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XI Emperor of China and Mao Sucessor ; The China of Xi and the World

Xi will

  • Make China the most important global power by 2050

    Votes: 1 25.0%
  • Make China one of the global powers by 2050

    Votes: 2 50.0%
  • Eliminate Corruption in China

    Votes: 2 50.0%
  • Solve the environment disaster in China

    Votes: 1 25.0%
  • Make a deal for religious freedom with the Vatican

    Votes: 1 25.0%
  • Fail in his plans

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • keep power for 20 years

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Keep powers for 30 years

    Votes: 2 50.0%
  • Lose power soon

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    4
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  • Iron Maiden

    Iron Maiden

    Paragon of Bacon
    Orange Room Supporter
    :D PEOPLE'S LIBERATION ARMY ..MAO XE DONG AMY

    Remembering the biggest mass murder in the history of the world


    IMG_5170.JPG

    [...] In pursuit of a utopian paradise, People had their work, homes, land, belongings and livelihoods taken from them. In collective canteens, food, distributed by the spoonful according to merit, became a weapon used to force people to follow the party's every dictate. As incentives to work were removed, coercion and violence were used instead to compel famished farmers to perform labour on poorly planned irrigation projects while fields were neglected.
    A catastrophe of gargantuan proportions ensued. Extrapolating from published population statistics, historians have speculated that tens of millions of people died of starvation. But the true dimensions of what happened are only now coming to light thanks to the meticulous reports the party itself compiled during the famine….
    What comes out of this massive and detailed dossier is a tale of horror in which Mao emerges as one of the greatest mass murderers in history, responsible for the deaths of at least 45 million people between 1958 and 1962. It is not merely the extent of the catastrophe that dwarfs earlier estimates, but also the manner in which many people died: between two and three million victims were tortured to death or summarily killed, often for the slightest infraction. When a boy stole a handful of grain in a Hunan village, local boss Xiong Dechang forced his father to bury him alive. The father died of grief a few days later. The case of Wang Ziyou was reported to the central leadership: one of his ears was chopped off, his legs were tied with iron wire, a ten kilogram stone was dropped on his back and then he was branded with a sizzling tool – punishment for digging up a potato.

    [...]
    I. Why We so Rarely Look Back on the Great Leap Forward
    What accounts for this neglect? One possible answer is that most of the victims were Chinese peasants – people who are culturally and socially distant from the Western intellectuals and media figures who have the greatest influence over our historical consciousness and popular culture. As a general rule, it is easier to empathize with victims who seem similar to ourselves.
    But an even bigger factor in our relative neglect of the Great Leap Forward is that it is part of the general tendency to downplay crimes committed by communist regimes, as opposed to right-wing authoritarians. Unlike in the days of Mao, today very few western intellectuals actually sympathize with communism. But many are reluctant to fully accept what a great evil it was, fearful – perhaps – that other left-wing causes might be tainted by association.


    The social-political movement launched in May 1966 by Mao Zedong followed a botched industrialization campaign where millions starved. It's a sensitive period in modern China's history. That's why this museum filled with relics from China's "Red Era", is one of a kind. From busts to badges, plates to posters - Chairman Mao and his vision are everywhere. (Reuters)
    In China, the regime has in recent years admitted that Mao made "mistakes" and allowed some degree of open discussion about this history. But the government is unwilling to admit that the mass murder was intentional and continues to occasionally suppress and persecute dissidents who point out the truth.
    This reluctance is an obvious result of the fact that the Communist Party still rules China. Although they have repudiated many of Mao's specific policies, the regime still derives much of its legitimacy from his legacy. I experienced China's official ambivalence on this subject first-hand, when I gave a talk about the issue while teaching a course as a visiting professor at a Chinese university in 2014.
    II. Why it Matters.
    For both Chinese and westerners, failure to acknowledge the true nature of the Great Leap Forward carries serious costs. Some survivors of the Great Leap Forward are still alive today. They deserve far greater recognition of the horrible injustice they suffered. They also deserve compensation for their losses, and the infliction of appropriate punishment on the remaining perpetrators.

