked to President Trump.

    "This is an extraordinary moment. We're watching this country turn into a banana republic. Republicans better be careful what they wish for because a Democratic president could use the same tools that Donald Trump is using to turn the White House into just one big extension of his reelection campaign," Murphy told reporters.

    "This is just a head shaking moment for me that Republicans don't give a damn about the national security of this country and are willing to let the president get away with this fundamental corruption. If that is the direction that they take—attacking the whistleblower, trying to cover up this corruption, it's a really, really sad day for the country," Murphy added.

    Murphy's comments come after he was told about Sen. John Cornyn (R-Texas) questioning if the whistleblower at the center of the current scandal is a "leaker."

    "Is it a whistleblower or a leaker? I don't know which," Cornyn said, asked about the whistleblower complaint and if it should be turned over to lawmakers.

    Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) while urging Trump to be transparent about a phone call with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky, has also called for an investigation into former Vice President Joe Biden and his son, Hunter Biden.

    "I think the best way to do this, quite frankly, and that’s a good question, is for somebody independent of politics to ... look, it doesn’t have to be a special counsel, but to look at the substance of that interview. Was any money paid to the Bidens, Hunter Biden? What was it paid for? Was there any interaction between the prosecutor being dismissed and these transactions?" Graham told radio host Hugh Hewitt on Monday.

    Several Republican senators declined to directly weigh in on Monday, arguing that they didn't have enough information about the complaint and the allegation that Trump or his lawyer Rudy Giuliani attempted to persuade Zelensky to investigate Biden or his son.

    Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) knocked Democrats for trying to "politicize" the complaint, but sidestepped weighing in on the substance of the allegation against Trump. He noted that Senate Intelligence Committee Chairman Richard Burr (R-N.C.) is trying to set up a closed-door briefing with the intelligence community inspector general.

    Sen. John Thune (R-S.D.), the No. 2 Senate Republican, similarly pointed to the committee as a starting point for lawmakers.

    "My understanding is that Burr is trying to get the inspector general and the DNI to come up in front of his committee. I would prefer because of some of the sensitivity of the national security implications involved in all of this that he started there," Thune said.

    Pressed if he thought the administration should hand over the complaint, he added that they should "proceed with caution."

    "I would hope that whatever information is available that is in possession of the inspector general, of the DNI that we would get access to that," he said.
     
    My Moria Moon

    My Moria Moon

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    This is a double edged sword in the Democrats hands. It could cut Biden off the race. They will need first to verify the content of the recordings. If these reveals that Trump did indeed exercise blackmail against Ukraine to get them to discredit Biden, Trump's impeachment may then be worth it for the democrats to bring his political end.

    If the blackmail attempt evidence in those tapes is unclear, they could lose Biden and rather increase Trump's chance for re-election. It all boils down to the content of the tapes.
     
    My Moria Moon

    My Moria Moon

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    See LVV, I gave you an opinion about the topic you just created without participating in the poll. Polls are not mandatory for every topic, you see.
    Else, what do you think:
    1- I am right
    2- I was wrong all the time in the past
    3- We can agree on something
    4- The temp in Kazakistan does not affect the crops in Ukraine
    -
    -
    -
    -

    :)
     
    NiceV

    NiceV

    Well-Known Member
    See LVV, I gave you an opinion about the topic you just created without participating in the poll. Polls are not mandatory for every topic, you see.
    Else, what do you think:
    1- I am right
    2- I was wrong all the time in the past
    3- We can agree on something
    4- The temp in Kazakistan does not affect the crops in Ukraine
    -
    -
    -
    -

    :)
    So give me s better poll
    []
     
    Last edited by a moderator:
    My Moria Moon

    My Moria Moon

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    So give me s better poll
    Why do you always need one? Isn't the topic in itself enough discussion subject?
    OK, yes polls for everything, if you insist. At least make them public to increase the curiosity magnitude. People on a forum often want to know who chose what. For no specific reason, only heik, they're 7eshriyeh by nature those people, 3ajabak?
    Anyways, either public polls or no polls, this is my friendly advice to you.

