Word of the Day

Picasso

Picasso

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Aesthetic (adjective)

Pronunciation: [es-'thet-ik or es-'tet-ik]

Definition: Relating to the perception of beauty or symmetry; pleasing in appearance.

Usage: "Close your eyes, and think of someone you physically admire." This lyric from ex-Smiths frontman Morrissey describes perfectly the ideal of the aesthetic—something that, in your mind's eye, is beautiful. The aesthetic properties of an object are in good taste and proportion, such as Michelangelo's statue of David, whereas a potato, lumpy and brown, would rarely be described as aesthetically pleasing. Furthermore, as much as she thinks so, grandma's Christmas tree might not be so aesthetically pleasing either.

Suggested Usage: Aesthetic usually refers to accepted notions of beauty and symmetry, and is most often used to describe a piece of art or architecture. That which possesses "aesthetic value" is visually pleasing: while some might find beauty in a broken down old Volkswagen Rabbit, the machine in that state would not generally be considered to possess aesthetic value. Aesthetic can roughly be equated with the sense of what is beautiful.

Etymology: Interestingly enough, the Romantic poet Samuel Taylor Coleridge introduced the word aesthetic into the English language (along with such common terms as "selfless), and appreciation of aesthetic principles soon became a rallying point for Romantic period artists. The English version was probably derived from the German ؤsthetik or the French esthétique, each an appropriation of the Greek for "I feel."
 
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  • Frisbeetarian

    Frisbeetarian

    Legendary Member
    Cornhole

    (O) <--- That right there.

    I ate a can of corn, waited a day and put my cornhole over the toilet and corn and cornlogs came out.
     
    Danny Z

    Danny Z

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    lu·pine

    –adjective
    1.
    pertaining to or resembling the wolf.
    2.
    related to the wolf.
    3.
    savage; ravenous; predatory.
     
    Shev

    Shev

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    Omnipotent:

    om·nip·o·tent

    /ɒmˈnɪpətənt/ [om-nip-uh-tuhnt]
    –adjective
    1.
    almighty or infinite in power, as God.
    2.
    having very great or unlimited authority or power.
    –noun
    3.
    an omnipotent being.
    4.
    the Omnipotent, God.
     
    Picasso

    Picasso

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    Myself (pronoun)

    Pronunciation: [mI-'self]

    Definition: "Myself" is from a family of words called 'reflexive pronouns,' formed by combining the possessive pronouns like "my," "your," "her," and the reflexive "-self." Oddly, the 3rd person masculine "himself" and plural "themselves" do not use the possessive "his" or "their," which explains why some dialects correct this inconsistency by (mis)using "hisself" and "theirselves."

    Usage: Increasingly, speakers in the US are using "myself" to bail out of the "I or me?" trap: "Imelda and myself went shopping for sparkly red shoes." Incorrect. The only time to use a reflexive pronoun is when a noun or pronoun in subject position identifies the "-self." "Imelda went to shop for herself," is correct, where "herself" refers back to "Imelda." So is "I would have gone, she didn't have to go herself." In English the reflexive pronoun tends to go at the end of the sentence.

    Suggested Usage: The ultimate solution to the "I or me?" trap is to drop everything before the word in question to figure out what you want to say. In "Imelda and myself went shopping," think "____ went shopping." Now the problem is easy to solve. "I went shopping," so "Imelda and I went shopping" is the way to go. "No one saw Imelda and me shopping" is correct for the same reason.

    Etymology: The reflexive pronoun in English is used to show action reflecting on the subject, so it can never be the subject of a sentence itself. You can, however, also use these forms as emphatic pronouns, for which the 'no-subject' rule does not apply. "I didn't actually see Bill himself," simply emphasizes "Bill." This emphatic use also shows up in the subject, as "He himself doesn't eat caviar but he serves it at parties;" in fact, sometimes it appears, sarcastically, alone in this function: "Well! Herself seems to have eaten all the caviar!"
     
    Picasso

    Picasso

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    Etcetera (noun)

    Pronunciation: [et-'se-t�-r�]

    Definition: And others of a similar kind.

