Gives Hope World Bank gives Lebanon US$295 million for building its public transport

Jo

Administrator
Master Penguin
#1
Today the World Bank approved the financing of the first modern public transport in Lebanon in over 50 years!!
The Greater Beirut Public Transport Project consists of 40 km of BRT lanes and 20 lines of regular buses.



WASHINGTON DC, March 15, 2018: The World Bank approved today a US$295 million package ushering in the overhaul of Lebanon’s decaying transport sector and securing employment for thousands of unskilled Lebanese and Syrian workers. The Greater Beirut Public Transport Project (GBPTP) will jumpstart the country’s first modern public transport system in decades, ease stifling congestions on Lebanese roads, and unlock private finance to a vital infrastructure sector.

GBPTP is the first project to benefit from a newly approved Public-Private Partnership law that aims to attract private investments in infrastructure to ease the financial burdens of a government struggling with high public debt and fiscal imbalances. It is in line with the World Bank Group’s own drive for Maximizing Financing for Development (MFD) in member countries, especially those under economic and financial duress.

“Lebanon needs to mobilize private investment to stimulate its economy and create jobs while also developing its much-needed infrastructure,” Saroj Kumar Jha, World Bank Regional Director for the Mashreq, commented after the Bank’s Board of Directors endorsed the project. “Poor transport connectivity exacerbates the already problematic inequitable growth between Beirut and hinterland regions. It hinders access to employment and services for the poor and other vulnerable groups.”

The project is expected to create two million labor days in construction jobs for low-income Lebanese and Syrians. The project represents the first phase of an ambitious national public transport program. It is expected to attract about 300,000 passengers per day and halve the commuting time between Beirut and its northern suburbs. GBPTP is likely to be followed by additional phases covering the southern and eastern entrances to Beirut.

GBPTP will have substantial social and environmental benefits. The safe, modern, and reliable transport system will improve the mobility of women, youth and persons with disabilities. The introduction of new and clean buses running on dedicated lanes will attract private vehicle users, significantly reducing congestion and greenhouse gas emissions and improving air quality.

Ziad El-Nakat, Senior Transport Specialist at the Bank, highlighted the large economic costs of traffic congestion in Lebanon which are estimated by various studies as between 5% and 10% of national GDP. “In economic terms, the annual cost of traffic congestion is above US$2 billion, representing a large impediment to growth and regional connectivity,” he said.

El-Nakat, who headed a team of experts that designed the project, said Lebanon is cognizant of the importance of the transport to economic growth. He added that this is why the sector accounts for one third of the overall multi-billion Capital Investment Plan which the government will unveil at an international conference in support of Lebanon, slated for April 6, 2018, in Paris.

Lebanon’s infrastructure in general had been deteriorating for years due to lack of funds. But the situation worsened with the influx of some 1.5 million Syrian refugees, who now make up roughly 25% of the resident population. “This has resulted in an increase in traffic levels in the range of 15% to 25%."

The project envisages the purchase of 120 buses to service 40 kilometers of dedicated Bus Rapid Transit lanes from northern districts to the heart of Beirut. Additionally, 250 feeder buses will operate between the main stations and the hinterland. The project will also mobilize private sector investments, in the range of US$50 million and US$80 million for the purchase of the BRT buses and their operations. The planned BRT system and its feeder bus network will be operated and maintained by the private sector.

The project will be financed by a US$225.2 million loan. The Global Concessional Financing Facility (GCFF) is contributing another US$69.8 million on a grant basis. The GCFF provides low- or no-interest financing packages to middle-income countries whose economies are strained by refugee inflows. The loan will be paid over 31.5 years, including an eight-year grace period.

The new financing raises the total value of World Bank commitments to Lebanon to US$1.7 billion.

Source: World Bank Supports Lebanon’s Public Transport to Improve Mobility, Spur Growth
 
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  • LVV

    Well-Known Member
    #4
    Today the World Bank approved the financing of the first modern public transport in Lebanon in over 50 years!!
    The Greater Beirut Public Transport Project consists of 40 km of BRT lanes and 20 lines of regular buses.



    WASHINGTON DC, March 15, 2018: The World Bank approved today a US$295 million package ushering in the overhaul of Lebanon’s decaying transport sector and securing employment for thousands of unskilled Lebanese and Syrian workers. The Greater Beirut Public Transport Project (GBPTP) will jumpstart the country’s first modern public transport system in decades, ease stifling congestions on Lebanese roads, and unlock private finance to a vital infrastructure sector.