    As for the multiple choices, you have two choices:
    1- either you make them few, short and relevant
    2- or a lot many, complex and extremely irrelevant, for the fun of it
     
    NiceV

    NiceV

    Well-Known Member
    Why do you always need one? Isn't the topic in itself enough discussion subject?
    OK, yes polls for everything, if you insist. At least make them public to increase the curiosity magnitude. People on a forum often want to know who chose what. For no specific reason, only heik, they're 7eshriyeh by nature those people, 3ajabak?
    Anyways, either public polls or no polls, this is my friendly advice to you.

    As for the multiple choices, you have two choices:
    1- either you make them few, short and relevant
    2- or a lot many, complex and extremely irrelevant, for the fun of it
    How public
    Meaning people will choose and discuss
     
    NiceV

    NiceV

    Well-Known Member
    mber 25, 2019 - 11:00 AM EDT
    Trump's Ukraine transcript: Unwise words but no proof of a crime

    Trump's Ukraine transcript: Unwise words but no proof of a crime
    BY JONATHAN TURLEY, OPINION CONTRIBUTOR 0
    The views expressed by contributors are their own and not the view of The Hill
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    The transcript of President Donald Trump’s call to Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky is enough to make Edwin Edwards, the infamous Louisiana governor, blush. Edwards once bragged, "The only way I can lose this election is if I'm caught in bed with either a dead girl or live boy.”

    Even after the July 24 appearance of Robert Mueller before Congress to discuss his findings as special counsel, Trump felt no qualms about calling President Zelensky the following day to push him to investigate Trump’s main political opponent, Joe Biden, and Biden’s son, Hunter. It is breathtaking to read Trump trying to convince Zelensky to do him a “favor” by going after the Bidens and suggesting meetings with Attorney General Bill Barr and Trump’s personal counsel, Rudy Giuliani.

    Yet, for those hoping to find a dead promise or a live Russian in the transcript, they will be disappointed yet again. The transcript lacks a critical element needed for impeachment: evidence of a quid pro quo. Trump never connects the investigation with the receipt of roughly $400 million in military aid. While he discusses the aid, he never suggests that he will not send it. That does not mean a case -- for impeachment or criminal prosecution -- cannot be made. Unlike myriad prior impeachable offenses suggested by Democratic members, this allegation of self-dealing could be both an impeachable offense and a crime, though neither would be easy to prove.

    Past suggested impeachable offenses either have been facially ridiculous (like Trump’s Charlottesville comments, or his criticism of National Football League protest-kneelers) or legally flawed (like the Russian intervention or obstruction theories). The closest viable claim was Trump’s payments to alleged former mistresses, which were included in the criminal plea of Trump’s former personal lawyer, Michael Cohen.

    This is different. If a quid pro quo was proven, it would be self-dealing and an abuse of public office, and that can be a crime. Just ask disgraced former Illinois Governor Rod Blagojevich. He was convicted after calling other political figures to leverage the appointment of a new U.S. senator, to replace then-newly elected President Barack Obama, for Blagojevich’s own political gain. While some of us were highly critical of that prosecution, because politicians routinely use such decisions to their own benefit, Blagojevich was convicted and his conviction was later upheld.

    Yet, such cases have a mixed record. Former Virginia Governor Robert McDonnell was convicted of using his public office to benefit a businessman who gave McDonnell and his wife various gifts. I was critical of that prosecution, too, and ultimately it was overturned by the Supreme Court. Then there was the prosecution of Senator Robert Menendez, who helped a wealthy doctor and donor with various government problems; the doctor-donor spent lavishly on Menendez, in turn. Menendez actually did pressure officials in cases benefiting the doctor, and helped him to secure visas, yet the senator was acquitted.

    So what would Congress need to establish a strong case in light of this transcript? Some have argued that it does not matter if Trump never raised the military funding as leverage with Zelensky -- but it does. There is nothing illegal in a president complaining about the lack of an investigation into corruption, even by a political opponent. The transcript does not show Trump demanding a political charge but an investigation.