    Usage: Today's word is a bit more focused than such native expressions as "so forth," "so on," and "among others;" it refers only to others of the same class. English also uses Latin et alii, abbreviated as et al. "and others" to refer to coauthors, such as "Anderson et al.," meaning that Anderson was one of several authors. Today's word is also a countable noun that means, in the plural (etceteras), "miscellaneous extra things or persons."

    Suggested Usage: There is no need to string several etceteras on the end of a sentence even though you might be tempted, "Sheila has a million reasons for not cooking: the stove doesn't work, the ingredients are old, the restaurants are cheap, etc." One "etcetera" suffices as a substitute for even the 999,997 missing reasons here. The plural noun can be a lot of fun: "The prince arrived with a ton of luggage and an entourage of busy little etceteras."

    Etymology: Today's word is a Latin two-word phrase, et "and" plus cetera "the others." "Cetera" comes from *ke-etero- where tero- means "a second time, again," also found in ceteris paribus "other things being the same." The ke- is an ancient word for "this." Because [k] became [h] in initial position in English, we are not surprised that "here, hence, hither" all begin with this root. It also turns up in "he/him" and "her" (dative-accusative of Old English heo "she.") The neuter 3rd singular pronoun in Old English was hit "it," heard today in some rural dialects in the Southeastern United States. In Old Russian *ke- developed into sei "this," found today in segodnya "today" and seichas "right now" from a time when chas, now "hour," meant "moment."
     
    Picasso

    Picasso

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    Ok (adjective)

    Pronunciation: [o-'key]

    Definition: As an adverb or adjective, today's word means "all right." When it's a noun, it's an approval, and the verb means "to approve."

    Usage: OK is spelled OK, O.K., Ok, or okay. The US astronauts have extended it to A-OK, meaning "absolutely OK."

    Suggested Usage: If you listen closely, you'll hear this word sprinkled in every European language, and others as well. That's because of the spread of the English language, the far-flung reaches of American popular culture, and the term's brevity coupled with its usefulness. It's an Americanism of the first order: a shorthand way of communicating your satisfaction in any situation, which has gone around the world. That is OK by us.

    Etymology: Urban legend has it that Andrew Jackson, with a dubious grasp of written English, spelled "all correct" as "oll korrect." Another assigns "OK" to a World War II body-count system which included 0K (zero + K), meaning "zero killed," implying that everything is all right. But OK entered English well before the 1940s. Allen Read claims that the word entered American English in the Boston Morning Post in March of 1839 during a fad of acronyms and abbreviations, including OFM (Our First Men), NG (no go), and SP (small potatoes). Apparently, it was the scenesters' jargon of the time. As scenesters tried to establish an even more "elite" vocabulary for the in-crowd, facetious spellings began to appear, with NG turning to KG (Know Go). OK came from that silly spelling "Oll Korrect." By autumn, 1840, the term had traveled from New York to New Orleans via the popular press, and during the Van Buren campaign, OK was used to take advantage of the acronym game to refer to "Old Kinderhook," an extension of the name of Van Buren's birthplace in the Hudson Valley, Kinderhook.
     
    Picasso

    Picasso

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    Reticent (adjective)

    Pronunciation: ['re-t�-s�nt]

    Definition: Reluctant to speak or say anything; taciturn.

    Usage: This word is misused so often to mean "reluctant to do anything" that the errant meaning is creeping into US dictionaries. This adjective has but one meaning: "reluctant to speak or express oneself."

    Suggested Usage: The remarkable aspect of this misused term is that it has so many interesting legitimate uses: "Bill was understandably reticent about the lipstick on his collar" or "Hillary became abruptly reticent when asked about the box of chocolates under the couch." Let's restore the original precision of this hapless word's meaning.

    Etymology: Latin reticentia "silence" from re-tic-eo "I am silent", based in turn on re + tac-ere "be silent". The stem tac- may also be found in "taciturn" and "tacit."
     
    shadow1

    shadow1

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    Picasso have you ever given a thought to how many years it would take you to to publish the words of the day 3a hal lim3addal? You might wanna change your reading habits.

