Word of the Day

Shev

Shev

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OK

Today, "OK" is probably one of the most universally known English words. But it originated in 1839 as a joke, mocking the semi-literate, who supposedly spelled "all correct" as "oll korrect". Basically, OK was the "Get a Brain! MORANS" of its day.


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  • Joe tayyar

    Joe tayyar

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    OK

    Today, "OK" is probably one of the most universally known English words. But it originated in 1839 as a joke, mocking the semi-literate, who supposedly spelled "all correct" as "oll korrect". Basically, OK was the "Get a Brain! MORANS" of its day.


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    Isint it 0 killed?

    During historic civil wars, when troops returned without any casualities a writing was put up so all can see which read "0 Killed". From here we get the expression "O.K" which means all is good.

     
    Picasso

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    Isint it 0 killed?

    During historic civil wars, when troops returned without any casualities a writing was put up so all can see which read "0 Killed". From here we get the expression "O.K" which means all is good.

    This word is already posted, check here.
     
    Picasso

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    Cronyism [krṓnee ىzzəm]
    noun

    doing favors for friends: special treatment and preference given to friends or colleagues, especially in politics (disapproving)
     
    Picasso

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    Tidings [tdingz]
    plural noun

    news: news or information (literary)

    I bring you glad tidings.


    [ Old English tīdung, alteration of Old Norse tيًendi "events"]
     
    Picasso

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    hinge [hinj]
    (plural hing·es)
    noun

    1. joint: a movable joint of metal or plastic used to fasten two things, e.g. a box and its lid, together and allow one of them to pivot
    The hinges on the door need oiling.

    2. ZOOLOGY ligament: a part in animals that operates like a hinge, e.g. the ligament that opens and closes the two halves of a clam or other bivalve mollusk

    3. ANATOMY Same as hinge joint

    4. something vital: something on which a subsequent action or an outcome depends
    5. sticky paper strip: a thin gummed paper strip that is folded in half to affix postage stamps to the pages of an album


    [13th century. Probably ultimately < Germanic]


    -hinged, adjective
    -hinge·less, adjective
     
    Picasso

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    Pedantic [pə dلntik]
    adjective

    too concerned with formal rules and details: too concerned with what are thought to be correct rules and details, e.g. in language

    -pe·dan·ti·cal·ly, adverb
     
    Picasso

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    Interim

    adjective /ˈɪn.tər.ɪm//-t ̬ɚ-/ [before noun]


    Temporary and intended to be used or accepted until something permanent exists

    An interim solution

    An interim government was set up for the period before the country's first free election.



     
    Picasso

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    S-curve   [es-kurv]
    noun

    A curve shaped like an S.


     
    Picasso

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    Allude [ə ld]

    (past and past participle al·lud·ed, present participle al·lud·ing, 3rd person present singular al·ludes)

    intransitive verb

    mention indirectly: to refer to something or somebody indirectly, without giving a precise name or explicit identification

    I presume you are alluding to the alleged financial discrepancy.


    [Mid-16th century. < Latin alludere "play to" < ludere < ludus "play"]


    allude or elude?

    Do not confuse the spelling of allude and elude, which sound similar. Allude is usually followed by to, as in alluding to the disappearance of her husband. Elude means "escape from," "avoid," or "be beyond": He eluded his pursuers. Her name eludes me.

    allude or refer?

    The sentence She alluded to her husband by name is a self-contradiction, because allude means "to mention indirectly." When the reference is direct, the word to use is refer. So if she mentioned "the man at home looking after the children," she was alluding to her husband, whereas if she mentioned "George" or "my husband" directly, she was referring to him: She referred to her husband frequently.
     
    Picasso

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    bona fide [bṓnə fd, bnə fdee, bَnnə fd, bٍnnə fdee]
    adjective

    1. authentic: authentic and genuine in nature
    a bona fide offer

    2. sincere and honest: without any intention to deceive


    [< Latin, "with good faith"]
     
    Shev

    Shev

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    سيبقى اذار يأتي بعد شباط

    والصبح ينبلج بعد ظلام الليل

    سوف يأتي الخميس بعد الأربعاء



    Elad
    Word of the day: ينبلج

    never heard of it before.

    and welcome back, Booya! :D
     
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    Dres·den [drézdən]
    capital of the state of Saxony in east central Germany. Almost completely destroyed during World War II, it has been largely rebuilt and restored.
    Population: 487,400 (2005 estimate)
     
    Picasso

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    Is·tri·a [يstree ə]
    peninsula in northwestern Croatia and southwestern Slovenia, projecting into the Adriatic Sea.
    Area: 3,885 sq km/1,500 sq mi.
     
    Shev

    Shev

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    word of the day: ينبلج

    never heard of it before.

    And welcome back, booya! :d

    انبلجَ ينبلج ، انبِلاجًا ، فهو مُنبلِج:
    • انبلج الصُّبحُ طلَع، بلَج، أشرق وأضاء "انبلج على البلاد فجرٌ جديد، - انبلاج الفجر".
    • انبلج الحقُّ: بلَج، وضَح، ظهَر، نصَع.
    المعجم: اللغة العربية المعاصر
     
    Picasso

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    Errand [érrənd]
    (plural er·rands)

    noun

    1. short trip for somebody else's benefit: a short trip somewhere to do something on behalf of somebody else, e.g. to buy something or deliver a message
    • She sometimes runs errands for me if I'm not well enough to go out.
    2. task undertaken for somebody else: a task that somebody goes somewhere to carry out for somebody else


    [ Old English ǣrende "message, mission" < ?]
     
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