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Whisteblower Ukraine : Trump Impeachment’s or Biden Corruption in Ukraine

Should

  • Trump will be impeached by House

    Votes: 5 71.4%
  • Trump will resign

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Trump will not resign and will be supported by Senate

    Votes: 3 42.9%
  • Biden campaign is over because of his son corruption in Ukraine

    Votes: 2 28.6%
  • Biden will not be affected

    Votes: 2 28.6%

  • Total voters
    7
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  • proIsrael-nonIsraeli

    proIsrael-nonIsraeli

    Legendary Member
    Read up - you might better understand why impeachment is dead on arrival.

    "WAYNE ALLYN ROOT: Comparing Trump to 16 Years of Obama/Bush"

    "No wonder both Democrats and the GOP establishment despise Trump."

     
    Thawra # Furoshima

    Thawra # Furoshima

    Well-Known Member
    Read up - you might better understand why impeachment is dead on arrival.

    "WAYNE ALLYN ROOT: Comparing Trump to 16 Years of Obama/Bush"

    "No wonder both Democrats and the GOP establishment despise Trump."

    Smart guy
    25, 2019 - 12:33 PM EDTKanye West says supporting Trump is 'God's practical joke to all liberals'
    Kanye West says supporting Trump is 'God's practical joke to all liberals'
    BY ALICIA COHN TWEET SHARE MORE
    Kanye West says God is "hilarious" and his own support for President Trump is "God's practical joke on all liberals," while also claiming he will be president one day.
    "This shows you that God is hilarious. ... God has got a sense of humor. Liberals love art, right, and now, I am unquestionably, undoubtedly the greatest human artist of all time. It's just not even a question anymore at this point. It's just a fact, right?" West told Apple Music's Zane Lowe on Beats 1 in an interview released Thursday.
    "So, for the greatest artist in human existence to put a red hat on was God's practical joke on all liberals like, 'Nooooo not Kanye,'" he continued. He used himself as an example of someone saying something that "culturally they're not supposed to say."
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    West during the two-hour Apple interview also claimed "there will be a time when I will be the president of the U.S.," without elaborating, according to Newsweek.
    West took heat over the past two years for his support of Trump, which included an Oval Office meeting with the president last October. West has defended his right to wear the red "Make America Great Again" hat representing Trump's campaign, claiming that he was criticized for it backstage during a September 2018 appearance on "Saturday Night Live."
    He told David Letterman in a May episode of his Netflix show that "liberals bully people who are Trump supporters." He also shared texts from fellow artist John Legend criticizing his pro-Trump stance.
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    During the Apple interview, West said the fans disappointed by his support for Trump are being fed on "propaganda."
    "We've been herded into an idea of blue or red; right; left," he said.
    West plans to release his new album "Jesus is King" on Friday.
     
    Thawra # Furoshima

    Thawra # Furoshima

    Well-Known Member
    ctober 28, 2019 - 09:42 PM EDTTop Republicans say impeachment resolution is too little too late
    Top Republicans say impeachment resolution is too little too late
    BY JULIEGRACE BRUFKE0TWEET SHARE MORE
    Top Republicans in the House said Monday that Democratic leadership's decision to bring a resolutionon impeachment procedures to the floor on Thursday is too little too late.
    Since Democrats announced their plans to move forward with a formal impeachment inquiry five weeks ago, Republicans have hammered their colleagues across the aisle on procedure, arguing the process Democrats have conducted lacks transparency and is illegitimate since the full House did not authorize the inquiry in a floor vote.