    What puzzles me to ask you is there like an astronomical reason that makes you choose one particular word and make it the Word Of The Day?
     
    Picasso

    Picasso

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    Picasso have you ever given a thought to how many years it would take you to to publish the words of the day 3a hal lim3addal? You might wanna change your reading habits.

    What puzzles me to ask you is there like an astronomical reason that makes you choose one particular word and make it the Word Of The Day?
    I chose some words I liked to begin the thread with. But then the choosing will be arbitrary.

    And we will post a word every day, the rest of the words in the millionth-word language will be your task to post them, with their etymology and to name the books and articles they were used in.
     
    L

    Last Knight

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    Conceited [kuhn-see-tid]

    1. having a high or exaggerated opinion of oneself or one's accomplishments / having an excessively favorable opinion of one's abilities, appearance, etc.

    2. archaic: fanciful

    3. obsolete: witty or intelligent


    Famous Quotations:

    "People that are conceited of their own merit take pride in being unfortunate, that themselves and others may think them considerable enough to be the envy and the mark of fortune." - François La Rochefoucauld, Duc De

    "To attempt to advise conceited people is like whistling against the wind." - Thomas Hood


    (I like this game btw :msnsmile:)
     
    Picasso

    Picasso

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    Segue (verb)

    Pronunciation: ['seg-wey]

    Definition: To proceed without pause from one musical piece to another; to make a transition without interruption.

    Usage: "Segue" escaped the bounds of the musical world and crept into academic jargon in the 1980's and since then has spread well beyond the ivy-covered halls. It is all too often used as a synonym of "transition," which it is not, but rather a shift from one theme or thought to another without an intervening transition.

    Suggested Usage: "The jazz quintet segued directly from a moody blues rendition of 'It's Been a Long Time' to an upbeat arrangement of 'Smoke Gets in your Eyes.'" Today's word may used to point out a missing necessary transition, "From a critique of Kant's categorical imperative Ramsey segued into a story about his last trout-fishing trip, leaving most of us behind and a bit befuddled."

    Etymology: Today's word was lifted directly from Italian segue "there follows," 3rd person singular seguire "to follow" from Vulgar Latin *sequere "to follow." The Latin word is based on PIE *sekw- which underlies dozens of Latinate English words, including "sect," "sequel," "execute," "sequence," "sue," and "society" (from Latin socius "companion," originally "follower"). "Second" derives from *sekw+ondo from Latin secundus "following, next."
     
    NMA

    NMA

    Well-Known Member
    Ingenue

    in·gé·nue also in·ge·nue (zh-n)
    n.
    1. A naive, innocent girl or young woman.
    2.
    a. The role of an ingénue in a dramatic production.
    b. An actress playing such a role.
    [French, feminine of ingénu, guileless, from Latin ingenuus, ingenuous; see ingenuous.]
     
    Picasso

    Picasso

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    Gothic (adjective)

    Pronunciation: ['gah-thik]

    Definition: Referring to the Teutonic tribes (Goths) who sacked Rome and provided the final impetus to collapse the Roman Empire from 378-450, hence barbarous, crude; a medieval art and architecture style of northern Europe, from the 12th through 15th centuries; fiction that emphasizes the grotesque, mysterious and desolate.

    Usage: The connotations of "Gothic" have changed over time, but the word stays alive. "Barbarous" reflects the Roman attitude toward the Germanic tribes that Rome never conquered effectively. After the Dark Ages, Gothic referred to architecture that did not follow Latin or Greek aesthetic principles. In the 18th and 19th centuries, "Gothic" categorized a popular literary genre that relied on the mysterious and desolate to create sensation in the reader. Ann Radcliffe's 'The Mysteries of Udolpho' (1794) is the epitome of the Gothic, and a very fun read. In contemporary U.S. subculture, the word "Goths" describes people who affect a dramatically depressive look by wearing black, whitening their faces, emphasizing the eyes and lips with heavy make-up, and wearing elaborate, dyed hairstyles.