    And the transcript has material that will help Trump, who has maintained that he held back the aid to try to get other countries to pony up in support of Ukraine. In the phone call, Trump tells Zelensky that “we spend a lot of effort and a lot of time. Much more than the European countries are doing and they should be helping you more than they are.” He speaks at length about the need for those countries to contribute, and Zelensky agrees.

    Moreover, Trump first asks for access to a computer “server” and references Crowdstrike, a cybersecurity company related to the Russian hacking investigation. Former FBI director James Comey made direct reference to Crowdstrike as one of the key elements in the investigation, and that investigation is being reviewed by U.S. Attorney John Durham. A server and other information connected to the Russian hacking evidence would likely assist the Durham investigation. The transcript’s references to Attorney General Barr could be defended, in part, on that basis.

    The quid may still be out there -- but it will not be found in this transcript. The most obvious place to look is with witnesses who may have heard Trump make the linkage. The most intriguing of those possibilities would be John Bolton, the national security adviser who Trump recently fired and then maligned. Bolton reportedly was irate over the freezing of Ukraine’s military aid, and he could have the knowledge and motivation to supply information. It also is reasonable for Congress to say that, with a half-billion dollars on the table, it is hardly necessary to state the connection. Yet, presidents often have such leverage over countries.

    The references to AG Barr can be defended but still are a matter of legitimate concern for Congress. Trump repeatedly says he will have Giuliani and Barr call Zelensky, and Zelensky says a new prosecutor is already set to look into the matter. Yet the problem for potential prosecution is that, again, nothing came from those referrals. The Ukrainians never contacted Barr, and Barr never had anything to do with the Biden controversy. Barr was unaware of the call and of Trump’s references to him.

    Trump is a recidivist in the “law of attempt.” He often proposes ridiculous actions, like firing a special counsel, but what follows is … nothing. Advisers like Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and AG Barr have become masters of listening to his tirades and then going about their business. The chances that Barr would work with Ukrainians to hunt down the Bidens is about as likely as -- well, as Trump’s suggestion earlier this week that he would be a shoo-in for the Nobel Peace Prize “for a lot of things” if the system was not rigged against him.

    As shown by McDonnell and Menendez, these types of cases are difficult to prove, even when actions are taken. This would be an attempt to perform an act that is itself a controversial basis for a criminal charge: Zelensky says the Ukrainians were already looking at all such matters, and Barr was never told -- let alone enlisted -- to help. It would be like the McDonnell case in which the Supreme Court rejected the notion that the governor took “official acts” in calling Virginia officials on behalf of the business ... except, in this instance, the calls to Barr never took place.

    Absent a clear quid pro quo, a Senate impeachment trial could be a grotesque scene. The Trump team would point out that President Obama’s administration directly used a secret court to investigate his political opponents on claims that were based, in part, on opposition research paid for by the Clinton campaign. Moreover, the trial would highlight the highly dubious money given to Hunter Biden by Chinese and Ukrainian interests while his father negotiated major financial and political agreements with those countries.

    While many in the media have chosen to focus on the narrow question of whether Joe Biden pressured Ukraine to fire its anti-corruption prosecutor to protect his son, there is a secondary, more important question: whether the Biden family profiteered during his term as vice president. Few people believe the Chinese and Ukrainians searched the world for a financial or energy genius and came up with Hunter Biden. He just happened to be the son of the vice president, who dramatically reminded the Ukrainians that he would decide on whether they received over a billion dollars in loans and support. Hunter Biden has contradicted his father’s denial that he had no knowledge of and never spoke to his son about his Ukraine dealings. That would be a painful Senate trial, culminated by the scene of Menendez voting as one of the jurors.

