Word of the Day

Picasso

Picasso

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good·bye [gd b]
or good-bye [gd b]
interjection

farewell: used when people part or end a telephone conversation
  • Goodbye! I'll see you next year.

noun (plural good·byes) (plural good-byes)

act of leaving: an act of making a farewell
  • It's time to say our goodbyes and catch the plane.

[Late 16th century. < God be with you]
 
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  • Layyouss

    Layyouss

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    In memory of Picasso, we revive this thread.

    mamihlapinatapai

    The word Mamihlapinatapai (sometimes spelled mamihlapinatapei) is derived from the Yaghan language of Tierra del Fuego, listed in The Guinness Book of World Records as the "most succinct word", and is considered[who?] one of the hardest words to translate. It refers to "a look shared by two people, each wishing that the other will offer something that they both desire but are unwilling to suggest or offer themselves."[1] It is also cited in books and articles on game theory associated with the volunteer's dilemma.[2][3]
    It is also referenced in Defining the World in a discussion of the difficulties facing Samuel Johnson in trying to arrive at succinct, yet accurate, definitions of words.
    The word consists of the reflexive/passive prefix ma- (mam- before a vowel), the root ihlapi (pronounced [iɬapi]), which means to be at a loss as what to do next, the stative suffix -n, an achievement suffix -ata, and the dual suffix -apai, which in composition with the reflexive mam- has a reciprocal sense.
     
    kalel

    kalel

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    tidings
    \ TAHY-dingz \ , noun;
    1.
    News, information, or intelligence: sad tidings .

    Quotes:

    There were voices which came from the mountains, with tidings from far away and sweet breathings of the spirit. -- Arthur Edward Waite, Quest of the Golden Stairs

    "How would my heart have leapt at that sound but yesterday!" thought she, remembering the anxiety with which she had long awaited tidings from her husband.-- Nathaniel Hawthorne, "The Wives of the Dead," The Oxford Book of American Short Stories

    Origin:

    Tidings is most used in the phrase "glad tidings," but it was a word on its own before it entered Christmas lore. The word came from the Old Norse word tīthindi meaning "news." It is related to the common word "tide."
     
    kalel

    kalel

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    avidity
    \ uh-VID-i-tee \ , noun;

    1. Enthusiasm or dedication.
    2. Eagerness; greediness.


    Quotes:

    One may speak about anything on earth with fire, with enthusiasm, with ecstasy, but one only speaks about oneself with avidity -- Ivan Sergeevich Turgenev, "A Correspondence," Essential Turgenev

    Come, walk up, and purchase with avidity , Overcome your diffidence and natural timidity! -- William S. Gilbert, Arthur Seymour Sullivan, Patience; or, Bunthorne's Bride

    Origin:

    Avidity appeared in English in the mid-1500s, originating from the French word avide , meaning "to crave, long for." The term adds a dimension of intensity to the "eagerness" with which it is often equated.
     
    Ose

    Ose

    New Member
    [Ose]

    In demonology, Ose is a Great President of Hell, ruling three legions of demons (thirty to other authors, and Pseudomonarchia Daemonum gives no number of legions). He makes men wise in all liberal sciences and gives true answers concerning divine and secret things; he also brings insanity to any person the conjurer wishes, making him/her believe that he/she is the creature or thing the magician desired, or makes that person think he is a king and wearing a crown, or a Pope.

    Ose is depicted as a leopard that after a while changes into a man.

    His name seems to derive from Latin 'os', mouth, language, or 'osor', that who abhors.
     
    kalel

    kalel

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    filch
    \ filch \ , verb;

    1. To steal (especially something of small value); pilfer: to filch ashtrays from fancy restaurants .

    Quotes:
    …but any way they resemble the buffoons at the fair, who beg, grab and filch material, here and there and everywhere, in order later to deal it out in a small folio -- Nikolai Gogol, The Diary of a Madman and Other Stories

    Still, gobbling real food after days of clean garbage and public filch , she had let her antennae droop -- Toni Morrison, Love

    Origin:
    Filch is of unknown origin. It may be related to the name for a kind of hook that could be used to steal small items from kitchen windows. It also may have come from the Middle English word filchen meaning "to attack (in a body), take as booty."
     
    B

    BOILER

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    kanban \KAHN-bahn\


    noun:
    A manufacturing strategy wherein parts are produced or delivered only as needed

    EXAMPLES

    "To stay competitive," Rob said, "we need to reduce our manufacturing costs by switching to a kanban system."

    "The inbox and calendar are used to generate kanban and schedules. This helps to discriminate between what you are doing and what you should be doing." — From an article by Marc A. Feldman in the Quality Progress, November 2012

    Toyota Motor Company is credited with developing the kanban system of manufacturing, which takes its name from the Japanese word for "sign" or "placard." In the kanban system, each shipment of parts used in making a product comes with a "kanban," or sign. When the parts are nearly exhausted, the sign is sent to suppliers, who ship new ones to the assembly line. In the early 1980s, "kanban" became a buzzword in the American business community—offering a perfect example of how languages often reflect larger societal trends … and how trading partners often trade more than durable goods.
     
    kalel

    kalel

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    preconcert
    \ pree-kuhn-SURT \ , verb;

    1.
    To arrange in advance or beforehand, as by a previous agreement.

    adjective:
    1.
    Preceding a concert: a preconcert reception for sponsors .