    In addition, our continuing historical blind spot about the crimes of Mao and other communist rulers, leads us to underestimate the horrors of such policies, and makes it more likely that they might be revived in the future. The horrendous history of China, the USSR, and their imitators, should have permanently discredited socialism as completely as fascism was discredited by the Nazis. But it has not – so far – fully done so.
    Just recently, the socialist government of Venezuela imposed forced labor on much of its population. Yet most of the media coverage of this injustice fails to note the connection to socialism, or that the policy has parallels in the history of the Soviet Union, China, Cuba, and other similar regimes. One analysis even claims that the real problem is not so much "socialism qua socialism," but rather Venezuela's "particular brand of socialism, which fuses bad economic ideas with a distinctive brand of strongman bullying," and is prone to authoritarianism and "mismanagement." The author simply ignores the fact that "strongman bullying" and "mismanagement" are typical of socialist states around the world. The Scandinavian nations – sometimes cited as examples of successful socialism- are not actually socialist at all, because they do not feature government ownership of the means of production, and in many ways have freer markets than most other western nations.
    Related: [We ignore Venezuela’s imminent implosion at our peril]
    Venezuela's tragic situation would not surprise anyone familiar with the history of the Great Leap Forward. We would do well to finally give history's largest episode of mass murder the attention it deserves.

    Ilya Somin is Professor of Law at George Mason University. His research focuses on constitutional law, property law, and popular political participation. He is the author of "The Grasping Hand: Kelo v. City of New London and the Limits of Eminent Domain" and "Democracy and Political Ignorance: Why Smaller Government is Smarter."

    Original article Remembering the biggest mass murder in the history of the world
     
    gramsci

    gramsci

    Legendary Member
    Remembering the biggest mass murder in the history of the world


    View attachment 9736

    [...] In pursuit of a utopian paradise, People had their work, homes, land, belongings and livelihoods taken from them. In collective canteens, food, distributed by the spoonful according to merit, became a weapon used to force people to follow the party's every dictate. As incentives to work were removed, coercion and violence were used instead to compel famished farmers to perform labour on poorly planned irrigation projects while fields were neglected.
    A catastrophe of gargantuan proportions ensued. Extrapolating from published population statistics, historians have speculated that tens of millions of people died of starvation. But the true dimensions of what happened are only now coming to light thanks to the meticulous reports the party itself compiled during the famine….
    What comes out of this massive and detailed dossier is a tale of horror in which Mao emerges as one of the greatest mass murderers in history, responsible for the deaths of at least 45 million people between 1958 and 1962. It is not merely the extent of the catastrophe that dwarfs earlier estimates, but also the manner in which many people died: between two and three million victims were tortured to death or summarily killed, often for the slightest infraction. When a boy stole a handful of grain in a Hunan village, local boss Xiong Dechang forced his father to bury him alive. The father died of grief a few days later. The case of Wang Ziyou was reported to the central leadership: one of his ears was chopped off, his legs were tied with iron wire, a ten kilogram stone was dropped on his back and then he was branded with a sizzling tool – punishment for digging up a potato.

    [...]
    I. Why We so Rarely Look Back on the Great Leap Forward
    What accounts for this neglect? One possible answer is that most of the victims were Chinese peasants – people who are culturally and socially distant from the Western intellectuals and media figures who have the greatest influence over our historical consciousness and popular culture. As a general rule, it is easier to empathize with victims who seem similar to ourselves.
    But an even bigger factor in our relative neglect of the Great Leap Forward is that it is part of the general tendency to downplay crimes committed by communist regimes, as opposed to right-wing authoritarians. Unlike in the days of Mao, today very few western intellectuals actually sympathize with communism. But many are reluctant to fully accept what a great evil it was, fearful – perhaps – that other left-wing causes might be tainted by association.


    The social-political movement launched in May 1966 by Mao Zedong followed a botched industrialization campaign where millions starved. It's a sensitive period in modern China's history. That's why this museum filled with relics from China's "Red Era", is one of a kind. From busts to badges, plates to posters - Chairman Mao and his vision are everywhere. (Reuters)
    In China, the regime has in recent years admitted that Mao made "mistakes" and allowed some degree of open discussion about this history. But the government is unwilling to admit that the mass murder was intentional and continues to occasionally suppress and persecute dissidents who point out the truth.
    This reluctance is an obvious result of the fact that the Communist Party still rules China. Although they have repudiated many of Mao's specific policies, the regime still derives much of its legitimacy from his legacy. I experienced China's official ambivalence on this subject first-hand, when I gave a talk about the issue while teaching a course as a visiting professor at a Chinese university in 2014.
    II. Why it Matters.
    For both Chinese and westerners, failure to acknowledge the true nature of the Great Leap Forward carries serious costs. Some survivors of the Great Leap Forward are still alive today. They deserve far greater recognition of the horrible injustice they suffered. They also deserve compensation for their losses, and the infliction of appropriate punishment on the remaining perpetrators.