    Suggested Usage: To make a theoretical statement, one might say, "In style and art, the Gothic seeks to reject accepted standards of propriety or proportion." Are the Goosebumps books for kids yet another incarnation of the gothic? Probably, but the true Gothic in art relies on suspense to heighten the reader's response. "Horror" annihilates the ability to respond thoughtfully because of its displays of violence or depravity. Mary Shelley's 'Frankenstein, or The Modern Prometheus' is the epitome of a Gothic work. Shelley's depiction of the Creature encourages us to consider the human condition, the ethics of scientific advancement, and moral responsibility.

    Etymology: From Old English Gota, Greek Gothoi, related to Gothic gutthiuda "Gothic people." The meaning of gutthiuda is taken to be "men, people" judging from the stem gut- or got- in Old Norse, but a definitive etymology of "gothic" is unknown. Parts of the Bible were translated into the West Gothic language in the 4th century (Wulfila Bible). The dialects of Gothic were Crimean Gothic, Ostrogoth and Visigoth. The last speakers were reported in the Crimea in the 18th century. By the way, "vandal" comes from the name of the other Germanic tribe fighting alongside the Goths against the Romans: "the Vandals and the Goths."
    .
     
    Picasso

    Picasso

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    Chauvinism (noun)

    Pronunciation: ['sho-vên-i-zêm]

    Definition: Excessive nationalistic fervor, superpatriotism; also, excessive prejudicial devotion to and aggressive promotion of one's own idea, belief, and so forth.

    Usage: Today's term is most widely used to refer to societies convinced that males are better suited for important, decision-making roles (male chauvinism). However, religious chauvinism is reflected in the expansion of the various major religions, and cultural chauvinism, in the empire-building of the 19th century. A person given to chauvinistic (the adjective) behavior is a chauvinist.

    Suggested Usage: The history of today's word describes a semantic drift toward an ever-broadening meaning, excessive fervor for virtually anything: "Winifred is a cricket chauvinist; not only will he not discuss any other sports, he won't let anyone else discuss them, either." The adjective and adverb can be used on an even more personal level, "Sean so chauvinistically defends Gladys before her critics, you would think they were intimately involved."

    Etymology: Nicolas Chauvin, the eponym of today's word, served as a soldier under Napoleon to the bitter end of the Grande Armee. Chauvin was born in the city of smelly cheese, Roquefort, France around 1790. He was wounded several times, resulting in disfigurement and probably mental instability. His gung-ho patriotism and devotion to the emperor was rewarded by Napoleon himself. After the war, however, he was mocked in several Vaudeville plays, especially 'La Cocarde Tricolore' (1831), which left the pejorative connotation that still clings to the word today.
     
    Picasso

    Picasso

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    Vandal (noun)

    Pronunciation: ['vوn-dêl]

    Definition: (1) A member of a Germanic tribe that invaded Western Europe and North Africa from the Baltic in the 4th and 5th centuries A.D., establishing settlements along the way, and sacked Rome in 455; (2) a nasty person who destroys property that does not belong to them.

    Usage: Today's word has generated considerable family. The process of destroying the property of others is "vandalism" from the verb, "to vandalize." This noun produced vandalistic "given to vandalism" and the adverb, "vandalistically." There is also an adjective, vandalic "like a vandal, barbarous."

    Suggested Usage: Unfortunately, vandalism has become so commonplace, particularly in large cities, that the meaning of today's word is painfully evident to most English speakers, "Enron is an example of what happens to a company ransacked by vandals rather than operated by responsible corporate executives." The newest weapon of vandals is the spray-paint can, which allows them to aesthetically vandalize buildings, busses, and subways without physically harming them.

    Etymology: Today's word is a commonization of the Latin name of the Vandals, a Germanic people who vandalized much of Europe and northern Africa. We took the word, however, from their Latin name, "Vandalus," after the Romans had borrowed it from some Germanic language, probably some *wandal-. It is related to Old English "Wendlas" and Old Norse "Vendill," both designating the inhabitants of northern Jutland and, probably, to "Wends," a people now living in Poland who call themselves Sorbs. These words probably share a common root with "wend" (whence the current past tense of "go") and "wander." During their destructive meandering through Europe, the Vandals settled for a while in the area of Spain known as "Andalusia," probably from an original "Vandalusia."
     