    The news of the upcoming resolution, however, did little to appease them.
    House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.) said Monday the resolution “proves everything we were saying was correct,” telling reporters that Pelosi should have launched the impeachment process with a vote and answered the questions he laid out in a letter on the rules of the probe earlier in the process. McCarthy argued that Republicans had been denied fair proceedings for weeks.
    “Did you ever get to cross-examine? Did you get to have a witness, to bring a witness in?” he said, adding he doesn’t believe House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff (D-Calif.) should be leading the investigation. He said the new measure "now proves that they were wrong from the start."
    Minority Whip Steve Scalise (R-La.) said he doesn’t believe the measure will help bring transparency to the process as House Rules Committee Chairman Jim McGovern (D-Mass.) — who is slated to introduce the measure on Tuesday — said it is intended to do, blasting Democrats for opting to hold the hearings behind closed doors and only allowing members of the House Foreign Affairs Committee, House Intelligence Committee and House Oversight and Reform Committee attend the depositions.
    “From what we're hearing, it sounds like all they're trying to do is codify the Soviet-style impeachment process that they've been running,” he said, “where they don't let both sides called witnesses, it's all Adam Schiff's personal show to try to build a case of innuendo because they don't have any real facts.”
    Rep. Matt Gaetz (R-Fla.) — a member of the House Judiciary Committee who led a group of Republicans to storm the sensitive compartmented information facility (SCIF) last week in protest of the closed-door hearings — said he believes the decision to bring a measure to the floor is a direct result of Republicans calls to open up the process.
    “I think that Nancy Pelosi is not someone who usually calls audibles, and the fact that she's calling an audible here adopting as her message for the week something that she referred to just weeks ago as a Republican talking point indicates that they were feeling the heat,” he told The Hill.
    Rep. Lee Zeldin (R-N.Y.) said he still needs to see the text of the resolution Democrats plan to put forward, but said he feels the vote is long overdue.
    "We'll see what the resolution looks like, as I've been saying this entire time with regards to the ability for the minority party to call witnesses, to have an equal allocation of staffing, for all of the transcripts to be released to not just members of Congress but to the American public,“ he said.
    “For the president to be able to have council president to cross-examine witnesses, present evidence, exert executive privilege when appropriate, and more — there's a lot that I have been talking about this entire process that should have been corrected a few weeks ago.”
    Zeldin, a member of the Foreign Affairs Committee, said he’s frustrated that the current rules prevent members in attendance at the hearings from talking about the substance from witnesses' testimonies, alleging Schiff is selectively leaking and breaking his own rules by talking about the testimonies on television.
    “One of the concerns that I have with the cherry-picked leaks and withholding of key information is that I am abiding by these rules, I am told that if I don't abide by the rules it's a violation of House rules and an ethics complaint can be filed," he said, "and the people who are lecturing me about what the rules are and what the consequences are then go on to a Sunday morning news show and then leak the substance of information.”

    In a letter sent to members of her caucus on Monday, Pelosi said while she does not believe they need to hold a vote to legitimize the impeachment inquiry, it could help provide them with leverage as the White House attempts to stonewall the inquiry.
    “This resolution establishes the procedure for hearings that are open to the American people, authorizes the disclosure of deposition transcripts, outlines procedures to transfer evidence to the Judiciary Committee as it considers potential articles of impeachment, and sets forth due process rights for the President and his Counsel,” she wrote.
    We are taking this step to eliminate any doubt as to whether the Trump Administration may withhold documents, prevent witness testimony, disregard duly authorized subpoenas, or continue obstructing the House of Representatives.”
     
    Thawra # Furoshima

    Thawra # Furoshima

    Well-Known Member
    The New York Times
    Paula White, Trump’s Personal Pastor, Joins the White House
    Jeremy W. Peters and Maggie Haberman 23 hrs ago
    Donald Trump et al. standing next to a glass of wine: Paula White, President Trump’s personal pastor, during a prayer at an evangelical leadership dinner at the White House last year.
    © Doug Mills/The New York Times
    Paula White, President Trump’s personal pastor, during a prayer at an evangelical leadership dinner at the White House last year.
    Paula White, a televangelist based in Florida and personal pastor to President Trump whom he has known since 2002, has joined the Trump administration in an official capacity, according to a White House official.

    Ms. White will work in the Office of Public Liaison, the official said, which is the division of the White House overseeing outreach to groups and coalitions organizing key parts of the president’s base. Her role will be to advise the administration’s Faith and Opportunity Initiative, which Mr. Trump established last year by executive order and which aims to give religious groups more of a voice in government programs devoted to issues like defending religious liberty and fighting poverty.

    As Mr. Trump campaigns for a second term, he cannot afford to lose support from the religious conservatives who voted for him in 2016 in significant numbers. Without their backing, his path to re-election would be significantly narrower.

    He has taken repeated steps to ensure they turn out for him again — by issuing executive orders, making cabinet appointments and nominating federal judges that pass muster with the religious right. On a range of issues from abortion rights to tax exemptions for churches, Mr. Trump has tried to grant Christian conservatives their policy wish lists whenever legally and politically feasible.

    But Ms. White cannot be easily categorized as either a political asset or a liability. She has a large following among Christians who believe in the “prosperity gospel,” which teaches that God blesses people he deems to be of strong faith with wealth, good health and other gifts.

    But many other Christians consider these beliefs to be heresy. And Ms. White’s presence in the top tier of Mr. Trump’s coterie of informal religious advisers has long been a source of contention with many evangelical Christians.

    Despite this controversy, Ms. White has remained in good standing with Mr. Trump, who invited her to deliver an invocation at his inauguration and has hosted her as a guest at the White House numerous times. In a recent interview with The New York Post to promote her new book, she said she sometimes visits the White House several times a week.

    In the interview, she spoke admiringly of the president’s intellect. “He’s in total control,” she told The Post. “He’s not at all impulsive — he’s so far ahead of everyone, very much a strategic thinker.”
     