    Despite concerted efforts of critics to downplay the underlying allegations, the Biden affair would be relevant to the merits of such a trial. If Trump simply picked up the phone and asked a foreign leader to investigate Elizabeth Warren without any outstanding allegation of corruption, it would be impossible to defend. The problem here is that the Biden contracts do appear to be, well, corrupt -- precisely the type of corruption Biden lambasted when he bragged about getting the Ukrainian prosecutor fired.

    If one agrees that Hunter Biden’s windfall contracts were obvious influence-peddling, Trump’s push for an investigation into that possible crime becomes more defensible. It does not, however, make it right. Trump clearly tripped another wire for possible impeachment, immediately after the special counsel made his final report on prior controversies. Congress is clearly justified in investigating, and the transcript is not the entirety of the evidence that might show a corrupt intent or act. All of which is why House Democrats still need to find the quid.
     
    NiceV

    NiceV

    Well-Known Member
    September 25, 2019 - 10:03 AM EDT
    White House memo shows Trump pressed Ukraine leader to look into Biden

    BY MORGAN CHALFANT AND BRETT SAMUELS 2,906
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    President Trump asked Ukrainian President Volodmyr Zelensky to work with his personal attorney, Rudy Giuliani, and expressed hope that he “can look into” former Vice President Joe Biden’s role in the firing of a Ukrainian prosecutor, according to a five-page partial transcript of a call between the two leaders released by the White House on Wednesday.

    “There's a lot of talk about Biden's son, that Biden stopped the prosecution and a lot of people want to find out about that so whatever you can do with the Attorney General would be great," Trump tells Zelensky in the July 25 call.

    "Biden went around bragging that he stopped the prosecution so if you ·can look into it ... It sounds horrible to me,” Trump says.

    The Ukrainian president assures Trump that he would be installing his own prosecutor and officials and said he “will look into the situation, specifically to the company that you mentioned in this issue.”

    It’s unclear if he was referring to Joe Biden or Crowdstrike, a company with ties to the Russia investigation that Trump raised earlier in the call.

    Biden’s name is mentioned three times on the call and Giuliani’s name comes up five times, according to the document, which is titled formally as a “memorandum of telephone conversation.” The document makes clear it is not a verbatim transcript of the conversation.

    The White House released the transcript a day after House Democrats formally launched an impeachment inquiry against the president that was triggered by his dealings with Ukraine.

    The president had vowed to release a transcript of the conversation and said it would make clear that he did nothing wrong, but the pages released by the White House seemed likely to give some arguments to Democrats.

    Rep. Val Demings (D-Fla.), a Judiciary Committee member, tweeted shortly after the memo’s release that "nearly every line describes a shocking abuse of power.”

    The transcript is likely to further fuel calls for impeachment, given Trump clearly requests a probe into his political rival.

    Many Democrats have argued that Trump raising an investigation of a political rival on a call with a foreign leader is sufficient proof of wrongdoing, even if there was no explicit quid pro quo.

    The Justice Department released a statement shortly after the White House released the transcript, saying that Attorney General William Barr, who is also mentioned on the call, was first notified of Trump’s conversation with Zelensky “several weeks” after it took place.

    Justice said it learned of a potential referral to the intelligence community inspector general after the call, and that Trump has not spoken to Barr about having Ukraine investigate “anything related” to Biden or his son.

    Trump told Zelensky on the call that he would have Barr talk to him.

    “I will. have Mr. Giuliani give you a call and I am. Also going to have Attorney General Barr call and we will get to the bottom of it. I'm sure you will figure it out,” Trump says.

    Democrats are concerned that Trump pressured a foreign government to look into a political opponent, and that he may have used U.S. military aide as leverage.

    While Trump highlights how the U.S. provides aid to Ukraine and expresses frustration that France and Germany don’t contribute more, the transcript does not contain any explicit quid pro quo in which Trump ties aid for Ukraine to opening an investigation into the Bidens.

    The president and his allies are likely to seize on that and argue Trump was merely pushing Ukraine to focus on corruption.

    Rep. Doug Collins (R-Ga.), the top Republican on the Judiciary Committee, claimed the transcript showed Democrats had “leapt to conclusions” before examining the facts, citing the lack of evidence of a quid pro quo in the transcript.