    Picasso

    Picasso

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    Tendentious (adjective)

    Pronunciation: [ten-'den-ch�s]

    Definition: Exhibiting a strong tendency or point of view, overbearingly didactic or partisan.

    Usage: Not to be confused with "tendential" which means simply "relating to a tendency." "Tendential ideas" are those with a decided point of view but not an overbearing one. "Tendentious ideas" so strongly support a tendency as to become repulsive.

    Suggested Usage: Remember that today's word is pejorative and use it with care: "I find Rodney tendentious in his ideas and I have long since desisted in discussing politics with him." This does not mean it lacks household uses, "I find your reasoning for not cleaning out the garage tendentious and would prefer pursuing the matter no further. Do it!"

    Etymology: From Latin tendencia "a cause," the noun of tendere "to tend to." "Tendere" comes from PIE *ten "stretch", which also gave us English "thin." English "tone" is from Greek tonos "string" hence "sound, pitch," of the same origin. Greek tetanos "stiff, rigid," Sanskrit tantram "loom," and Persian tar "string" from which "sitar" is derived, all share the same origin. "Tenor" is a Latin borrowing from tenere "to hold," another variant of *ten.
     
    Danny Z

    Danny Z

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    she·nan·i·gan

     /ʃəˈnوnɪgən/
    –noun Informal .
    1.
    Usually, shenanigans.
    a.
    mischief; prankishness: Halloween shenanigans.
    b.
    deceit; trickery.
    2.
    a mischievous or deceitful trick, practice, etc.
     
    Picasso

    Picasso

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    Kitsch (noun)

    Pronunciation: [kich]

    Definition: Art or decoration exemplifying taste both pretentious and bad. More broadly, anything that appeals to a popular, vulgar sensibility.

    Usage: "Kitsch" can also be an adjective, rendering "kitschy" redundant. "Kitschify" is the facetiously contrived verb which, unfortunately, begs "kitschification," "kitschifiable," and so on. Let's not let this derivation get out of hand.

    Suggested Usage: "Kitsch" implies that an artwork is either cloying, ostentatious, or both: "The Lazy Boy recliner was just too kitsch for the otherwise contemporary furnishings in Llewellyn's living room." "Bethany wasn't in a mood for high-brow culture, so she settled for a weekend of kitsch at the local craft fair." A little bit of kitsch may be necessary in our lives. Kitsch is popular culture that binds classes together in many industrialized countries.

    Etymology: German dialectal kitsch "trash, knickknack, shoddiness" of unknown origin.

    Wikipedia - Kitsch
     
    Picasso

    Picasso

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    Pretentious (adjective)

    Pronunciation: [pri-'ten-shuh s]

    Definition: Full of pretense; that is, ostentatious, assuming dignity or importance.

    Usage: When an individual uses the word pretentious, it is sometimes without the full understanding of the term. T.S. Eliot in his "Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock" perhaps described the term best when he deemed a character "full of high sentence, but a bit obtuse." Pretentious refers to the explicit or implicit claim to some excellence, intelligence, or importance. Webster's Unabridged Dictionary's apt description in 1913 was simply, "disposed to lay claim to more than is one's," a suggestion that makes perfect sense given today's usage.

    Suggested Usage: Pretentious is the kid you used to know who said "I can do it, I just don't feel like it right now." While you wouldn't have called him pretentious back then, you knew exactly what he was doing -- he was claiming, expressly, to be something that he is not. Great at Super Mario Brothers, maybe, or a fluent speaker of Klingon perhaps, but whatever the case, that kid almost certainly grew up to be one of those guys who's claimed to see every French movie ever released in the United States thus making your taste in cinema "ever so blasé." Oh, and yes, he still deserves a swift kick in the pants.

    Etymology: Pretentious began as a Late Latin term, prوtensus, the past participle of prوtendere, to pretend. From there, it was used in France as prétention, equivalent to the English term pretension with which we are familiar. In 1845, pretentious appears in the English language, probably a bastardization of the French prétentieux.
     
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