    GBPTP is the first project to benefit from a newly approved Public-Private Partnership law that aims to attract private investments in infrastructure to ease the financial burdens of a government struggling with high public debt and fiscal imbalances. It is in line with the World Bank Group’s own drive for Maximizing Financing for Development (MFD) in member countries, especially those under economic and financial duress.

    “Lebanon needs to mobilize private investment to stimulate its economy and create jobs while also developing its much-needed infrastructure,” Saroj Kumar Jha, World Bank Regional Director for the Mashreq, commented after the Bank’s Board of Directors endorsed the project. “Poor transport connectivity exacerbates the already problematic inequitable growth between Beirut and hinterland regions. It hinders access to employment and services for the poor and other vulnerable groups.”

    The project is expected to create two million labor days in construction jobs for low-income Lebanese and Syrians. The project represents the first phase of an ambitious national public transport program. It is expected to attract about 300,000 passengers per day and halve the commuting time between Beirut and its northern suburbs. GBPTP is likely to be followed by additional phases covering the southern and eastern entrances to Beirut.

    GBPTP will have substantial social and environmental benefits. The safe, modern, and reliable transport system will improve the mobility of women, youth and persons with disabilities. The introduction of new and clean buses running on dedicated lanes will attract private vehicle users, significantly reducing congestion and greenhouse gas emissions and improving air quality.

    Ziad El-Nakat, Senior Transport Specialist at the Bank, highlighted the large economic costs of traffic congestion in Lebanon which are estimated by various studies as between 5% and 10% of national GDP. “In economic terms, the annual cost of traffic congestion is above US$2 billion, representing a large impediment to growth and regional connectivity,” he said.

    El-Nakat, who headed a team of experts that designed the project, said Lebanon is cognizant of the importance of the transport to economic growth. He added that this is why the sector accounts for one third of the overall multi-billion Capital Investment Plan which the government will unveil at an international conference in support of Lebanon, slated for April 6, 2018, in Paris.

    Lebanon’s infrastructure in general had been deteriorating for years due to lack of funds. But the situation worsened with the influx of some 1.5 million Syrian refugees, who now make up roughly 25% of the resident population. “This has resulted in an increase in traffic levels in the range of 15% to 25%."

    The project envisages the purchase of 120 buses to service 40 kilometers of dedicated Bus Rapid Transit lanes from northern districts to the heart of Beirut. Additionally, 250 feeder buses will operate between the main stations and the hinterland. The project will also mobilize private sector investments, in the range of US$50 million and US$80 million for the purchase of the BRT buses and their operations. The planned BRT system and its feeder bus network will be operated and maintained by the private sector.

    The project will be financed by a US$225.2 million loan. The Global Concessional Financing Facility (GCFF) is contributing another US$69.8 million on a grant basis. The GCFF provides low- or no-interest financing packages to middle-income countries whose economies are strained by refugee inflows. The loan will be paid over 31.5 years, including an eight-year grace period.

    The new financing raises the total value of World Bank commitments to Lebanon to US$1.7 billion.

    Source: World Bank Supports Lebanon’s Public Transport to Improve Mobility, Spur Growth
    Great achievement PMA Government
    Frankly country will begin to be much better in 5 years
     
    #5
    The World Bank approved today a US$295 million package ushering in the overhaul of Lebanon’s decaying transport sector and securing employment for thousands of unskilled Lebanese and Syrian workers
    The project is expected to create two million labor days in construction jobs for low-income Lebanese and Syrians.
    Lebanon’s infrastructure in general had been deteriorating for years due to lack of funds. But the situation worsened with the influx of some 1.5 million Syrian refugees, who now make up roughly 25% of the resident population
    Great news, at least they are securing jobs for the poor needy.... Syrians.

    They should also think about the jobless poor Palestinians.

    Great achievement.



    Wein el shanta ya Josephine?
     

    LVV

    Well-Known Member
    #6
    Crap crap crap
    Thousands of jobs for engineers and cadres
    More importantly much less traffic
    Much less pollution
    More beautiful country
    Great news, at least they are securing jobs for the poor needy.... Syrians.

    They should also think about the jobless poor Palestinians.

    Great achievement.



    Wein el shanta ya Josephine?
     
    #7
    That was also the logic of King Hiram of Tyre who built the First Temple in Jerusalem; he secured jobs for his people, architects and workers but he decimated the Cedars.