    Thawra # Furoshima

    Thawra # Furoshima

    Well-Known Member
    November 03, 2019 - 10:00 AM EST
    Partisan impeachment process will harm Democrats in critical districts

    Partisan impeachment process will harm Democrats in critical districts
    BY DOUGLAS SCHOEN, OPINION CONTRIBUTOR 0
    The views expressed by contributors are their own and not the view of The Hill
    TWEET SHARE MORE
    On Thursday, the House of Representatives voted to formalize the Democratic-led impeachment inquiry and begin the critical public phase of the investigation. The final vote was 232 to 196 — every Republican representative voted no, and only two Democrats defected from the majority.

    As the impeachment process enters its public phase, Democrats must be mindful of the long-term implications of an apparently partisan inquiry. Undeniably, the media cycle will be dominated by impeachment for months to come and it will invariably distract from any Democratic legislative priorities and accomplishments — importantly, the legislative promises that Democratic congressional candidates ran on in 2018.

    “We could investigate the issues that we’re really concerned about without going further down the impeachment road,” said Jeff Van Drew of New Jersey, one of the Democrats who voted no. “We’ll have the same president and presidential candidate who will be able to say he is exonerated. So, I don’t know how much we really gain from that.”

    To be sure, House Democrats have more to lose than to gain from an impeachment process that appears to be tainted by partisanship. Aside from the potential implications for the presidential election, Democrats need to pay particular attention to defending the 41 House seats that they picked up in 2018, many of which were in swing districts. Just one year has passed since the Democrats took back the House — not much time has passed, and not much work has been done.

    Democrats cannot and should not take their control of the House for granted. Given that several Republicans who lost by narrow margins in 2018, such as Young Kim in California’s 39th district and Maria Salazar in Florida’s 27th district, have already declared their candidacy for 2020, House Democrats must be mindful of how this apparently partisan impeachment inquiry will resonate with these voters.

    As House Democrats move full speed ahead with their impeachment inquiry, it is essential that the party remains mindful of the promises and policies that they campaigned on in 2018, such as creating an economy that works for everyone, gun control, and health care reform. With that said, as new evidence comes to light, it is clear that President Trump abused the power of his office for personal and political gain, and it is clear why House Democrats decided to press forward with impeachment proceedings.

    “The genius of the Constitution, a separation of powers: three co-equal branches of government to be a check and balance on each other,” House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said during the vote on Thursday, reverting to a constitutional argument as a basis for opening the inquiry. While there is a sound constitutional argument to be made here, there is a level of political practicality that simply cannot be ignored in today’s deeply polarized political climate.

    Whether House Democrats will acknowledge it or not, this impeachment inquiry is fundamentally partisan. The Republicans did not break ranks in the initial vote, nor are they likely to as the inquiry progresses, and Democratic leaders must seriously consider how this will resonate with independent and swing-state voters. Indeed, the country is sharply divided along partisan lines over whether President Trump should be impeached and removed from office.

    According to a Washington Post-ABC News poll released in October, 49 percent of Americans say the president should be impeached and removed from office, while 47 percent say he should not. Among Democrats, support for removing the president from office is nearly universal, with 82 percent in favor and 13 percent opposed. Among Republicans, it is almost the reverse, with 82 percent opposed and 18 percent in favor.

    Moreover, even if the Democrats successfully impeach President Trump in the House, there is no sign that any Republicans in the Senate will vote to convict the president. Further, if Trump is impeached but not convicted, the Republican base will be emboldened and increasingly formidable, which will present serious challenges for whichever Democratic candidate that ends up taking him on in the general election.

    In order for Democrats to build off of their political success from one year ago, they need to continue to communicate on issues that the American people will consider when they go to the ballot box, like how they are working to build an economy that works for everyone, achieving affordable healthcare, and fixing the broken immigration system. If the 2020 election becomes a polarized battle over impeachment, Democrats may very well lose their gains from 2018, and, for the second election in a row, the White House.
     
    Thawra # Furoshima

    Thawra # Furoshima

    Well-Known Member
    Poll: Trump trails Biden, leads Warren in key states

    Poll: Trump trails Biden, leads Warren in key states
    BY JULIA MANCHESTER
    TWEET SHARE MORE
    President Trump is trailing former Vice President Joe Biden and leading Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) in key battleground states, according to a New York Times/Siena College survey released on Monday.

    The poll shows Biden leading Trump by 5 points in Arizona, 3 points in Pennsylvania and Wisconsin, and by 2 points in Florida, margins all near or within the poll's margin of error.

    The president and former vice president are also neck and neck in Michigan, according to the survey.