    “There was no quid pro quo and nothing to justify the clamor House Democrats caused yesterday. The real danger here is that Democrats keep using baseless accusations in hopes of crippling a successful presidency,” Collins said.

    The transcript release is unlikely to satisfy Democrats and some Republicans who have called for access to the full whistleblower complaint filed in August that raised concerns about Trump’s interactions with Ukraine. Lawmakers have yet to see that complaint, but the White House is expected to turn it over this week.

    The call begins with Trump congratulating Zelensky on his election victory earlier in the year.

    Zelensky speaks flatteringly of Trump on the call. He tells the president that he hopes to “drain the swamp,” a reference to Trump’s own 2016 mantra, and complains that former U.S. Ambassador to Ukraine Marie Yovanovitch, who was recalled in May, supported the previous president.

    “It was great that you were the first one. who told me that she was a bad ambassador because I agree with you 100 percent,” Zelensky said.

    Trump and his allies have latched onto Biden’s connection to Ukraine as the former vice president seeks the Democratic nomination to challenge Trump in 2020.

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    Hunter Biden worked on the board of a natural gas company owned by a Ukrainian oligarch while his father served as vice president. Joe Biden pushed in 2016 for the dismissal of a Ukrainian prosecutor who had been accused of overlooking corruption in his own office, threatening to withhold money if the prosecutor was not fired.

    There’s no indication Joe Biden was acting with his son’s interests in mind and the former vice president has denied doing so. But Trump and his allies, including Giuliani, have pushed for an investigation into the Bidens in Ukraine and decried the former vice president as “corrupt.”
     
    NiceV

    NiceV

    Well-Known Member
    September 25, 2019 - 11:55 AM EDT
    House GOP leader says Pelosi should step down as Speaker

    House GOP leader says Pelosi should step down as Speaker
    BY JULIEGRACE BRUFKE
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    House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.) blasted Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s (D-Calif.) decision to launch an impeachment inquiry, calling it a “dark day” for the rule of law.

    He also said Pelosi should step down as Speaker.

    “I think what the Speaker did was a dark day, not only for this institution, but for the rule of law. And she put this country in harm's way when it comes to national security and our view around the world,” he told reporters Wednesday.

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    McCarthy said it was wrong for Pelosi to launch an impeachment inquiry as Trump met with foreign leaders at the United Nations.

    “At the exact same time, the leader of our country is sitting in the UN (United Nations), meeting with other world leaders — a challenge with Iran, a challenge with China and others — and she stands before that she's going to do a press conference all day long to say what's going to happen with impeachment, and she claims he violated law with no proof, with no information, simply the fact that she does not like the outcome of the election,” he said. “That questions her ability to even be Speaker in my eyes.”

    Pelosi backed the impeachment inquiry Tuesday as revelations unfolded about President Trump’s dealings with Ukraine.

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    Trump pressed Ukraine’s president to investigate former Vice President Joe Biden for his calls during the Obama administration for a prosecutor in Ukraine to be fired for corruption.

    Democrats argue Trump was seeking to use a foreign leader to interfere in the U.S. political process given Biden’s standing as a top Democratic presidential nominee, and they also suspect he used the leverage of U.S. military aid to pressure Ukraine.

    Trump says he did nothing wrong, and that Democrats are making a big political mistake with their impeachment push.

    Pelosi had resisted impeachment since almost the beginning of Trump’s presidency, but reversed course in dramatic fashion on Wednesday.

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    McCarthy, one of Trump’s closest allies in the House, blasted her for allowing House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff (D-Calif.) to remain in his position following the Mueller report and not condemning former Vice President Joe Biden for his interactions with Ukraine.

    “At the end of the day the Speaker owes an apology to this nation and I think it’s even a question if she should stay in her job,” he said.
     
    NiceV

    NiceV

    Well-Known Member
    Go crush these low atheists democrats O mighty Crusader in Chief
     
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