    Taro l arzeit but at least he secured jobs for his people
     

    LVV

    Well-Known Member
    #8
    Thousands of high paid jobs will be available to Lebanese if they want
    Second why not Lebanese workers on the ground
    Time for mentality to change in Lebanon
    And not everyone want to be director after 6 months
    This is the first modern public transportation system
    In this country
    Trying to attack this mean ignorance or lies
    That was also the logic of King Hiram of Tyre who built the First Temple in Jerusalem; he secured jobs for his people, architects and workers but he decimated the Cedars.

    Taro l arzeit but at least he secured jobs for his people
    Again PMA achievement plus government
    Why you don’t mention the unskilled Lebanese mentioned in the article
     
    #9
    Great news, at least they are securing jobs for the poor needy.... Syrians.

    They should also think about the jobless poor Palestinians.

    Great achievement.



    Wein el shanta ya Josephine?
    As if Lebanese people work in construction. Even before the syrian civil war and the refugee crisis you'd see very few lebanese working on construction sites (ofc excluding the engineers and contractors).
     

    LVV

    Well-Known Member
    #10
    And we can’t afford that luxury anymore
    Look all people work in construction
    In Lebanon we are not princes
    Work is not ayb


    As if Lebanese people work in construction. Even before the syrian civil war and the refugee crisis you'd see very few lebanese working on construction sites (ofc excluding the engineers and contractors).
     

    LVV

    Well-Known Member
    #11
    Hundreds of Lebanese will receive jobs
    Transportation engineering etc
    Plus thousands of people will benefit from economic cycles
    Plus a modern transportation
     
    #14
    And we can’t afford that luxury anymore
    Look all people work in construction
    In Lebanon we are not princes
    Work is not ayb
    Lebanese consider low wage jobs 3ayb, have you seen the sukleen workers? Most of them are from bengladesh. Gas station workers? Egyptians, syrians and from bengladesh too. Ldehen, and bricklayers? Egyptians and syrians. Most lebanese people think they deserve higher tier jobs even though they dropped out of school and spend the whole day playing li5a.
     
    #15
    Couple things can be done to improve traffic problem without even any infrastructure. Fans of discipline will like this one :D

    1- The "service" system: It provides cheap and flexible transportation true, but at cost of massive increase in traffic.
    2- Motorcycles: Same as above.

    We don't have to eliminate either but some discipline how they operate (or what they are allowed to do) could have a MASSIVE impact on traffic. The problem is stopping at random places along the road (for service), or forcing cars to slow down and change lanes (motorcycles zig zagging between cars). These little stops and slowdowns, when they occur throughout the entire roads create a massive snowball effect on traffic - because of the way traffic dynamic works in cities.

    If it is somehow possible to improve where and how services stop to pick up passengers, or prevent motorcycles from driving like they own the road (even 3aks el seir roads)... this alone will contribute a great deal to reducing traffic despite the congestion.
     
    #16
    It means they will have to live here in Lebanon, with their families....

    and later on, they will teach their children how they peacefully became the majority in Lebanon.


    Montreal or Sao Paulo?
     

    spacecreature

    Well-Known Member
    #18
    So Lebanon is getting more debt to create jobs for Syrians? Great news...
    That's just the construction part, akkid they will use Syrian labor like all construction sites in the country, but Lebanese will get jobs in it when it's done, not to mention less traffic! I think it's a good thing. I wish they would work on a train or subway of some sort too, this is mainly buses.
     

    spacecreature

    Well-Known Member
    #19
    Lebanese consider low wage jobs 3ayb, have you seen the sukleen workers? Most of them are from bengladesh. Gas station workers? Egyptians, syrians and from bengladesh too. Ldehen, and bricklayers? Egyptians and syrians. Most lebanese people think they deserve higher tier jobs even though they dropped out of school and spend the whole day playing li5a.
    Give me a good salary and the proper equipment so I don't get infected with something haha and I won't mind working in Sukleen. I often watch european TV channels and whenever I spot trash trucks the workers are mostly white blue eyed blonds. They get proper salaries and live as well as doctors teachers and architects. But here in this bloody country we have no pride in our nationality, instead of encouraging the Lebanese to take such jobs n give them the conditions that would make it possible for them to take on such jobs, we would rather pay less n get a Syrian Egyptian or Bengladshi! Even municipalities here in metn employ hundreds of Bangladeshis, (most of which are not even legal! Trust me I know this personally), when they can easily reduce the numbers n give Lebanese the jobs.
     

    manifesto

    Well-Known Member
    #20
    Tramways! Yay!

    One of the reasons I avoid riding the buses is because they'e smelly and play Ali El Deek music. If the government provides clean efficient public transportation, I'm sure the Lebanese will feel more encouraged to take the bus and tram than use their own cars.