    In addition, our continuing historical blind spot about the crimes of Mao and other communist rulers, leads us to underestimate the horrors of such policies, and makes it more likely that they might be revived in the future. The horrendous history of China, the USSR, and their imitators, should have permanently discredited socialism as completely as fascism was discredited by the Nazis. But it has not – so far – fully done so.
    Just recently, the socialist government of Venezuela imposed forced labor on much of its population. Yet most of the media coverage of this injustice fails to note the connection to socialism, or that the policy has parallels in the history of the Soviet Union, China, Cuba, and other similar regimes. One analysis even claims that the real problem is not so much "socialism qua socialism," but rather Venezuela's "particular brand of socialism, which fuses bad economic ideas with a distinctive brand of strongman bullying," and is prone to authoritarianism and "mismanagement." The author simply ignores the fact that "strongman bullying" and "mismanagement" are typical of socialist states around the world. The Scandinavian nations – sometimes cited as examples of successful socialism- are not actually socialist at all, because they do not feature government ownership of the means of production, and in many ways have freer markets than most other western nations.
    Related: [We ignore Venezuela’s imminent implosion at our peril]
    Venezuela's tragic situation would not surprise anyone familiar with the history of the Great Leap Forward. We would do well to finally give history's largest episode of mass murder the attention it deserves.

    Ilya Somin is Professor of Law at George Mason University. His research focuses on constitutional law, property law, and popular political participation. He is the author of "The Grasping Hand: Kelo v. City of New London and the Limits of Eminent Domain" and "Democracy and Political Ignorance: Why Smaller Government is Smarter."

    Original article Remembering the biggest mass murder in the history of the world
    i remembever victims of wars in Hiroshima and Nagasaki , in Vietnam , in Nicaragua and in Korea .and in modern day in serbia , in afganistan , in iraq and in lybia ..unfortunately washington post doesn't write about that :D...
    they instead are busy in inventing horror story about the atrocities of communists :p..for people like u to believe in it ...

    United States war crimes - Wikipedia
     
    Dynamite Joe

    Dynamite Joe

    Well-Known Member
    First order of business is to deliver Taiwan back to China peacefully. That will make for one less stooge of the U.S. Perhaps then China can focus on S. Korea and getting the U.S. army base outta there which would make for one less base for the last militaristic empire.
     
    Thawra # Furoshima

    Thawra # Furoshima

    Well-Known Member
    First order of business is to deliver Taiwan back to China peacefully. That will make for one less stooge of the U.S. Perhaps then China can focus on S. Korea and getting the U.S. army base outta there which would make for one less base for the last militaristic empire.
    Taiwan will always be free under the Crusaders protection
     
    gramsci

    gramsci

    Legendary Member
    Taiwan will always be free under the Crusaders protection
    if the chinese decide to fart all together in one time they will wipe out taiwan and all what is surround it lol
     
    Dynamite Joe

    Dynamite Joe

    Well-Known Member
    Taiwan will always be free under the Crusaders protection
    As always, your posts are very insightful... One single fact you may have overlooked is China's stance towards Taiwan and Hong Kong is exemplary. It's restraint and approach is to be commended and quite unique for a modern superpower. If the U.S. was in it's place, they would have annexed Taiwan long ago by military force.
     
    gramsci

    gramsci

    Legendary Member
    As always, your posts are very insightful... One single fact you may have overlooked is China's stance towards Taiwan and Hong Kong is exemplary. It's restraint and approach is to be commended and quite unique for a modern superpower. If the U.S. was in it's place, they would have annexed Taiwan long ago by military force.
    its more complicated than that..u ignore the korean and japanese factors..
    after the Korean deal .. this will change drammatically ..
    USA is an empire on decline.. the more soft this decline , the better for all ..
     
    Thawra # Furoshima

    Thawra # Furoshima

    Well-Known Member
    its more complicated than that..u ignore the korean and japanese factors..
    after the Korean deal .. this will change drammatically ..
    USA is an empire on decline.. the more soft this decline , the better for all ..
    I will not count the US on the decline
    Robots revolution could happen in USA
    Like digital revolution before
    This story of US decline since 1980 is an old story
     
    Thawra # Furoshima

    Thawra # Furoshima

    Well-Known Member
    As always, your posts are very insightful... One single fact you may have overlooked is China's stance towards Taiwan and Hong Kong is exemplary. It's restraint and approach is to be commended and quite unique for a modern superpower. If the U.S. was in it's place, they would have annexed Taiwan long ago by military force.
    US had 6800 Nuclear bombs
    China less than 300
     
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