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    Trump led Biden by 2 points in North Carolina, however, which has become more competitive for Democrats in recent years.

    Trump won all six of the battleground states in 2016.

    Pollsters also found that the president leads Warren by 6 points in Michigan, by 4 points in Florida, and by 3 points in North Carolina.

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    The two are even in Pennsylvania and Wisconsin, and Warren edges Trump by 2 points in Arizona.

    Another progressive 2020 White House hopeful, Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.), leads Trump by 2 points in Michigan and Wisconsin, and by 1 point in Pennsylvania. Trump tops Sanders in Florida, Arizona, and North Carolina.

    The poll can be seen as a warning for Democrats ahead of the 2020 presidential election, illustrating Trump's competitiveness in key battleground states.

    The results could also be used to back up Biden's argument that he stands the best chance of defeating Trump in 2020. The Biden campaign has repeatedly touted the former vice president's electability against the president as Warren has risen in a number of state and national-level polls.

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    "We have got to beat this man. It’s not enough that we just beat him. We’ve got to beat him soundly so everyone knows we are not going back to a time when another president like him can hold that office,” Biden said in Iowa last Friday. “And I will beat him like a drum if I’m your nominee, and he knows it.”

    The New York Times/Siena College poll was conducted from Oct. 13-26 among 3,766 registered voters. The margin error in each state poll is 4.4 percentage points.
     
    proIsrael-nonIsraeli

    proIsrael-nonIsraeli

    Legendary Member
    Poll: Trump trails Biden, leads Warren in key states

    Poll: Trump trails Biden, leads Warren in key states
    BY JULIA MANCHESTER
    TWEET SHARE MORE
    President Trump is trailing former Vice President Joe Biden and leading Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) in key battleground states, according to a New York Times/Siena College survey released on Monday.

    The poll shows Biden leading Trump by 5 points in Arizona, 3 points in Pennsylvania and Wisconsin, and by 2 points in Florida, margins all near or within the poll's margin of error.

    The president and former vice president are also neck and neck in Michigan, according to the survey.

    ADVERTISEMENT
    Trump led Biden by 2 points in North Carolina, however, which has become more competitive for Democrats in recent years.

    Trump won all six of the battleground states in 2016.

    Pollsters also found that the president leads Warren by 6 points in Michigan, by 4 points in Florida, and by 3 points in North Carolina.

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    The two are even in Pennsylvania and Wisconsin, and Warren edges Trump by 2 points in Arizona.

    Another progressive 2020 White House hopeful, Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.), leads Trump by 2 points in Michigan and Wisconsin, and by 1 point in Pennsylvania. Trump tops Sanders in Florida, Arizona, and North Carolina.

    The poll can be seen as a warning for Democrats ahead of the 2020 presidential election, illustrating Trump's competitiveness in key battleground states.

    The results could also be used to back up Biden's argument that he stands the best chance of defeating Trump in 2020. The Biden campaign has repeatedly touted the former vice president's electability against the president as Warren has risen in a number of state and national-level polls.

    ADVERTISEMENT
    "We have got to beat this man. It’s not enough that we just beat him. We’ve got to beat him soundly so everyone knows we are not going back to a time when another president like him can hold that office,” Biden said in Iowa last Friday. “And I will beat him like a drum if I’m your nominee, and he knows it.”

    The New York Times/Siena College poll was conducted from Oct. 13-26 among 3,766 registered voters. The margin error in each state poll is 4.4 percentage points.

    My version of perfect Democrats head-scratcher:

    #1: Trump leads Warren
    #2: Warren leads Biden
    #3: Biden leads Trump

    And the irony of it is that such situation with polls is completely possible.
     
    Thawra # Furoshima

    Thawra # Furoshima

    Well-Known Member
    Coucou
    تظاهرة مرتقبة أمام منزل جنبلاط... كيف علّق "الاشتراكي"؟














    2019 - تشرين الثاني - 07


    أعلن الحزب التقدمي الإشتراكي في بيان، أنه "عطفاً على ما تناقلته بعض وسائل التواصل الإجتماعي عن تجمع من المزمع إقامته الجمعة أمام منزل رئيس الحزب التقدمي الإشتراكي وليد جنبلاط في كليمنصو، يدعو الحزب جميع أعضائه ومناصريه إلتزام الهدوء التام وإحترام حرية التعبير عن الرأي التي لطالما كانت من الثوابت التي يدافع عنها في نضاله ومسيرته".
     
    proIsrael-nonIsraeli

    proIsrael-nonIsraeli

    Legendary Member
    How are you
    So open trial will finish by February
    Elections soon
    Primaries
    I am fine and I made a point not to follow impeachment process until it will get to Senate (if it will get to Senate).
     
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