    Quotes:

    Indeed she did not really suspect the visitor, who was one too ingenuous in his nature to preconcert so subtle and so wicked a scheme -- Anthony Trollope, Dr. Wortle's School

    If personal accidents, and accidents so trivial, could, to any serious extent, be amongst the causes of war, then it would become a hopeful duty to preconcert personal combinations that should take an opposite direction -- Thomas De Quincey, The Works of Thomas De Quincey

    Origin:

    Though today concert is most often a noun, it was usually used as a verb in the 1700s typically in the sense of "to bring together" or "to arrange." Preconcert thus meant "to arrange beforehand."
     
    kalel

    kalel

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    hypnopompic
    \ hip-nuh-POM-pik \ , adjective;
    1.
    Of or pertaining to the semiconscious state prior to complete wakefulness.

    Quotes:

    He shudders, snaps himself out of it; as one can, with effort, do, to escape from a bad dream, working one's way in stages, toward hypnopompic state until finally, fully awake -- Mary Caponegro, The Star Cafe

    He woke fitfully, from a dream where his work had gone terribly wrong. He was still hypnopompic -- Richard Powers, The Echo Maker

    Origin:

    Hypnopompic literally means "sending away sleep" in Greek. It was coined in English in the early 1900s from the roots hypno- meaning "sleep" and pomp meaning "sending away."
     
    kalel

    kalel

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    jubilarian
    \ joo-buh-LAIR-ee-uhn \ , noun;
    1.
    A person who celebrates or has celebrated a jubilee, as a nun observing 25 or more years of religious life.

    Quotes:
    To enable the school to open in 1916, Sisters Agnes Geraghty and Corona Hargrafen, golden jubilarians , had come out of retirement, and Sister Juliana Kritenbrink, another golden jubilarian , joined them the next year -- O. P. Dolores Enderle, Suzanne Noffke, The Dominicans of Racine, Wisconsin

    The crowd was so great that when the doors were closed at a late hour to relieve the strain on the seventy-two-year-old jubilarian , a line of people still reached around the south and west sides of the Square -- Patrick Ryan, Archbishop Patrick John Ryan His Life and Times

    Origin:
    In Biblical tradition, the jubilee is a yearlong celebration which occurs every 50 years. All debts are forgiven and lands returned to their original owners. Today jubilees are often celebrations of significant anniversaries, particularly every 25, 50, 60 or 75 years. Jubliarian refers to anyone who has or is celebrating a significant 25-year milestone.
     
    kalel

    kalel

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    allocution
    \ al-uh-KYOO-shuhn \ , noun;
    1.
    A formal speech, especially one of an incontrovertible or hortatory nature.

    2.
    A pronouncement delivered by the pope to a secret consistory, especially on a matter of policy or of general importance.

    Quotes:
    The little crowd, with some ironical cheers and hootings, nevertheless felt the force of Madame Fribsby's vigorous allocution , and retreated before her… -- William Makepeace Thackeray, The History of Pendennis

    Towards midday, the abbé Pirard took leave of his pupils, not without first delivering a severe allocution -- Stendhal, The Red and the Black

    Origin:
    Allocution stems from the Latin root alloquī which meant to "to speak, address." The suffix -ion forms nouns from stems, as in the words communion and opinion .
     
    kalel

    kalel

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    en règle
    \ ahn RE-gluh \ , adjective;

    1.
    In order; according to the rules; correct.


    Quotes:

    This was all done en règle , and in our work we shall be en règle too. We shall not go so early that the policemen who have then little to think of, shall deem it strange -- Bram Stoker, Dracula

    I told her it was not quite en règle to bring one so far out of our own set; but she said, 'Genius itself is not en règle ; it comes into the world to make new rules ' -- George Eliot, Daniel Deronda

    Origin:

    En règle snuck into the English language in the 1810s. It came directly from the French phrase of the same spelling which meant literally "in rule."
     
    kalel

    kalel

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    intemerate
    \ in-TEM-er-it \ , adjective;
    1.
    Inviolate; undefiled; unsullied; pure.


    Quotes:

    The rain smelled cool and earthy, and with her eyes closed it sounded louder and nearer; it seemed to be in the room, falling small and touchless upon her; it was clear, intemerate as the sky -- Fred Chappell, The Inkling

    Did you know, sir, that I can trace my intemerate ancestry to Adam through the paternal line, and to Eve through the maternal line? -- Andrew Drummond, Handbook of Volapük

    Origin:

    Intemerate comes from the Latin root emerā which meant "to violate, desecrate." The prefix in- means "not" as in the words indefensible and inexpensive .
     
    Picasso

    Picasso

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    Et patati et patata

    Pronunciation: [ay pa ta tee ay pa ta ta]

    Meaning: and so on and so forth, blah blah, yada yada

    Register: informal

    Notes: The informal French exclamation et patati et patata might be one of most useful expressions you never realized you needed. It comes from patatin, patatan, the French equivalent of "giddyup." I love the image the onomatopoeic French expression evokes: someone's mouth running off like a galloping horse.

    Example:

    Elle m'a dit de faire la lessive, les lits, la vaiselle et patati et patata.
    She told me to do the laundry, make the beds, do the dishes, yada yada.

    Synonyms

    et ainsi de suite
    et bla bla bla (informal)
    et cetera
    et j'en passe
    je vous fais cadeau des détails
     
    Picasso

    Picasso

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    Juventus

    Roman god of youth, personification of iuventas "youth," from iuvenis "a young person"
     
    Picasso

    Picasso

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    factotum
    noun

    a person employed to do all types of jobs for someone:

    He became a sort of general factotum for the band.

    Cambridge Dictionary
     
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